How To Strap A Water Heater

Water Heaters (How to secure them)

Español Fresh water after a crisis may be as near as your water heater – assuming, of course, that it is still standing erect when the calamity occurs. Water heaters should be secured to the wall studs to ensure that this important resource is protected.

First check for plumber’s tape

Following the earthquakes in 1989 Loma Prieta and 1994 Northridge, experts revised the process for strapping water heaters. Previously, a single strap of plumbers’ tape was usually employed to hold the hose together. In light of the large number of tanks that have burst through this strapping, experts now recommend:

  • In order to properly secure the tank, it should be secured from the top and bottom, rather than only from the top or just from the center. Instead of plumbers’ tape, heavy-gauge metal strapping should be used. Replacement of all copper and metal pipes with flexible natural gas and water line connections is recommended.

Second, secure tank with heavy-gauge metal straps, top and bottom

  • Strapping kits, which are readily accessible from commercial sources, make this a pretty simple operation. These may be purchased at many hardware stores beside the water heaters on the same aisle as the water heaters. These kits provide everything you need to get started, including strapping, lag screws, washers, spacers, and tension bolts. Additionally, heavy-gauge metal straps and 3-inch lag screws can be used to build the strapping materials on your own. The tank should have as little space as possible between it and the wall in order to prevent it from tipping backwards. Installing a wooden block against the wall with long lag screws will help if the gap is greater than 1 or 2 inches. The heavy-gauge metal strapping should be wrapped around the tank one and a half times. Begin by securing the strapping at the back of the tank using tape. Bring it to the front of the room and then back to the rear wall
  • Using multiple 1/4-inch x 3-inch or longer lag screws with large washers, attach this strapping to the wall studs or the wood block. If you are fastening it straight into concrete, instead of screws, use 1/4-inch expansion bolts to hold it in place.

An emergency source of water

  • Obtaining water is as simple as attaching a garden hose to the drain spout and turning on a faucet someplace in the home
  • Nevertheless, Before opening the drain, make sure that the power or natural gas is turned off.

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Water Heater

A common occurrence is when unsecured water heaters fall over, rupturing inflexible water and natural gas connections. If your water heater does not have two straps that wrap fully around it and are screwed into the studs or masonry of the wall, it is not adequately braced, and this should be addressed immediately. One way of bracing a water heater is seen in the figure below. There are bracing kits available to make this operation as simple as possible. A plumber should also be called in to install flexible (corrugated) copper water connectors if they haven’t previously been done.

Protected source of water – or a puddle

Fresh water after a crisis may be as near as your water heater – assuming, of course, that it remains upright during the event. A standard water heater has a capacity of 30 to 50 gallons of water. This water supply, on the other hand, is very sensitive to the ground undulation (swells and rolls) and ground acceleration caused by earthquakes, which can cause them to topple over and spill. Water heaters should be secured to the wall studs to ensure that this important resource is protected.

Changes to strapping recommendations

Your tank may have been strapped, but it may have been done wrongly, as earlier procedures are no longer advised by the military. Due to the fact that many water heaters ruptured through their strapping in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake in San Francisco and the 1994 Northridge earthquake in Los Angeles, experts have adjusted the suggested process for strapping water heaters to prevent this from happening in the future. The following are the two most significant modifications recommended by experts:

  1. Make sure the hot water tank is securely fastened from top to bottom instead of merely at its highest point or at its lowest point. Instead of plumber’s tape, heavy-gauge metal strapping should be used. Many water heaters were damaged or destroyed in the earthquakes of 1989 and 1994, despite the fact that the plumber’s tape intended to keep them safe was broken through. It has been discovered that the thin metal used in plumber’s tape is too fragile to be effective

Securing your hot water tank

Make sure your water heater is secure.

  • The distance between the water heater and the wall should be kept to a bare minimum. If there is more than 1 or 2 inches of space between the wall studs, connect a wooden block to the studs using long lag screws (see illustration on page 20). The objective of this feature is to keep the heater from toppling over backwards. Wrap the heavy-gauge metal strapping around the tank a total of 112 times. Begin by securing the strapping at the back of the tank using tape. It should be brought to the front and then pushed back against the wall (as seen below)
  • Several 1/4′′ x 3′′ or longer lag screws with large washers are used to attach the strapping to the wall studs or the wood block to keep it in place. The screws can be replaced with 1/4-inch expansion bolts if the structure is being secured directly into concrete
  • Replacement of all copper and metal pipes with flexible natural gas and water line connections is recommended.

Commercially available kits, such as this one, include all of the necessary hardware, including strapping, lag screws, washers, spacers, and tension bolts. These kits, which are available at a variety of local hardware stores, are highly recommended. Inspect to see that the strap has been wrapped around the water heater 1 1/2 times. Water heaters are a good source of backup water in an emergency. This is made easier by attaching a garden hose to the drain spout, which allows you to easily get water from the drain spout.

Pour the water via a faucet someplace in the home to make it simpler for it to drain away. Before opening the drain, make sure that the electricity or natural gas has been turned off.

Another Solution for Water Heaters

When water heaters are not correctly braced, they can tumble over during an earthquake, resulting in the following consequences:

  • Gas lines that have ruptured and gas leaks
  • Fires that have caused significant damage to residences
  • Water pipes that have burst and flooded

During an earthquake, the unbraced water heater in this residence collapsed, causing a fire that completely consumed the house. California Seismic Safety Commission is the source of this information.

How to Identify

  • The water heater is freestanding, isn’t it? Exist belts or other sorts of constraints to keep the water heater from moving around? Whether or not straps or other restraints have been fastened to the studs If the water heater has been secured, was the job done correctly and in accordance with the most recent recommendations? Is the water heater linked to flexible water and gas lines
  • If so, where are they located?

During the Morgan Hill Earthquake of 1984, this water heater that was not properly secured tipped over. Fortunately, no gas or water pipes were broken during the incident. California Seismic Safety Commission is the source of this information.

Remember

  • It can cost more than $500 to replace a water heater after an earthquake
  • However, there are certain exceptions. It is possible to spend several thousand dollars to repair fire and flood damage, not to mention the cost of your property as an investment. Check with your local Building Department for specifics on the standards in your community. Make a note of the location of your main water valve so that you can cut it off in the event of a leak. Keep track of the location of your main gas valve so that you can switch it off if you hear or smell a gas leak.

Water heaters must be braced (that is, firmly fastened) to the wall studs in order to function properly. Water heaters in California must be braced at the time of sale or when a new water heater is installed, according to state regulations.

The Solution

There are a number of recommended remedies, all of which are reasonably affordable.

  • Purchase and assemble a strap kit or bracing kit from your local hardware shop and follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Make certain that the kit has been approved by the State Architect.

Other choices are as follows:

  • Among the other possibilities are:

Flexible pipes should be used in the gas and water lines, as well. During an earthquake, they are far more secure than rigid pipes. Make care to inspect the straps at least once a year. They may get dislodged as a result of vibrations or other factors.

How-to Resources

  • Your local home improvement store
  • How to Brace Your Water Heater, City of Los Angeles, Department of Building Safety, Information BulletinP/PC 2002-003, June 14, 1999
  • How to Brace Your Water Heater August 11, 2004
  • Guidelines for Earthquake Bracing of Residential Water Heaters, Department of General Services, Division of the State Architect
  • How to Secure Your Water Heater, Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, 2003
  • How to Secure Your Water Heater, Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, 2003

How to Install a Double-Strap Hot Water Heater Restraint

In the case of an earthquake, the safety of yourself and your family should be your first priority. The time to consider adequately securing your hot water heater from earthquake damage is now, before the event occurs. The installation of a double-strap water heater restraint is recommended by home inspectors. Certified kits comprising all of the essential components are available at hardware and home improvement stores.

  1. Draw lines parallel to the top third and bottom third of the water heater so that the straps can be installed without interfering with gas or electrical connections or the pressure release valve when the straps are installed. Mark the studs flanking the water heater so that they are even with both the top third and bottom third. Pilot holes for the strap mounting screws should be drilled at the markings, two in each stud. Using the screws included in the package, attach the four strap fasteners to the studs on either side of the strap. Prepare the straps so that they will be simple to wrap around the heater before fastening the fasteners to the wall to ensure that they are properly fastened
  2. One strap should be wrapped around the top of the water heater to keep it in its proper place. Bring the other top strap up to meet it, and make sure the two cinching brackets are in the same place. In order to compensate for slack in some kits, it may be required to draw additional length through one of the brackets. Thread the bolt that joins the cinching brackets together and manually tighten it to hold the straps in place while the straps are being adjusted. The technique should be repeated for the bottom set of straps. Inspect the straps to ensure that they are routed correctly and that they do not interfere with the water heater’s plumbing or connections. Using an adjustable wrench, tighten the straps by rotating the cinching bracket bolts until they are snug. It’s a good idea to try to rock the water heater back and forth. Make any required adjustments to the straps.
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The Importance of Strapping your Water Heater

Strapping your water heater is critical for its safety. The purpose of water heater strapping is to ensure that the water line and gas supply do not get separated as a consequence of the back and forth movement of the water heater’s tank. A water heater has the ability to travel in any direction in the case of an earthquake. Using a quarter-inch bolt into a stud and strapping it in the center third of the wall with no gap between the heater and the wall to ensure a firm connection, the California Plumbing Code states that you must strap your water heater to the wall.

Water heaters can fall if they are not properly secured using straps that are entirely wrapped around them and securely fastened to the studs on which they are mounted.

The Double-Strap Method

Various ways of anchoring water heaters have been employed in the past. Some methods may be quite effective, while others could just provide a false feeling of security. “L” brackets– These brackets are often fastened to the wall studs on one side using wood screws. Most of the time, wood screws are a bit shorter than planned, which means they are unable to provide adequate strength to support the weight, and the water heater skin is thinner than expected, which means the metal screws are unable to protect the water heater skin from ripping during an earthquake.

  • Because it is often available in a variety of sizes, the strength of the material varies significantly.
  • It has a relatively modest breaking strength when compared to the weight of a 500-pound water heater that is moving about.
  • Some authorities have now prohibited it from being used at all.
  • Pipe nipple brackets– are used to join two pipes together at their ends.
  • In the past, these goods were widely utilized; however, they were eventually banned since earthquakes had the potential to cause pipelines to burst and leak.
  • Single strap– At one point, this approach was thought enough for ensuring that your water heater didn’t move while you were away.
  • Double strap– According to the most recent regulations, all water heaters must be secured in two places.

The double body strap has become the industry standard, whether it is wrapped around the body or rotated 180 degrees, with the 180-degree variant being widely chosen by the trade.

How to Secure Your Water Heater

All water heaters in the state of California are required to be strapped in order to prevent them from moving during an earthquake. The installation of an over-the-counter “water heater restraint” kit that has been approved by the Office of State Architect can accomplish this goal (O.S.A.). All water heaters must be secured in at least two places: the top one-third of the unit and the bottom one-third of the unit, whichever is greater. The bottom strap must be positioned at least 4 inches above the water heater control unit to be effective.

In order to secure the restraints to the wall, lag screws with a diameter of not less than 1/4 inch must be used, and each lag screw must have a thread penetration into the wall stud of at least 1-1/2 inch.

Please keep in mind that perforated iron strap (plumber’s tape) will not be an appropriate material for strapping or bracing water heaters larger than 40 gallons in capacity.

  1. Draw lines parallel to one other and to the center third of the water heater’s top and base, so that when straps are fastened, they completely enclose the tank without interfering with the gas or electrical connections, or the pressure release valve, and the tank is totally protected. Drill two pilot holes in each stud at the locations indicated by the markings for the strap mounting screws. Using the screws included in the package, attach the four strap fasteners to the studs on either side of the strap. After adjusting the straps so that they will be simple to wrap around the heater, screw the fasteners to the wall to ensure that they are secure
  2. The top of the water heater should be secured with one strap, which should be tightened. Bring the other strap up to meet it and make sure the two cinching brackets are in alignment. In certain kits, it is essential to thread an additional length of cable through one of the brackets in order to make up for the slack. Attach the bolt to the joint where the cinching brackets meet and tighten it firmly to keep the straps in their proper place. To attach the bottom set of straps, follow the same procedure as before
  3. First, check the straps to ensure that they are securely fastened so that they do not interfere with the pipes and connections. In order to tighten the straps, use an adjustable wrench to turn the nuts on the cinching bracket. Alternatively, you may try swinging the water heater back and forth to see whether it holds correctly, but if it does not, you can always tighten the straps as needed.

Draw lines parallel to one other and to the center third of the water heater’s top and base, so that when straps are fastened, they completely enclose the tank without interfering with the gas or electrical connections, or the pressure release valve, when the tank is totally protected. To install the strap mounting screws, drill two pilot holes in each stud where the markings are located. Using the screws included in the package, attach the four strap fasteners to the studs on the wall. After adjusting the straps so that they will be simple to wrap around the heater, tighten the bolts to the wall securely.

As you bring the other strap up to meet it, be sure that the two cinching brackets are in alignment.

Tighten the bolt that connects the cinching brackets together until the straps are securely fastened in place.

With an adjustable wrench, tighten the straps by turning the nuts on the cinching bracket.

Are Water Heater Straps Required in Nevada?

As a homeowner in the state of Nevada, you are responsible for adhering to all applicable municipal rules when installing new plumbing equipment, such as a hot water heater. Posted onJuly 26, 2019by You may have heard about water heater straps, but you’re not sure whether or not they’re truly essential in your situation.

We’ll go into further detail about what these straps accomplish and whether or not they are necessary in the state of Nevada further down the page. Do you need to get your water heater repaired in Las Vegas? Contact Us at (702) 234-2345.

What Is a Hot Water Heater Strap? (Earthquake Strap)

In July of this year, an earthquake struck Las Vegas, causing tremors throughout the Valley. As locals waited for the earthquake energy to subside, their homes and businesses rocked violently. It’s the last thing you’ll want to be concerned about when your house is trembling, and your water heater is no exception. When a natural catastrophe strikes, hot water heater straps can keep your unit safe and secure, minimizing damage and protecting your family. These straps are also referred to as earthquake straps or restraints in some circles.

The best course of action is to be prepared for the worst case scenario and install the straps at the same time as you install your new hot water heater.

Can a Homeowner Install a Water Heater in Nevada?

Homeowners in Nevada are permitted to install a water heater themselves as long as the house is their principal residence. For any rental properties or secondary residences, a contractor is required to get the necessary permits for the water heater installation on their behalf. Water heaters are subject to a number of stringent electrical and plumbing regulations, so it may be in your best interests to engage a qualified plumbing professional to complete the installation of the unit that you have chosen for your house.

Are Water Heater Straps Required in Nevada?

The state of Nevada does, in fact, mandate the use of water heater straps. Indeed, within one foot of a wall stud, water heaters must be secured by twin straps to prevent them from falling over. These should be installed around the heater and then linked to the frame of the unit. It is recommended that one strap be put inside the top one-third of the heater, and the second strap be installed within the bottom one-third of the heater. Allow at least 4 inches between the control knobs and the bottom strap when using this technique.

In addition to saving you time and money, working with a professional will reduce the likelihood that you may accidently damage your water heater or wall while completing the installation procedure yourself.

Water heater installation is a specialty of Plumbing Kings, and our professional plumbers are well-versed in the installation of water heaters that comply with the rigorous Nevada plumbing laws.

It is our pleasure to service all makes and models of water heaters, and you can count on our staff to always provide excellent service at a fair cost. The pleasure of our customers is our number one goal. Contact us right now to schedule an appointment with one of our friendly staff members.

Secure Your Water Heater in Case of an Earthquake

If you live in San Jose, California, you should be aware that your home is sensitive to earthquakes. After the earth has settled, you’ll want to get back to your usual routine as soon as possible, which includes having a hot shower to refresh yourself. Of course, this is only feasible if your water heater was able to withstand the shocks and shaking caused by the earthquake. Protect this important supply of fresh water in the case of a natural disaster and save costly repairs by securing your water heater before the next earthquake occurs.

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The Problem

Water heaters can tumble over in an earthquake if they are not properly braced, causing damage to rigid water and natural gas connections. If the tank ruptures, water may spill out and flood your home, and a burst gas line may result in a fire or explosion in your home. Replacing a water heater after an earthquake can cost hundreds of dollars, and repairing flood and fire damage can easily cost tens of thousands of dollars or more in some cases. All of this could be avoided if your water heater tank was properly braced and your water and gas lines were adequately protected.

Changes in Strapping Recommendations

If your tank was secured decades ago, you might believe you’re safe. However, this is not the case. Old strapping procedures, on the other hand, are prone to failure, as seen by the failure of many in the 1989 Loma Prieta (San Francisco) and 1994 Northridge (Los Angeles) earthquakes. Check the restrictions on your water heater. Not just one strap, but two, and the strapping should be made of heavy-gauge metal rather as flimsy plumber’s tape, as is the case with most other products. If your setup does not comply with these requirements, you should consult a plumber for assistance in making the required modifications.

Identifying if Your Water Heater will Survive an Earthquake

If your water heater is freestanding, you should take precautions to secure it as soon as possible. Here’s how it’s done:

  • In order to ensure that the water heater is within one to two inches of the wall, it should be placed there. If it’s more than this distance away, use long lag screws to secure a wooden block between the tank and the wall in place. Consequently, it prevents the tank from tilting backward. Purchase a water heater strapping kit from a hardware shop or consult with a plumber for assistance with the following steps: Install two heavy-gauge metal straps around your water heater’s tank, one around the top third and the other around the bottom third of the tank, and then tighten them together. If you’re working with a kit, make sure to follow the directions carefully for the best results. Make certain that the straps are connected to the studs or masonry of the wall in order to provide the most stability possible
  • Replace all natural gas and water line connections with flexible ones in order to reduce the likelihood of them breaking during an earthquake. An earthquake shutoff valve should be installed so that your natural gas service is immediately switched off in the event of a significant seismic.

Place the water heater within one to two inches of the wall and make sure it is not too close to it. Install a wooden block between the tank and the wall, using long lag screws, if the tank is more than this distance away. This helps to keep the tank from tilting backward. You may either purchase a water heater strapping kit from a hardware shop or call a plumber for assistance with the following steps: Two heavy-gauge metal straps should be installed around your water heater’s tank, one around the top third and the other around the bottom third.

Check to be that the straps are securely attached to the wall studs or brickwork for optimal stability.

An earthquake shutoff valve should be installed so that your natural gas service is immediately switched off in the event of a significant tremor;

How to Secure Your Water Heater Against an Earthquake

Your water heater should be secured properly if you reside in an earthquake-prone location to ensure that it does not tumble over during an earthquake.

As a result, while you won’t be able to recreate my configuration exactly, maybe this will serve as an inspiration to you to install, update, or at the very least double-check and validate that your system is secure.

Step 1: What an Earthquake Can Do

The majority of water heaters I’ve seen are kept in place by their own weight and, in some cases, by the water supply lines themselves. In earthquake-prone locations, this is not sufficient protection. Consider the sensation of shaking a table with a tall glass of water resting on it, or watch these videos of simulated earthquakes: see how the water heater just falls over? Maybe you’re thinking that if there’s a severe enough earthquake to knock over my water heater, I’m probably dealing with something far more serious.

As you can see in the photos, I’ve already completed the installation of a flexible gas line as well as semi-flexible water lines.

Step 2: Get a Strapping Kit

The majority of water heaters I’ve seen are kept in place by their own weight and, in some cases, by the water supply connections themselves. That is insufficient in earthquake-prone locations. Take, for example, the shaking of a table with a tall glass of water on it, or watch these videos of simulated earthquakes: see how the water heater just falls over? Obviously, if an earthquake is strong enough to knock down my water heater, I must be dealing with something far more serious. Even if that’s the case, I don’t want to add fire from ruptured gas lines and flood from ruptured water lines to the mix of dangers that already exist.

These are ribbed copper pipes with some elasticity in them, which is what the water lines are.

Step 3: Plan

Given that my water heater is positioned in a corner, I chose to link the straps to the perpendicular walls of the room and tuck the water heater into the corner as well.

Step 4: Mount the Straps

On one side of the room there is concrete, and on the other side there is drywall on studs. I used a hammer to drill holes in the concrete wall and then installed concrete anchors. I pre-drilled and placed lag screws in the stud wall to hold the framing together.

Step 5: Supports Behind the Water Heater

Because the water heater is only a few inches away from the walls, some scrap 2x4s and 2x6s were chopped to fit behind it. Using two metal buckles that are fastened to the wood structure, the metal straps are threaded through. The assembly is then held in position against the water heater by means of the straps.

Step 6: Shove the Support in Place

The wood structure beneath the water heater was finally secured after considerable wrangling and shoving on my part. I screwed in the second metal buckle while the first one was still partly in place. Once the straps were properly threaded through the buckles and their appropriate alignment was confirmed, I screwed the top 2×6 into place.

Step 7: Tighten Straps

Tighten the straps down, taking care not to overtighten them and cause damage to the water heater.

Prior to this, my water heater had some movement; it now appears to be rock solid.

Step 8: Just in Time!

This project was completed three hours after a magnitude-2.8 earthquake occurred less than three miles from my home! Although the earthquake wasn’t severe enough to necessitate using any structural bracing, it made me feel relieved to have done it.

Be the First to Share

DonHester submitted this on Sunday, May 18th, 2014 at 08:20. I’ll gladly accept a strap from you! It was necessary, but it was not enforced, and now you have to deal with the consequences of that. Fortunately, it is not difficult to make the necessary changes. This is an excellent illustration of what happens when code and enforcement hit head on with long-term effects. What exactly is it? Water heaters are subject to seismic restrictions because of this. There was a period of time in Chelan County during which the seismic restriction of water heaters was not implemented.

  1. An earthquake that was believed to be between 7 and 8 on the Richter Scale occurred on December 14, 1872, according to historical records.
  2. This resulted in a massive landslide, fissuring, and the eruption of a 27-foot geyser.
  3. Missing restraints have been something I’ve reported during my house inspections for quite some time, but now we have appraisers doing the same thing, and they have a little more effect on things, such as whether or not you receive your loan.
  4. When the bottom strap is installed, it must be at least 4″ above the water heater control unit.
  5. Both the Residential Code and the Plumbing Code include requirements that are extremely comparable to one another, according to the International Residential Code (IRC).
  6. Appliances that are intended to be permanently installed must be attached or anchored in a way that has been approved.
  7. Strapping must be placed at spots on the appliance’s vertical dimensions that are in the upper one-third and lower one-third of its vertical dimensions.
  8. This is what the UPC says: 508.2 Water heaters with seismic design categories C, D, E, and F must be anchored or strapped in order to prevent horizontal displacement caused by earthquake action.
  9. With the strapping, a space of not less than four (4) inches (102 mm) above the controls must be maintained at the lowermost position.
  10. Make sure your water heater is secure.

Wenatchee-based Red Adair NCW Home Inspections, LLC is a licensed Washington State home inspection service with offices in Chelan County, Douglas County, Kittitas County, Okanogan County and Grant County, as well as the cities of Wenatchee, Leavenworth, Cashmere, Oroville, Cle Elum, East Wenatchee, Quincy, and many other communities.

Your Professional Real Estate, Home, and Structural Pest Inspection Service in Wenatchee and Chelan, Washington www.ncwhomeinspections.com 509-670-9572

Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Sun, May 18, 2014 – 08:20 (Submitted by DonHester). Count on me to bring you a strap! It was necessary, but it was not enforced, and now you have to deal with the consequences of that decision. Unfortunately, it is not difficult to make the necessary modifications. An excellent illustration of how code and enforcement confront head on, with serious ramifications in the future. Whoa, what’s going on here! There are restrictions on water heaters because of seismic activity in the area. Water heater seismic restraints were not strictly enforced in Chelan County for a period of time during that timeframe.

  • An earthquake that was estimated to be between 7 and 8 on the Richter Scale occurred on December 14, 1872, to give you some background: A location north of Lake Chelan was suspected to be the epicenter.
  • As a result, we are in an earthquake-prone area that is highly likely to be hit by earthquakes.
  • The upper one-third of the unit, as well as the bottom one-third, must be secured with straps at at least two spots on the water heater.
  • A significant consideration is the clearances necessary between a wall and the heater, as specified on the unit’s nameplate.
  • 2 Appliances must be securely fastened to the ground.
  • If the water heater is in Seismic Design Categories D1 or D2, it must be secured or strapped in order to prevent horizontal displacement induced by seismic motion.
  • Strapping must be maintained at a minimum distance of 4 inches (102 mm) above the controls at the lowermost point of the arc.
  • It is required that water heaters in seismic design categories C through F be anchored or strapped to prevent horizontal displacement as a result of seismic movement.
  • Using the strapping, a height above the controls of not less than four (4) inches (102 mm) must be maintained at the lowermost position.
  • Water heaters should be protected.
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Wenatchee-based Red Adair NCW Home Inspections, LLC is a licensed Washington State home inspection service with offices in Chelan County, Douglas County, Kittitas County, Okanogan County and Grant County, as well as the cities of Wenatchee, Leavenworth, Cashmere, Oroville, Cle Elum, East Wenatchee, Quincy, and many other communities.

Home and structural pest inspections in Wenatchee and Chelan counties by a licensed professional. www.ncwhomeinspections.com 509-670-9572

  • Water heaters that run on electricity
  • Earthquake strapping Regarding the age of water heaters and publications on the subject
  • Gas boilers and water heaters manufactured by Laars Heating Systems are being recalled. Gas boilers and water heaters manufactured by Laars Heating Systems are being recalled.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Originally Posted bymike huntzingerstraps are necessary, but on demand or tankless options are not available. According to the 2006 IRC.-P2801.7 Seismic bracing for the water heater. The upper one-third and lower one-third of the appliance must be anchored or strapped in order to resist a horizontal force equal to one-third of the operating weight of the water heater, acting in any horizontal direction, or in accordance with the appliance manufacturer’s recommendations in Seismic Design Categories D0, D1 and D2 and townhouses in Seismic Design Category C.

Jerry Peck is a retired construction litigation consultant who may be reached at www.AskCodeMan.com.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Jerry Peck originally posted this on his blog. According to the 2006 IRC.-P2801.7 Seismic bracing for the water heater. The upper one-third and lower one-third of the appliance must be anchored or strapped in order to resist a horizontal force equal to one-third of the operating weight of the water heater, acting in any horizontal direction, or in accordance with the appliance manufacturer’s recommendations in Seismic Design Categories D0, D1 and D2 and townhouses in Seismic Design Category C.

There you have it, Jerry.

If the manufacturer’s installation instructions include information on “anchoring,” there is no need for strapping.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Dom D’Agostino first posted this message. There you have it, Jerry. Your solution. If the manufacturer’s installation instructions include information on “anchoring,” there is no need for strapping. This is true for *any* storage water heater, not just electric ones. Sorry for the confusion, but if the installation instructions for a “storage” type water heater “also” do not call for that strapping, then, by that same logic, the strapping is not required. There is no need for strapping. Because there is a “or” instead of the typical “and” in the middle of the sentence.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

In my workplace, I have one of the “instant on” or “tankless” water heaters, which works perfectly. It has four mounting (anchor) points, one at each corner, and weighs approximately 3 lbs. It is made of steel. I believe this satisfies the requirements of P2801.7. At the very least, the water heater I have should not necessitate the use of any extra anchors or strapping.” P2801.7 Seismic bracing for the water heater. Water heaters in Seismic Design Categories D0, D1 and D2 and townhouses in Seismic Design Category C must be anchored or strapped in the upper one-third and lower one-third of the appliance to resist a horizontal force equal to one-third of the operating weight of the water heater acting in any horizontal direction, or in accordance with the appliance manufacturer’s recommendations, in the upper one-third and lower one-third of the appliance.” As a result, Jerry is accurate in his statement that “I don’t see any exception in there for anything other than “storage” *water heaters*.” While at the same time, Mike is accurate in stating that “straps are necessary, but on demand or tankless are not.” To correct a smart man is to earn an ally.

You correct an idiot, and the result is that he will bleed from the nose.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

In my workplace, I have a water heater that is either “instant on” or “tankless.” With four mounting (anchor) points, one at each corner, and weighing around 3 lbs, it is a versatile piece of furniture. P2801.7, I believe, is satisfied by this solution. At least for the water heater I have, there shouldn’t be any need for any extra anchors or straps.” P2801.7 Stabilization of a water heater against earthquakes The upper one-third and lower one-third of the appliance must be anchored or strapped in order to withstand a horizontal force equal to one-third of the operating weight of the water heater acting in any horizontal direction, or in accordance with the appliance manufacturer’s recommendations, in buildings classified as seismic design categories D0, D1 and D2 and townhouses classified as seismic design category C.” “I don’t see any exceptions in there for anything other than “storage” *water heaters*,” Jerry is accurate in his assessment.

While at the same time, Mike is true in his statement that “straps are essential, but on demand or tankless are not.” ‘Correct a wise guy, and you will acquire a friend’ A idiot who corrects you will bloody his nose,’ says the narrator.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

California mandates it since the majority of the state’s population lives in seismically active areas. Check the California Building Code for the zone in which you reside and inspect, and I’m willing to wager that it will require certified strapping regardless of the manufacturer’s recommendations. When it comes to what they consider to be proper strapping, the State Architect has a pretty FUBAR instruction sheet. Jerry McCarthy is a Building Code/Construction Consultant that works in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Because the majority of California’s population lives in seismically active areas, the state demands this precaution. Take a look at the California Building Code for the zone in where your home is located and in which you conduct inspections, and I’ll bet it will require acceptable strapping regardless of the manufacturer’s specifications. When it comes to what they think to be proper strapping, the State Architect has a truly FUBAR instruction sheet. Jerry McCarthy is a Building Code/Construction Consultant that works in the San Francisco Bay area.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Gunnar Alquist originally posted this on his blog. Specifically, the bracket in question is an adjustable “Y” shaped metal bracket that attaches to the intake and outlet supply pipes located on each side of the tank’s top. However, I am not from California. What about the phrase “attaches to the inlet and outlet supply pipes”? That doesn’t seem quite right to me. During an earthquake, the weight of the tank will snap those pipes straight off, thus you should be strapping the tank itself, correct?

www.AskCodeMan.com is a website that provides construction litigation consulting services.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Jerry, That is, in fact, my point of view as well. However, because the brackets were made and (probably) tested/listed specifically for this use, they are OK. The bracket, on the other hand, is only fastened at one location, which may allow the tank to spin around that point in the event of an earthquake. To my mind, this would offer the tank greater leverage over the connection point, which would increase the likelihood of the tank breaking free.

Straps are secured in two places, which, if done correctly (which is rarely the case), would prevent lateral movement from occurring. Although it comes from hurricane-prone rather than earthquake-prone territory, thank you for your answer.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Everyone I know in California has long since embraced the DSA technique for certified seismic strapping of water heaters, which in my opinion is completely ridiculous. A photo of what they claim is a classically strapped water heater, which is clearly not the case, as well as a handful of other evident CA code violations, can be seen on their website. DSA is an abbreviation for the Department of the State Architect. Hmmmmmmm? Jerry McCarthy is a well-known actor and comedian. Consultation on building codes and construction

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Every county in California that I am aware of has long ago accepted the DSA methodology for acceptable seismic strapping of water heaters, which, in my opinion, is completely false. A photo of what they claim is a classically strapped water heater, which is clearly not the case, as well as a handful of other evident California code violations, can be seen on their website. State Architect’s Office is abbreviated as DSA. Hmmmmmmm? Jerry McCarthy is a well-known actor and producer. Consultation on the Building Code and Construction

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Every county in California that I am aware of has long since embraced the DSA procedure for authorized seismic strapping of water heaters, which, in my opinion, is a sham to say the least. Their website features a photo of what they claim is a classically strapped water heater, which is clearly not the case, as well as a handful of other evident California code violations. DSA stands for the Department of the State Architect. Hmmmmmmm? Jerry McCarthy is a well-known actor. Consultations on building codes and construction

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Every county in California that I am aware of has long ago embraced the DSA procedure for certified seismic strapping of water heaters, which in my opinion is a sham to say the least. Their website displays a photo of what they claim is a classically strapped water heater, which is clearly not the case, as well as a handful of other blatant CA code violations. DSA stands for Department of the State Architect. Hmmmmmmm? Jerry McCarthy is a well-known actor and director. Building Code/Construction Consultant

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Yes, three for a 75-gallon tank. 4 gallons for every 100 gal. two gallons for every 75 gal.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Yes, three for a 75-gallon container. There are four for 100 gal and two for anything less than 75 gal per person.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

I have access to the website; please allow me a few seconds to identify the appropriate section.

Re: Earthquake strap all water heaters?

Pagemode=nonet Here is the link to your inquiry, which states that you require three straps for 75 gallon containers.

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