Where Is The Thermostat On A Hot Water Heater

How to adjust your water heater temperature

No one enjoys taking a cold shower. It’s much worse when you are scalded when the hot water is turned on. It is critical to correctly regulate the temperature on your water heater, not only for your health and safety, but also to save money on your power bill. Here’s how to regulate the temperature of your water heater to save money while also protecting your skin from sun damage.

The correct temperature range

A chilly shower is not something anybody enjoys taking. When you turn on the hot water, it is even worse since you will get scalded. Correctly regulating the temperature on your water heater is critical not only for your health and safety, but also for saving money on your power bill. You may save money and protect your skin by adjusting the temperature of your water heater.

Adjusting water heater temperature

The interface used to control the temperature of a water heater will differ depending on the kind and model. Fortunately, the majority of water heater models can be modified in the same way. For example, most contemporary gas and electric water heaters are equipped with a thermostat concealed behind an insulated access panel. Electric water heaters are frequently equipped with two thermostats: one at the top of the tank and another at the bottom. Furthermore, most tankless water heaters include a display with a temperature reading as well as controls for altering the water heater’s temperature.

Turn on the water in the bathroom or kitchen sink and let it to run until the water is completely hot before using.

Tankless

The process of adjusting a tankless water heater is quite similar to the process of adjusting your air conditioning thermostat. Adjust the temperature by using the digital control panel, which may be adjusted up or down as desired.

Gas or electric water heaters

Some gas water heaters include a dial towards the bottom of the device that may be adjusted simply by turning it – no tools are required for this operation. Nonetheless, most current tank water heaters (whether gas or electric) require a bit more effort, but the process is still straightforward and should only take a few minutes.

  • Turning off the water heater’s electricity at the circuit breaker is the first step. To remove a thermostat(s), locate the access panel for the thermostat(s) and remove it using a screwdriver
  • Remove the insulation by peeling it back. To adjust the thermostat, use a flathead screwdriver to turn it up or down.
  • If your water heater has two thermostats, make sure they are both set to the same temperature. The temperature on the top thermostat should be a few degrees higher than on the bottom thermostat.
  • Replace the insulation and re-install the access panel, if necessary. Reconnect the water heater’s power supply
  • It is possible that you may need to relight the pilot light on a gas water heater.

Once you’ve made the necessary adjustments, you should wait at least three hours before checking the water temperature once more. It is possible that you may need to make more modifications in order to get the desired temperature. If you’ve increased the temperature and are still getting chilly showers, it’s possible that your hot water heater has to be serviced or completely replaced. Is the energy efficiency of your home high? Here are five different methods to find out. CNET’s Guide to Smart Livingis a one-stop shop for tips, techniques, and how-to guides that can help you live a more intelligent life.

How To Replace A Water Heater Thermostat

Please keep in mind that this content may contain affiliate links.

This means that, at no additional cost to you, we may gain a small profit on purchases made via our links. The replacement of a onethermostat is an ideal time to replace both the upper and lower thermostats at the same time.

Testing the Thermostats on a Dual Element Water Heater

Because the majority of electric water heaters employ both an upper and a bottom element, the procedure outlined below is intended for these models only. A multimeter and a screwdriver will be required for this test. You can get an excellent, affordable multimeter online or at your local hardware shop for less than $20. Putting the UPPER thermostat through its paces:

  1. Because the majority of electric water heaters employ both an upper and a bottom element, the procedure outlined below is intended for such units. A multimeter and a screwdriver will be required for the testing. Online or at your local hardware shop, you may get a nice, affordable multimeter. Examining the thermostat on the UPPER level

Putting the LOWER thermostat through its paces:

  1. Set the top thermostat to the lowest setting possible. Make sure that the lower thermostat is set to its maximum setting. Check to see whether there is voltage on the bottom component. Assuming the multimeter indicates that there is power at the element, take a few minutes for the water to warm up.
  • Turn down the thermostat’s temperature setting and listen for an audible click, which shows that the thermostat is operating properly.
  • To determine whether there is power at the element if there is no voltage, check the lower thermostat.
  • In order to test the top contact screw, place one of the multimeter probes there and another probe on the metal shell of the water tank. It should display a voltage measurement of about 120 volts. The top thermostat, which supplies voltage to the lower thermostat, will need to be replaced if there is no indication of operation. Place one probe on the lower contact screw of the water tank and the second probe on the metal casing of the water tank if a reading is obtained. It should display around 120 volts. If this is not the case, the lower thermostat will have to be changed.

Electric Water Heater Thermostat Replacement

In order to test the top contact screw, place one of the multimeter probes there and another probe on the metal tank case. This device should display a voltage measurement of around 120 volts. The top thermostat, which supplies voltage to the lower thermostat, will require replacement if there is no reading. Place one probe on the lower contact screw of the water tank and the second probe on the metal casing of the water tank if a reading is received. 120 volts should be displayed on the screen.

Step 2

In order for the thermostat to sense the internal water temperature, it must be secured in place by means of a particular bracket that clamps down on it tightly against the tank wall. Remove one side of the bracket by gently prying it out while twisting the other side of the thermostat upwards to prevent the bracket from locking back into place. Repeat the process on the opposite side. On dual element versions, repeat the process with the lower thermostat.

Step 3

To purchase a replacement thermostat, bring the old thermostat(s) with you. Despite the fact that most thermostats are interchangeable, the greatest results are obtained by precisely matching the parts.

Step 4

If the bracket was broken during the removal of the thermostat, you can purchase a replacement bracket at the same time. When the old bracket is removed, the new one should be placed flat against the tank and dragged downward until it is securely in place.

Step 5

Each thermostat should be replaced by sliding it uniformly downward into the retaining bracket until it locks into position. Replace the wire in the exact same manner as it was removed. Replace the safety cover(s) and the access panel if they are damaged (s). Restore electricity to the water heater and allow it to run for one hour before checking the hot water pressure. If you believe that a heating element has failed as well, read How to Replace a Water Heater Element for more information.

Gas Water Heater Thermostat Replacement

Gas water heaters employ a different sort of thermostat system than electric water heaters. Generally speaking, on gas water heaters, the gas control valve, which incorporates both an adjustable thermostat and a heat limiting mechanism, is positioned on the outside of the unit, near the bottom. It may be distinguished from other components by the fact that it has temperature and pilot light controls.

The thermostat on a gas water heater will need to be replaced, and the gas control valve will need to be replaced as well. Do you need to change a water heater thermocouple or a water heater element? Refer to this page. Take a look at our articles on the subject!

Adjusting a Water Heater Thermostat

Adjusting the thermostat on your water heater is a little more difficult than adjusting the thermostat on your furnace. This thermostat is intended to be set once and forgotten about; in most cases, the factory settings are sufficient. Not sure whether this is the source of your issue? For a comprehensive overview of all of the issues that might arise with an electric water heater, see the article’Troubleshooting Electric Water Heaters ‘.

Too Little Hot Water

Are you considering boosting the temperature because you don’t have enough hot water to go around? Increasing the temperature is not the solution to this dilemma. It’s probable that you’re dealing with something else. It is possible that the thermostats themselves are not working properly, or that you have a burned out heating element. If you need further information on how to check to determine if your electric water heater thermostat or element is working properly, visit the articles ” Testing Electric Water Heater Thermostats ” and ” Testing Electric Water Heater Elements ”

Safety Concerns

It is necessary to conceal the water temperature changes for your electric hot water tank behind a couple of layers of insulation for safety reasons. Keep in mind that you must follow the ‘turning off the power’ recommendations while using an electric water heater. When you make this modification, you will be quite close to certain wires that have a significant amount of electricity flowing through them. When the temperature is set too high, there is a risk of burns. Water that has been heated to 160 degrees can provide you with a large amount of hot water.

  1. When there are youngsters in the house, it is especially important to set the thermostat to a conservative setting.
  2. It’s possible that the temperature of your water heater was set by the manufacturer.
  3. Do you truly want to make a difference?
  4. Hot water can cause serious burns if not used properly!
  5. WARNING!

Shutting Down the Water Heater

The water temperature adjustments for your electric hot water tank are concealed under a couple of layers of insulation for your protection. a. If you have an electric water heater, be sure to follow the ‘turning off the electricity’ instructions. This change will put you in close proximity to certain wires that have significant current flowing through them. When the temperature is set too high, there is a risk of overheating the building. Water that has been heated to 160 degrees can provide you with a large amount of hot water to drink.

Temperatures should be regulated moderately in the house, especially if there are youngsters around.

It’s possible that the temperature of your water heater was set at the factory.

So, are you genuinely interested in making a difference? WARNING! Hot water can cause severe burns if not used properly! DON’T SET THE TEMPERATURE OF YOUR HOT WATER TOO LOW! WARNING!

Locating the Thermostats

The water temperature changes for your electric hot water tank are concealed under a couple of layers of insulation for your protection. If you have an electric water heater, make sure you follow the ‘turning off the electricity’ requirements. When you make this modification, you will be quite close to certain wires that have a lot of electricity running through them. When the temperature is set too high, there is a risk of overheating. Water heated to 160 degrees can provide you with a large amount of hot water.

  1. Temperatures should be regulated moderately in the house, especially when there are youngsters around.
  2. It’s possible that the temperature of your water heater was set by the manufacturer when it was built.
  3. Do you truly want to make a difference?
  4. Hot water can cause serious burns if not used properly.
  5. WARNING!
See also:  How To Diagnose A Bad Water Pump

Adjusting The Thermostat

The water temperature changes for your electric hot water tank are buried under a couple of layers of insulation for your protection. Make sure you follow the ‘turning off the power’ instructions for electric water heaters. When you make this modification, you will be quite close to certain wires that have a lot of electricity flowing through them. It is possible to overheat the house if the thermostat is set too high. A water heater set to 160 degrees can provide you with a large amount of hot water.

  1. When there are youngsters in the house, it is especially important to set the thermostat on the conservative side.
  2. It’s possible that the temperature of your water heater was set by the manufacturer when it was installed.
  3. Do you truly want to make a change?
  4. Extremely Hot Water Can Cause Serious Burns!
  5. WARNING!

Summary

If you have an electric water heater, it is rare that you will need to modify the temperature. In the vast majority of cases, the factory settings are sufficient. If you are experiencing a lack of hot water, increasing the temperature will not solve the problem. Another issue, such as a “burned out element” or a “faulty thermostat,” is most likely the cause of your problem.

Troubleshooting the Thermostat on a Hot Water Heater

It is possible to have one or two thermostats on an electric water heater, depending on how many gallons are in the tank. The thermostats govern the temperature of the water.

The thermostats function by activating the heating components when the water temperature drops below a predetermined level. If any of the thermostats fail to operate, you will be unable to obtain hot water, or the water may begin to heat to dangerously high degrees, resulting in burns.

Electric Water Heater Problem

If your water heater is malfunctioning, you will notice that it warms water too slowly, does not create any hot water at all, produces hot water of worse quality than normal, or heats water to dangerously high temperatures. It is possible that the problem is with the thermostat of your heating equipment, which may be readily resolved by performing a simple repair or replacing the heating components.

Learning How to Fix Hot Water Elements and Thermostats

If your water heater is malfunctioning, you will notice that it warms water too slowly, does not create any hot water at all, produces hot water of worse quality than normal, or heats water to dangerously high temperatures, among other symptoms. A simple repair or replacement of the heating components may be all that is required to correct the problem with your heating device’s thermostat.

  1. If your water heater is malfunctioning, you will notice that it warms water too slowly, does not create any hot water at all, produces poorer quality hot water than normal, or heats water to dangerously high temperatures. It’s possible that the problem is with the thermostat of your heating equipment, which may be readily resolved by performing a simple repair or replacing the heating components.

If your water heater is malfunctioning, you will notice that it warms water too slowly, does not generate hot water at all, produces hot water of worse quality than normal, or heats water to dangerously high temperatures. It’s possible that the problem is with the thermostat of your heating equipment, which may be readily addressed by performing a simple repair or replacing the heating components.

Electric Water Heater Problem

If your water heater is malfunctioning, you will notice that it warms water too slowly, does not create any hot water at all, produces hot water of worse quality than normal, or heats water to dangerously high temperatures. It is possible that the problem is with the thermostat of your heating equipment, which may be readily resolved by performing a simple repair or replacing the heating components.

Learning How to Fix Hot Water Elements and Thermostats

If your water heater is malfunctioning, you will notice that it warms water too slowly, does not create any hot water at all, produces hot water of worse quality than normal, or heats water to dangerously high temperatures, among other symptoms. A simple repair or replacement of the heating components may be all that is required to correct the problem with your heating device’s thermostat.

  1. If your water heater is malfunctioning, you will notice that it warms water too slowly, does not create any hot water at all, produces poorer quality hot water than normal, or heats water to dangerously high temperatures. It’s possible that the problem is with the thermostat of your heating equipment, which may be readily resolved by performing a simple repair or replacing the heating components.

Before you begin working on your system, double-check that you have all of the necessary tools, such as a screwdriver, painter’s tape, gloves, and a replacement thermostat, on hand. Ensure that the electricity has been turned off as well so that you may work with the system without the risk of receiving an electric shock from the system. If you require further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact Service Champions Heating & Air Conditioning for assistance.

How to Set How Water Heater Temperature by Thermostat

You might be wondering how to adjust the temperature of your hot water heater. In this section, you will learn all you need to know about your gas or electric water heater thermostat, including how to adjust your hot water heater temperature thermostat and what temperature is optimum for hot water.

What’s the Right Temperature for a Hot Water Heater?

It’s an often asked question: what is the optimal temperature for hot water? Setting a tank-based hot water heater to 120 degrees Fahrenheit is recommended by the United States Department of Energy. If you have never changed the temperature of your hot water heater, it is most likely set to the 140-degree Fahrenheit level that is recommended by most manufacturers of hot water heaters. What is the significance of adhering to this temperature standard?

If the temperature setting on the water heater thermostat is set too high, the water will be excessively hot and might cause burning or scorching. If it is set too low, germs may be able to flourish, leading to the spread of water-borne illnesses.

How to Set Your Hot Water Heater Temperature Thermostat Setting

Before you make any modifications to the temperature thermostat setting on your hot water heater, you should first ascertain what the current temperature is set at so that you can establish how much you need to alter the settings. A conventional cooking thermometer may be used to quickly and accurately detect the temperature. You should calibrate your thermometer once you have determined the current temperature setting. Fill a cup halfway with cold water and submerge your thermometer until the temperature dial reaches 32 degrees, or the lowest temperature displayed on your thermometer’s gauge, and then remove it.

Meanwhile, locate the faucet that is closest to the water heater and turn it on until it is hot (while you are calibrating your thermometer).

If your thermostat is set too high, the temperature may be high enough to burn you.

Adjusting aGasHot Water Heater Temperature Thermostat Setting

The majority of gas water heaters are straightforward due to the presence of a clearly readable dial at the bottom of the tank’s bottom section. If you follow the methods outlined below, it is simple and straightforward to alter this dial.

  1. First, adjust the temperature by turning the knob to the hotter or cooler position, depending on the situation. After that, let it sit for a few hours (around three or four) and then check the temperature again. If the temperature is still incorrect, make another adjustment and repeat the process until the problem is resolved. Do you require assistance? Call Hackler Plumbing for a free estimate. If you want the services of aMcKinney plumber, we can assist you

Adjusting anElectricHot Water Heater Temperature Thermostat Setting

The process of adjusting the temperature thermostat setting on an electric hot water heater is a little more difficult, but still pretty simple. The vast majority of electric water heaters are equipped with two thermostats: an upper and a lower thermostat, both of which are placed beneath two control panels. Setting both thermostats to the same temperature can help to guarantee that your electric water heater operates as effectively as possible. One thing to keep in mind is that some tiny electric hot water heaters only have one thermostat.

Here’s how to adjust the temperature on your electric hot water heater thermostat:

Please keep in mind that you will want a screwdriver to execute the following procedures in order to alter the temperature of your water heater.

  1. Make sure your water heater is off by turning off the electricity. This may be accomplished by locating your circuit breaker and shutting off the electricity in the area surrounding your water heater
  2. Then, locate the thermostat(s) on your water heater and turn them on. Typically, they are located behind a control panel that is secured with screws. Remove the cover from the access panel using your screwdriver (s). To access the thermostat, you may need to remove the insulation from your heater if it is properly insulated. The thermostats will be controlled by a dial, and the dials will have a varying reading depending on the manufacturer of the heater. Once the control panel has been removed, you may change the temperature knobs to make the room hotter or colder according on your preferences in terms of temperature. Take care to set both thermostats to the same temperature setting if you have more than one. Replace the control panel covers and the screws with your screwdriver after they have been removed. After that, re-energize your water heater’s electrical system. After many hours, check the temperature of your hot water (about three to four). Continue to follow the above instructions until the water temperature reaches the required setting
  3. If it still does not, repeat them until the temperature reaches the ideal setting for your needs.

Other Considerations: Water Heater Thermostat Setting Safety

There is one thing you should be aware of: your water heater is fitted with something known as a temperature and pressure relief valve, abbreviated “T P valve.” These can become worn out over time, and one sign that they should be replaced is the presence of water leaking through. This is a very crucial safety feature. If your unit is old, or if your hot water heater pressure relief valve is leaking after it has been replaced, get it examined by a competent plumbing professional.

Test & Replace a Water Heater Thermostat: DIY Guide

We shall almost certainly all be confronted with the situation of a water heater that is not producing any hot water at some point in our lives. We have two options: either contact a qualified plumber or do it ourselves. Fortunately, most water heaters can be repaired reasonably quickly and inexpensively. There are two primary reasons for a water heater not working: If you’ve never checked or changed a water heater thermostat before, it might seem like a difficult process at first glance. It’s not too difficult.

See also:  How To Install Tankless Gas Water Heater

When bathing or cleaning, no one enjoys using cold water.

If you are experiencing no hot water, we will need to examine the water heater thermostat and, if necessary, replace it. In this post, we will look at how to diagnose your electric water heaterthermostat and how to replace it if it becomes damaged or malfunctioning.

How Electric Water Heater Thermostats Work

Testing or replacing a water heater thermostat might be a difficult process if you haven’t done it before. It isn’t too difficult to figure out. As a result, if you have someone who knows what they’re doing to guide you through the process and a few basic tools, it’s quite simple. When it comes to bathing or cleaning, no one enjoys using cold water. The water heater thermostat will need to be tested and replaced if necessary if you do not have hot water. In this post, we’ll look at how to diagnose your electric water heater thermostat and, if necessary, how to replace it.

Are Electric Water Heater Thermostats Universal?

No, not all water heater thermostats are designed to be interchangeable. It is important to note that there are certain differences in thermostats between single-element and dual-element water heaters. Additionally, with dual-element water heaters, there is a differential between the top and bottom thermostats. In order to properly select a water heater thermostat, you must first determine the number of elements and the voltage of the water heater in question. It is possible to obtain this information from the data tag located on the side of the water heater.

The voltage is inscribed on the end of the heating element, and it may be read with a magnifying glass.

There are more than 50 different household tank-style electric water heaters available on the market, and the thermostats on the majority of them are designed to be interchangeable.

Dual-ElementThermostats

Typical household water heater thermostats are seen in this photo, which includes an upper and lower thermostat for each. Because it is located above the lower thermostat, the thermostat on the left has a high limit switch, which can be identified by the red reset button. The upper thermostat is in charge of controlling both the upper element and the lower thermostat, respectively. When you look at it from this angle, you can see the bottom thermostat, which regulates the lower element. For a replacement kit that includes two heating elements, upper and lower thermostats, and seals, we offer theRheem SP20060 Electric Water Heater Tune-Up Kit, which can be purchased on Amazon.com for about $30.

A universal upperthermostat produced by Rheem is what we’re looking at here.

It is a Rheem lower thermostat that is universal in use.

Single-Element Thermostats

The thermostat seen here is for a water heater with a single heating element. The thermostat is very similar to an upper dual-element thermostat, with the only variation being the amount of wire terminals on the thermostat. In this case, the single element thermostat has just two terminals on the right side and four on the left side, as you can see in the illustration. If you require a single-element thermostat, the Camco 07843 Single Element Water Heater Thermostat with HLC is a good option to consider purchasing.

This is a single-element thermostat with a built-in high limit switch that is universally applicable. The following is a list of the supplies you’ll require:

  • An example of a single-element water heater thermostat is seen in this photo. However, the number of wire terminals on this thermostat differs from that of an upper dual-element thermostat, which is similar in appearance. In this case, the single element thermostat has just two terminals on the right side and four on the left side, as you can see in the diagram. A single-element thermostat, such as the Camco 07843 Single Element Water Heater Thermostat with HLC, is available for purchase. An integrated high limit switch is included in this universal single-element thermostat. Here’s a list of the items you’ll need to complete your project:

How to Test a Water Heater Thermostat for Continuity – Step-By-Step

We must examine the thermostats for continuity in order to identify whether or not the thermostat has failed. You’ll need an analog or digital multimeter for this, which you can get here. WARNING: Working with electricity is extremely hazardous and can result in death. Before dealing with wiring or electrical connections, be certain that the power is turned off. Follow these procedures to determine which thermostat is malfunctioning.

Step 1: Turn the power off

Checking the thermostats for continuity can help us identify whether or not a particular thermostat is malfunctioning. An analog or digital multimeter will be required for this task. Caution: Working with electricity is extremely dangerous and can result in death if not done correctly. Before working with wiring or electrical connections, be certain that the power is turned off in the area. Follow these methods to determine which thermostat is malfunctioning and which is working properly.

Step 2: Remove the outside access covers

To remove the access cover from the upper and lower thermostats, use a 1/4-inch nut driver or flathead screwdriver to pry them off. Fold the insulation back over the thermostat to prevent it from being damaged. To keep the insulation out of the way, use tape to hold it in place. Remove the plastic cover that covers the thermostat on the inside of the house.

Step 3: Confirm power is off to the water heater

Remove the access cover from the upper and lower thermostats with a 1/4-inch nut driver or a flathead screwdriver. Fold the insulation back over the thermostat to protect it from the elements. Insulation should be secured out of the way using tape before continuing. Remove the plastic cover that covers the thermostat on the interior of the house.

Step 4: Check the high limit reset button

Remove the access cover from the upper and lower thermostats with a 1/4-inch nut driver or flathead screwdriver. Fold the insulation back over the thermostat to protect it. To keep the insulation out of the way, use tape to fasten it. Remove the plastic inner cover that covers the thermostat.

  • There is a short circuit between the thermostat contacts
  • The thermostat is out of tune
  • The heating element has failed

Step 5: Disconnect the wiring

Take a photo with your phone or a digital camera to use as a reference if it becomes necessary to identify which cables are connected to which terminal in the future. To detach the wiring from the thermostat terminals, unscrew the terminal screws using a Phillips #2 screwdriver and pull the wiring away from the terminals.

Step 6: Check the thermostat with a multimeter

Set the resistance of the multimeter to the lowest ohms possible (typically x10). Using your fingers, squeeze the probes together and adjust the needle to zero to calibrate your meter. To check the resistance of a digital multimeter, set it to the lowest possible value of resistance (usually 200), or, if your multimeter has an option for resistance with tone, choose it. Take one of the black probes from your multimeter and insert it into the screw terminal on the left side of the instrument. Take the red probe and connect it to the other left-side terminal on the other side.

This means that the thermostat is not functioning properly and must be replaced.

For a demonstration, please see the video above.

As soon as you have finished testing your water heater thermostat, you may either reconnect the wire and close the access cover, or you can proceed to the next step, which is replacing the thermostat.

Assuming you have decided that your thermostats do not require replacement, you may proceed to inspect your heating components. How to Test and Replace a Faulty Water Heating Element is a step-by-step guide that explains how to accomplish this in further detail.

How to Replace a Faulty Water Heater Thermostat – Step-By-Step

Once you’ve discovered which thermostat is faulty, it’s time to begin the process of removing and replacing it. Insider’s Tip: As previously said, it is typically a good idea to change both thermostats and heating components on a yearly or biannual basis. The reason for this is that if one of the heating components is beginning to fail, it has the potential to short out the replacement thermostat shortly after it has been placed, causing it to fail. Some of the stages will be repeated in this section.

For those who have not yet tested their thermostats, we will first go through the preparatory processes.

Step 1: Turn the power off

Following your determination of which thermostat is faulty, it is time to begin the procedure of removing and replacing it. Insider’s Tip: As previously stated, it is normally recommended that both thermostats and heating components be replaced. One of the reasons for this is that if one of the heating components is beginning to fail, it may cause the replacement thermostat to short out quickly after it has been set up. There are a few stages that you will repeat in this section. Following the testing methods provided above, you may be able to skip to Step 5.

So, let’s get this party started!

Step 2: Remove the outside access covers

Remove the cover panel that corresponds to the thermostat that has to be replaced and set the cover panel aside. The coverings for water heater tanks are often located on the side of the tank. Ensure that you do not loose any of the little screws by using the 1/4-inch nut driver or a flathead screwdriver for this section. Remove the insulation from the thermostat as well as the plastic protective cover that covers it.

Step 3: Confirm power is off to the water heater

Each wire should be tested with your multimeter/voltmeter. You may accomplish this by grounding out one of the wires and carefully checking each terminal. Even if you have shut off the power at the circuit breaker, you should always double-check your work using one of these meters to ensure that you have not electrocuted yourself. Connect the top and legs of the multimeter at the same time, using the multimeter connectors. The meter should read 0 at this point. With the black connector contacting the water heater tap each leg to check there’s no power.

Step 4: Disconnect the wiring

Take a photo with your phone or a digital camera to use as a reference if it becomes necessary to identify which cables are connected to which terminal in the future. Disconnect the wiring from each terminal on the thermostat with a Phillips screwdriver #2. Remove the thermostat from the wall.

Step 5: Remove the defective thermostat

Gently remove the old thermostat by pulling outward on the clips and raising the thermostat up and out of the retaining bracket with your finger or a flathead screwdriver.

Caution should be exercised to avoid breaking the retainer bracket. It is possible that breaking this retaining clip will result in the need to replace your water heater.

Step 6: Insert the new thermostat

Inserting the new thermostat into the retaining bracket that holds the old thermostat in place will allow you to precisely position the new thermostat. Reconnect the wires back onto the right terminals. If necessary, you can refer to the photograph you took previously for guidance. Check to see that each wire is securely linked to the next. Check to see that the thermostat is securely attached to the water heater, otherwise the thermostat may not function properly. After that, adjust the thermostat to the temperature you prefer for the water.

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These modifications may be accomplished with the use of a flathead screwdriver.

The following is an insider’s tip: If you intend to replace your heating element with your new thermostat, you will need to empty the water heater first.

Check out our post on how to empty your water heater, as well as additional water heater care advice.

Step 7: Reattach the cover panels

Now that you’ve completed the replacement, it’s time to seal everything up and double-check your work for mistakes. Remove the plastic protective cover and insulation and replace them with new ones. Reattach the outside access panels if they have been removed.

Step 8: Turn the power back on

Following the completion of the installation, return to the electrical box and re-energize the circuit breaker (if necessary). Hot water recovery will take around one hour to complete, but you should be able to use hot water within 15 minutes after turning on the faucet. Over the next several days, make sure to check on the water heater on a regular basis.

Water Heater Thermostat FAQs

Electric water heater thermostats are typically pre-set by the manufacturer to 110 or 120 degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the model. You have the option of increasing the temperature to the maximum setting, which is typically 150 degrees Fahrenheit, if necessary (65 degrees Celsius). The maximum water temperature setting should be no greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48 degrees Celsius), since a higher setting might provide a scorching threat to small children and the elderly.

Should water heater thermostats be set to the same temperature?

In fact, the top and lower thermostats should both be set at the same temperature. The dip tube is responsible for delivering cold water to the bottom of the tank. Having consistent settings across the tank helps to keep the temperature consistent throughout the tank.

What would cause a water heater thermostat to burn up?

A malfunctioning heating element, a power surge, or just the passage of time can cause a water heater thermostat to burn up. When internal components of water heater thermostats wear out, they become faulty and fail. An older thermostat can fail even at normal electric currents. If the manual reset switch on your water heater thermostat does not work, the thermostat will need to be repaired or replaced.

Replacement of both thermostats and heating elements should be done at the same time because if one of the heating elements is beginning to fail, it may cause the new thermostat to short out shortly after it is installed, which is not recommended.

Final Thoughts

That’s all there is to it! Water heaters aren’t too difficult to maintain, and replacing a thermostat can be completed in a matter of minutes if you know what you’re doing and have the right tools. The most important thing to remember while working with electrical equipment is to avoid taking shortcuts. However, employing the appropriate procedures and tools can make sure your water heater thermostat replacement is a quick and safe job. DISCLAIMER: The information provided on HomeInspectionInsider.com is not intended to be professional guidance.

HomeInspectionInsider.com is owned and run by Hubert Miles is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program intended to provide a way for sites to make advertising fees by advertising and referring to Amazon.com.

Hubert Miles receives a commission for referring traffic and business to these businesses.

What temperature is right for your water here?

When it comes to conserving energy at home, one of the first things that comes to mind is most likely changing the thermostat settings on your home heating system to the lowest possible level. Nevertheless, what about the temperature control device on your water heating system? The factory default setting on most water heaters supplied today is 140 degrees, and sometimes even higher – a temperature that is high enough to induce scorching but not high enough to meet the needs of most people (there are exceptions to this, however, as we will see).

However, the most compelling reason to lower your water temperature is to save electricity (and, consequently, money).

When you adjust your water heater’s thermostat to 120 degrees Fahrenheit rather than 140 degrees Fahrenheit, you’ll save around $50 per year in standing heat loss and more than $400 per year in fuel use.

A 140° setting is right in certain circumstances

However, while the majority of individuals can get by with a 120-degree setting, there are some situations in which a 140-degree setting is more appropriate. For example, if you have a member of your family who has a compromised immune system or chronic respiratory condition, a 140-degree setting is suggested to avoid Legionnaires’ disease and other water-borne illnesses.

Additionally, if your dishwasher does not pre-heat the water, you may want to keep the temperature at a higher setting.

Checking your water heater thermostat temperature

This video from the United States Department of Energy will help you determine what temperature your hot water heater is set at and how to modify it. For any more assistance, please contact us and we will lead you through the process step by step. In the event that your water heater is having difficulty maintaining its temperature, or if you’re experiencing other water heater difficulties such as strange noises, a sulfur smell, or sediment buildup, please call us immediately. Repair and replacement of water heaters are available throughout western Massachusetts, and we can provide you with a FREE quote on a water heater upgrade for your house.

For additional information, please contact us immediately!

How to replace an electric water heater thermostat

Replacement of the thermostat in an electric water heater is covered in detail in this do-it-yourself repair guide. The thermostat regulates the temperature of the water by turning on and off the heating element on and off. If the thermostat stops operating, the element will either not turn on at all, resulting in cold water, or it will stay on for an excessive amount of time, resulting in scorching water. Replace a faulty thermostat with a replacement part that has been approved by the manufacturer.

  • O.
  • How to replace the thermostat on an electric water heater with this video repair instruction.
  • Warning: It might be dangerous to do repairs or maintenance on appliances or power equipment without proper training.
  • In an effort to decrease the danger, make use of the right tools and safety equipment as specified in the applicable handbook and adhere to all of the guidelines.
  • A qualified technician, on the other hand, should be called in for some repairs or maintenance.

How to replace thermostat on gas water heater

This Honeywell gas thermostat is NOT removed from tank.instructions on separate pageHow to replace atmospheric Honeywell gas water heater thermostatThis Honeywell gas water heater thermostat can be removed from tankand steps shown on this page: This Honeywell gas thermostat is NOT removed from tank.instructions on separate page How to replace Honeywell gas water heater thermostatThis Honeywell gas water heater thermostat can be removed from tankand steps shown on this page: Range 90�, Hot is 120� F // Very Hot 156�, ECO limit 199� FResource .pdf:How to replace power vent water heater gas valve 1How to replace power vent gas control thermostat 2 Also read instructions below on this page_How to light water heater / pdfBradford White power vent service manual/ pdfError codes and service manualsBuyExample Honeywell gas control valve at Amazon Intellivent gas water heater thermostat IS removed from tank, and steps shown on this pageIntellivent gas water heater thermostat can be RESETResource:Read about resetting intelliventHow to light water heaterIntellivent error codes and service manuals Also read instructions below on this pageBuyBuy Intellivent gas control at AmazonWhite Rodgers/ Rheem Intellivent gas controlAO Smith intellivent Mechanical gas valves are removed from tank, and steps shown on this pageThermostat is located inside copper tube To replace thermostat, gas control valve must be replacedService manuals for all types gas control valvesBuyGas water heater thermostats at Amazon Thermostats are usually single-use after ECO trips Water heater Gas thermostat has Energy Cut OffWhen ECO senses overheating inside tank, the ECO trips and shuts off gas.If water heater burner or pilot has gas, then ECO is not tripped.Gas valve must be replaced (except Intellivent which can be reset).

ECO must have continuityResource:Read moreTest ECO on Robertshaw- White RodgersRead about resetting intelliventBuyGas water heater thermostats at Amazon Replacement starts here for all models Before spending money on repairs, check anode rod Anode will stop tank from rusting.

  • Anode is located on top of tank, either regular 1-1/16” hex head located on top of heater in separate anode port, or combo anode that is connected to hot water nipple.
  • Turn gas control knob to “OFF” position.
  • Handle will be parallel with gas line when gas is ON.Rotate gas shut off handle perpendicular across line to shut gas OFF. Turn off water and drain tank Let water heater cool for a couple hours.
  • Use only black pipe or flexible yellow gas line.
  • For propane, threads are reverse.
  • Note how tight each is when removing, so re-installation is about same.The thermocouple or thermopile will be connected hand tight plus 1/4 turn.

These connections do not need pipe sealant or teflon tape.Remove the ECO wires, Thermocouple, Manifold tube and Pilot tube Use 1/2″ galvanized pipe as handle Screw piece of galvanized pipe into gas control valve and use as handle to unscrew old gas control.Loosen gas control using weight of water inside tank, then drain tank before removing completely. Use weight of water in tank to loosen gas valve.

then Drain tankTurn off water and drain tank completelyIf tank won’t drain, connect washing machine hose and water hose to drain valve to flush open.

If not, add 6 wraps white teflon tape to threads.Install new gas control into tank.

No teflon tape on tubes under gas control.Thermocouple is finger-tight plus �” Electronic gas controls have wires for thermopile and do not have thermocouple. Re-attach gas lineUsing yellow teflon tape, or gas-approved thread sealant Yellow is for gas.

Larger imageGas pressure is low, so it takes time before leak will show. Use soapy waterto check for leakson gas line, and on tubes under new gas control.

Use plenty of soapy water.

Do not overtighten.Manifold and pilot tube: look for reverse thread on LP water heater.

If you can install water line without leaking, you can do the same with gas line.

Smell close to floor since some gas can be heavier than air and will settle downward.

Turn off main shut-off at gas meter. Bathtub running full stream before lighting water heater Tank must be full of water before lighting 18) Fill tank completely with water until water is coming out of tub spout.

Tank cannot have any air when burner is turned on or damage can occur to tank. How to light typical gas water heater Read directions printed on side of your tank Light new water heater as shown on label located front of water heater Read product manual for tips and advisories.Resource:How to light gas water heater by type of gas control valve Note: New gas heater might have small water leak when first fired up because of condensationIgnore a bit of water inside combustion area or bottom of tank.

This water is condensation and will disappear as tank reaches set temperature.Any cold tank can show same condensation when fired up.Water pipes should not be leaking.Water should not be dripping down vent pipe: this signals bad venting or other vent problem.Don’t worry excessively, but if needed, post questions on professional water heater forum:The Tank

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