How To Install Expansion Tank On Water Heater

Installing a Water Heater Expansion Tank

When used in conjunction with a pressure-limiting valve or a back-flow preventer, a water heater expansion tank serves as a safety measure to safeguard pipes and fixtures in plumbing systems. In certain cases, constructing an expansion tank is required by local building codes when installing a new water heater, while in other cases, it is a retrofit project that is carried out in order to provide additional protection to an existing water heater. An expansion chamber for accepting water that expands in volume as it is heated will be installed in a small air-filled tank above the water heater, and a splice will be made into the cold water supply pipe above the water heater to complete this project.

Beginners may wish to hire a professional plumber to complete this task, but more experienced do-it-yourselfers may complete the task in an afternoon with minimal supervision.

How an Expansion Tank Works

It is possible that an expansion tank will be necessary in some cases, and it will help your water heater survive longer. Due to the thermal expansion of water as it heats up, a closed plumbing system that does not include an expansion tank linked to the water heater may suffer damage as a result of this expansion. The volume of water grows by roughly 2 percent when it is heated from a temperature of 50 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. As the water heater tank fills with more and more water, it puts less pressure on the pipes and fixtures, lowering pressure on the water heater tank.

In the interior of an expansion tank, there is a flexible rubber diaphragm that splits the tank into two sections: one that absorbs expansion water as it heats, and another that serves as an air chamber that gets somewhat pressured as the diaphragm extends into it as it expands.

An Expansion Tank May Be Mandatory

Because water heater installation normally necessitates the use of a plumbing permit, you will learn about any expansion tank requirements when you submit an application for a permit to install the water heater. If the system does not contain some form of pressure-limiting or back-flow valve that maintains the system closed, an expansion tank is typically not necessary. Although it is not necessary by local code, if your system does include some form of limiting valve, it is a good idea to add an expansion tank, even if it is not required by the code.

Tip

The installation detailed here makes use of existing copper tubing and follows typical installation guidelines. Your installation will be different based on the size of the pipes in your circumstance and other considerations; if you’re unsure about how to continue at any time, consult with an expert for assistance.

Tools and Supplies You Will Need

  • Temperature expansion tank
  • Dielectric water heater union
  • Pipe wrench or channel-lock pliers
  • (2) 3/4-inch copper female-threaded unions
  • Pipe-sealing tape
  • 3/4-inch copper pipe
  • Additional 1/4″ copper fittings (as needed)
  • Thermal expansion tank
  • Dielectric water heater union Equipment for soldering copper flex pipes (if required)
  • Plumbing soldering equipment (if required)

Instructions (New Water Heater Installation)

When installing an expansion tank, it is often done directly above the water heater by means of a tee-fitting that is inserted in the cold water supply pipe of the system. It is customary to place the expansion tank vertically, yet it is allowed to put it horizontally if it is necessary due to space constraints. The plumbing fittings you’ll need may vary depending on the sort of plumbing pipes you have and how the expansion tank is positioned, but copper pipes and fittings are the most often used materials for the connections in this situation.

As for the expansion tank itself, it normally has a threaded fitting that is 1/2-inch or 3/4-inch in diameter, and it is connected to the cold water pipe via a swivel fitting and short lengths of either threaded or sweat-soldered pipes.

Attach a Dielectric Union

  • Installing a dielectric union at the cold water entry port of the water heater once it has been properly positioned is the next step. With pipe sealing tape wrapped over the union’s threads, insert the union into the cold water intake port on the water heater with a pipe wrench or channel-lock pliers

Attach Copper Adapter

  • Attach a dielectric union to the cold water entry port once the water heater has been properly positioned. With pipe sealing tape wrapped over the threads of the union, thread the union into the cold water inlet port on the water heater with a pipe wrench or channel-lock pliers.

Attach Tee Fitting

  • Install a short piece of copper pipe and a tee-fitting on the water heater’s dielectric union to connect it to the adapter on the water heater. In order to give adequate space for the expansion tank, the tee-fitting should be approximately one foot above the water heater. The majority of plumbers use sweat-soldering to construct these connections, although they may also be made with push-fit connections (sometimes known as “shark-bite” connections).

Attach Expansion Tank Pipe

Make an attachment to the side outlet of the tee-fitting with a short piece of horizontal copper pipe attached using sweat-soldering or push-fit connectors. However, depending on the amount of available space, it is advisable to make this copper pipe as short as possible—no more than 6 inches or so in length is recommended. Attach a female threaded adapter to the end of the horizontal pipe via sweat-soldering or a push-fit connection at the other end of the horizontal pipe.

Tip

  • When working with brass fittings and nipples, it is preferable to do so whenever feasible. Metals such as brass and copper are more effective in supporting the weight of the expansion tank. When supporting pipes from a beam, it is usually preferable to use a clevis hanger to secure the pipes.

Attach the Expansion Tank

Threaded fitting on the expansion tank: Wrap pipe-sealing tape around the threaded fitting on the expansion tank and screw it into the threaded adapter on the horizontal pipe. In most cases, hand tightening is adequate; nevertheless, extreme caution should be exercised to avoid damaging the pipes or fittings by overtightening.

Tip

  • Consider putting an additional valve before to the expansion tank, which will allow you to isolate the tank from the rest of the system in the event that it has to be replaced.

Complete the Installation

  1. Using whatever pipes and fittings are necessary, complete the installation by connecting the top outlet of the tee-fitting to the cold water supply pipe. Instead of using rigid pipes, many plumbers choose to use a copper flex line to create this connection. Likewise, finish connecting the hot-water pipes to the water heater, and then switch on the water heater, open the water valves, and test the functioning while checking for leaks.

Variations for an Existing Water Heater

When installing an expansion tank in an existing water heater, the most difficult part is figuring out where to put it. Space might become limited, and you may find yourself utilizing a variety of pipes and fittings to make place for the expansion tank. The copper flex line will often be replaced with a shorter or longer version, and extra elbows and pipes will be added to the cold water pipe as needed. In some cases, it may be required to put the expansion tank a foot or two further from the water heater, provided that it is correctly spliced into the cold water supply line.

7 Easy Steps to Install Water Heater Expansion Tank

You should install a water expansion tank in your building now that you have determined the proper size for your system’s water expansion tank. Fortunately, no specific talents are required for this procedure. To execute this activity, you will just require this tutorial and a few simple tools. You will need to purchase the tank first, though, which will require you to go to a store. A small device may be purchased for as little as $40, but bigger units might cost several hundred dollars. If you want to use the item in conjunction with a 40- to 50-gallon heater, select a 2-gallon type.

You will need to install a tee fitting above your water heater in order to get a proper fit.

How to Install Water Heater Expansion Tank

Your water heater’s water supply should be turned off. If your unit is permanently connected to a water supply line that has a shut-off valve, turn off the water flow from the supply line to your building. If your devices are powered by electricity, turn off the circuit breaker. If your water heater is powered by gas, turn off the gas supply. However, if you are unsure about how to complete this procedure, you should contact your local gas supplier for assistance.

Step 2: Bring Out Expansion Tank and Accessories

Seek for an expansion tank that will be a good fit for your unit. This may be accomplished by taking note of the heater’s dimensions before purchasing the tank.

As soon as you go to the hardware shop, you may double-check the dimensions. Don’t forget to get up some plumber’s tape as well as the tee fitting. A set of screws (1 and a half inch long) and mounting brackets should also be included.

Step 3: Confirm the Water Supply Line for Cold Water

Locate the cold water line that is horizontal to the water heater by going to the cold water line and looking for it. This line will be required in order to establish a connection with the unit.

Step 4: Install the Expansion Tank

To put the unit near to the heater, it should be placed above the pipe that feeds cool water to the unit. Mark a location on the wall where the mounting pipes will be installed and drill few holes in the wall. Attach the cold water supply line to the expansion tank and screw it in place.

Step 5: Attach the Heater Tank

Make your way to the bottom of the connection on the expansion tank and cover the area with plumber’s tape before attaching the connector to the tee fitting at the top. A wrench should be used to tighten this connection. Make sure it’s not too tight.

Step 6: Restore the Water and Power Supply to the Heater

Turn on the water supply to your heater by turning on the water valve. After that, turn on the electricity to your unit by turning on the breakers. If your heater is powered by gas, make sure the gas supply line is in good working order before turning on the gas.

Step 7: Check the Expansion Tank

By turning on the faucet, you may check the tank’s level. After that, place your palm under the faucet to check if the water is hot or cold.

How Do I Know If The Expansion Tank Is Working?

Assume that a diaphragm separates the water from the air in the expansion tank. If it is installed at the end of the water supply pipe that distributes cold water, it will function properly. Gently tap the top and bottom of the expansion tank with your fists. If the tank has a hollow sound, that means it is in great working order. If, on the other hand, you hear a thud, this indicates that water has entered the upper chamber as a result of a damaged diaphragm. Check the temperature of the tank by touching the upper and bottom portions of it.

Because it keeps cold air in the top area, you should get a sense of coldness there.

Common Questions about Installing Water Heater Expansion Tank

In some cases, yes, particularly if you’re utilizing a closed water supply system. It is, however, permissible for use in buildings with open water distribution systems. There is no need to be concerned about the expense, as it is less than $50 in total.

2. Should I Place My Expansion Tank Near the

It is necessary to repair an expansion tank that is located near a water heater. This device may be installed anywhere along the water supply line. The majority of the time, it remains attached with a T at the cold water input that provides the water heater with cold water. You can, however, place it on a portion of the cold water supply line if necessary.

3. What is the Perfect Angle for My Expansion Tank?

Fixing the expansion tank in the vicinity of a water heater is necessary. Put it somewhere along the water supply line where it will be most useful. The majority of the time, it remains fastened with a T at the cold water input that provides the water heater with hot water. Installation on a section of the cold water supply pipe, on the other hand, is possible.

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How to Install a Water Heater Expansion Tank

Despite the fact that expansion tanks are not necessary in many regions of the nation, they are one of the most beneficial water heater additions. Regardless, many homeowners and landlords choose to install this safety device in conjunction with their water heaters as a precaution. Although this isn’t the most difficult DIY project, it is a difficult one.

It’s simplest to install the expansion tank at the same time as the water heater, but that isn’t always a possibility in every situation. In order to go into depth about how to install a water heater expansion tank, let’s start with the most fundamental question: what is a water heater?

What Is a Water Heater Expansion Tank?

As a result of the operation of water heaters, thermal expansion occurs. It used to be that water heaters would discharge their waste into the public water supply. Cities now utilize a check valve to prevent this reverse discharge of water due to worries about pollution in the water supply. Installing an expansion tank on the supply pipe of a water heater might provide homeowners with relief from high pressure in their water heaters. It is the expanding water that is drawn into the expansion tank that causes it to expand thermally.

And if you require an expansion tank, this 2-gallon Watts PLT-5 is a good option.

Installing an Expansion Tank

The expansion tank can be installed on either the hot or cold side of the boiler. In this case, there is some disagreement, and your local code may demand one or the other, so verify with your building department. Having a few of pipe wrenches or open-jaw/Channellock pliers on hand can come in in while tightening or loosening the fittings. You want them to be as safe as possible. We recommend that you use galvanized* fittings since they are inexpensive, simple to install, and will perform well in this application.

Preparation

If you already have a water heater and you’re putting an expansion tank on top of it, you’ll need to empty the old water heater before proceeding. Be sure that there is adequate room above your water heater where the expansion tank can be installed before you begin your project. Unless this is a fresh building project, there is no need to drain anything, and you can go to the following section:

  1. Immediately turn off the water supply to the heater’s cold side through its mainline
  2. And Connect an appropriate-sized hose to the drain valve at the bottom of the heater and send the other end to the nearest drainage system. To relieve pressure in the water heater tank, open both the drain on the water heater and the hot side of a nearby faucet at the exact same time. Avoid opening the valve too much or too quickly, because otherwise your hose can slip away from your drain. To check for pressure, slightly open the T P valve (with caution) after a few minutes of draining has taken place. Proceed to step five if there is no such thing. Step 4 should be repeated if there is still pressure after waiting a few more minutes. Once the pressure in the water heater has been relieved, turn off the drain valve and close the faucet.

Water Heater Expansion Tank Installation in 7 Steps:

  1. Turn off the water supply to the heater’s cold side via the mainline that supplies the water. A drain hose should be connected to the drain valve at the bottom of the heater and routed to the nearest drain. In order to relieve pressure in the water heater tank, open both the drain and the hot side of a nearby faucet simultaneously. Avoid opening the valve too much or too quickly, because then your hose will slip away from the drain. To check for pressure, slightly open the T P valve (with care) after a few minutes of draining has taken place. Proceed to step five if there isn’t any. Wait a few more minutes and then repeat step 4 if there is still pressure. Once the pressure in the water heater has been relieved, close the drain valve and turn off the faucet.

*Whenever galvanized and copper or galvanized and brass come into contact, the use of dielectric unions/fittings is mandatory. If you have a limited amount of space, stainless steel fittings are preferable than galvanized fittings since stainless steel and copper/brass do not have the same problems as galvanized fittings.

The Plumbing and Water Heater Experts

Now that you’ve learned how to install a water heater expansion tank, be sure to take advantage of the discounts available on all water heater components at PlumbersStock. We have Bradford White as well as other excellent brands. Please get in touch with us if you have any queries regarding your project or about water heaters in general. Resources that are related to this topic include: Installing a Gas Water Heater: A Step-by-Step Guide Installing an Electric Water Heater – Step by Step Instructions Soldering Water Heater Pipes – Step by Step Instructions How to Wire a Hot Water Heater (with Pictures)

How to Install an Expansion Tank in Your Plumbing

Tom Lohr is a dedicated home renovation enthusiast who enjoys working on his own projects. Rather of saving money, he likes to use it to purchase new equipment and gardening materials. This is an example of a standard expansion tank. Tom Lohr is a professional photographer.

Prevent Over-Pressurization

Keep the burden off of yourself and your plumbing systems. Excessive water pressure can cause plumbing to become overworked, resulting in costly and harmful leaks. One would assume that the water pressure in your home’s plumbing system would be continuous, but this is not the case. You must have an expansion tank connected to your water supply piping in order to maintain the pressure consistent and prevent over-pressurization. The pressure varies. The optimal water pressure for a residence is around 60 PSI.

  1. When I initially examined the pressure in my city-supplied system when I purchased a vacant house, it was 125 pounds per square inch.
  2. The water was still running when I switched it back on, and one of the PEX fittings was spouting water.
  3. There isn’t much you can do about the water pressure that is delivered to your home or business.
  4. Furthermore, if your pressure is high, you should definitely consider installing one.
  5. They are very simple to put together, making it an excellent do-it-yourself project.
  6. Simply connect it to the water supply and check the pressure.
  7. If you do decide to install a pressure regulator, it would be a good idea to do so at the same time that you install a pressure gauge in your water supply line, which should be installed in line with your plumbing immediately after the pressure regulator.

Pressure gauges for PEX systems are rather affordable, and they will keep you informed about the water pressure in your plumbing system.

This is due to the fact that water expands as it warms in your hot water tank.

This was never an issue in the past.

Your home’s plumbing system was completely isolated from the city’s plumbing system, and that valve was the only item that separated the two.

Someone had the bright notion that it was possibly harmful for your home’s water to back up into the city’s water supply system.

If your pipes were tainted, the contamination might spread throughout the city and contaminate others.

Backflow preventers, which are tiny check valves that only allow water to flow in one direction, were required to be installed in residences as a result of this judgment.

The difficulty is that these backflow preventers also prevent the extra pressure in your system from being released by expanding into the city’s system, which would otherwise occur.

The answer is to incorporate an expansion tank. Installing a water pressure gauge is simple thanks to the use of PEX push connectors. Tom Lohr is a professional photographer.

Expansion Tanks Demystified

You’ve undoubtedly come across an expansion tank while working on a plumbing project. Essentially, it is a basic, compact tank that is often located slightly above the water heater and is connected to the main system through a branch pipe. If you don’t already have one, you should get one. It is simple to install, and the total cost for everything is just $70. Showering and using 10 gallons of hot water in a normal 40-gallon hot water heater tank means that you will need to replace 25% of the heater’s capacity.

  • When cold water is heated, it creates a challenge for the system.
  • Because of the backflow preventer, the excess volume has nowhere to go and is exerting a significant amount of pressure on your plumbing system.
  • An expansion tank is a small tank that is divided into two chambers on the inside by a divider.
  • One side of the expansion tank is linked to the cold water supply to your water heater, while the other side is not attached.
  • There is a little valve on the end of the tank, similar to the one that is found on a bicycle tire, that allows you to pump the chamber to the exact pressure that you require in your system.
  • A branch line connects your water heater’s expansion tank to your cold water heater’s expansion tank when the cold water being heated by your water heater expands.
  • When the pressure in your home surpasses the pressure in the air chamber side of the expansion tank, the water pressure on the other side of the tank bends the rubber wall, providing additional space for your system.
  • Installing an expansion tank is a worthwhile investment of your time and money due to the peace of mind it brings you.

1. Make a Plan

You should have a strategy in place for how you are going to run a branch line from your hot water tank’s cold water supply to the expansion tank at this time. Create a schematic and gather the fittings you’ll need to connect a line from the expansion tank to a tee-fitting that will be inserted into your cold water supply line, as shown in the illustration. The shirt fitting and the fitting for the end of the tank may be all that is required, if you are fortunate.

Typically, one or more elbow fittings are used in conjunction with the pipe. Less is more in this case. Believe me when I say that this setup makes sense. Tom Lohr is a professional photographer.

2. Choose Your Spot

It will be much easier to do this job if you already have PEX lines in your home. With copper lines, the process is a little more difficult but not insurmountably difficult. It is necessary to first choose the location where your expansion tank will be housed and mounted. It should be installed as near to the water heater as feasible, and at least 18 inches above the water heater itself. Possibly, you’ve seen some that were attached to a copper pipe that was sticking straight up in the air. This method is effective, but it is not encouraged.

Get a universal expansion tank mount instead of going through the bother of modifying your vehicle.

3. Acquire the Necessary Hardware

Additional supplies, such as fittings to connect your tank to the appropriate size water pipes in your home, teflon tape to ensure a secure connection, and at least a few fittings will be required in addition to your tank and bracket. Using PEX push-to-connect fittings will be demonstrated in depth. If you have copper pipes, you can do one of two things: either purchase all copper fittings and learn to braze them on (which is not a difficult skill to acquire), or purchase PEX push to fit fittings, which will connect to both copper and PEX pipes.

If you have galvanized steel pipes, you should carefully consider replacing them.

4. Prepare Tank and Mount Bracket

Make the work simpler by connecting the connection fitting to the end of the tank first, then wrapping teflon tape across the threads of the connection fitting. In order to connect to your tank, you’ll need a fitting with a 3/4 female on one side and your desired size of PEX or copper pipe on the other; often 12 inch. Install the bracket for the expansion tank. Before you can attach the tank, you must first mount the tank. Note: Make sure that the air valve on the other end of the water connection is easily accessible and that there is enough space to accommodate a bicycle pump.

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If your water pressure is greater or lower than 50 PSI, pump up the tank or release pressure to get the pressure to the same level as your system.

Before attaching the tank, check the pressure and make any necessary adjustments.

It is functional, but a specialized bracket is more attractive and performs better.

5. Water Supply and Tank

Turn off the water supply to your residence.

Open the faucets at the bottom of the water line to allow the pressure and water to drain out of the water pipes. Turn off the water heater in your home. Attach the expansion tank to the tank bracket using screws.

6. Add a Tee-Fitting

Place or hold a cloth precisely below the point at which you will be inserting a tee-fitting into the cold water supply line of your hot water heater. There will be some leftover water in the pipes, and it will seep out eventually. Cut the supply line at the place where you wish to install the tee-fitting to prevent it from bursting. Make use of the tee-fitting to determine how much of the line you will need to take away to make the tee fit. It won’t amount to much. Depending on how your PEX is laid out, you may be able to bend it sufficiently so that you do not need to take off a portion at all, but only a cut in the line instead.

Make a note of the direction the line between the tee-fitting and the expansion tank will be running in.

Push, crimp, or one of the other two connections on the tee-fitting will suffice.

It was necessary to use an elbow fitting to finish the connection.

7. Connect Tank to Tee

To connect the expansion tank to the tee-fitting that you installed in the hot water tank’s cold water supply line, cut a length of PEX to suit the space. Other fittings between the two will necessitate the cutting of additional PEX sections to join them as well.

8. Do a Quality Control Test

Following the completion of your connections and the establishment of a full line between the tank and the cold water supply, it is time to conduct a leak detection test. Ensure that the faucets that you opened to drain away pressure and water are still operational. Taking it slow, slowly open the valve that connects your home to the city’s water distribution system. If you see that a constant stream of water is flowing out of the faucets, turn them all off immediately. Check for leaks in all of the fittings that you previously placed.

The leaky one will require additional pressing in order to get a better connection, or crimping if you are using that sort of PEX fitting, or brazing if you are using copper pipe.

9. Restart the Hot Water

Restart the hot water tank if necessary.

Pressure Matters

This is a simple Do It Yourself project. The bracket and tank installation will be the most difficult part of the project. It seems like there is never enough space to make things simple. If you have, or if you were smart enough to install, a pressure gauge, make sure the pressure in the expansion tank matches the pressure you set in the expansion tank before. Expansion tanks are rarely given the attention they deserve. As a result of the changing pressure in your water pipes, fittings will get loose and you may ultimately have a leak.

  1. Even if you don’t have a plan for this weekend, you now know what to do next weekend.
  2. Content is provided solely for informative and entertainment reasons and should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal counsel or professional guidance in commercial, financial, legal, or technical problems, unless otherwise specified.
  3. Your posts are chock-full of excellent suggestions for individuals who like to handle things themselves.
  4. It has certainly piqued my interest, and I’m considering testing my water pressure.

The only time I’ve done this is when there is a problem with the heating system, which has been the case thus far.” On January 10, 2021, Umesh Chandra Bhatt, from Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, India, posted the following: Very well done. Excellently described.

How to Install Hot Water Heater Expansion Tank

In the case of hot water, it expands when heated, and because it is not compressible, the pressure in the pipes increases if there isn’t any more space. In order to deal with the thermal expansion of water, you must connect the extension tank to the water supply line in order to avoid excessive water pressure from building up. The consequence of excessive pressure in the conduit pipes is serious damage to couplings, fittings, and valves, as well as the water heater, and the expansion tank serves as a safety precaution.

It is possible to install on either the hot or cold water pipes; however, the location of the water heater is not important.

What You Need

In the case of hot water, it expands when heated, and because it is not compressible, the pressure in the pipes increases if there is not enough space. Water pressure can become excessive if the water supply line is not connected to an extension tank, which can be used to deal with thermal expansion of water. The consequence of excessive pressure in the conduit pipes is serious damage to couplings, fittings, and valves, as well as the water heater, and the expansion tank serves as a safety precaution in these situations.

Neither the hot nor cold water pipes are required to be modified, and the location of the water heater is not a consideration.

Install Your Expansion Tank

When you heat water, it expands, and because it is not compressible, the pressure in the pipes increases if there isn’t any more space. Installing an extension tank to the water supply line can help you deal with the thermal expansion of water and keep the water pressure from becoming too high. The result of excessive pressure in the conduit pipes is serious damage to couplings, fittings, and valves, as well as the water heater, and the expansion tank serves as a safety precaution. There are several approaches to building an extension tank, but as your plumber will tell you, the most effective is to utilize galvanized pipe.

Installing an expansion tank is a simple project that you can complete with the help of this instruction and the appropriate tools.

How to Install a Thermal Expansion Tank – Installation Tips

The following is a step-by-step explanation on how to install a thermal expansion tank in a water heating system at your house. What is it, how does it operate, and why is it vital to have one installed?

What is an expansion tank and how does it work?

The following is a step-by-step instruction on how to install a thermal expansion tank in a water heating system at your residence.

What is it, how does it operate, and why is it necessary to have one installed?

Why it is essential to install an expansion tank

In situations when the expansion tank is not fitted and pressure begins to build up, water pouring from the temperature and pressure relief valve is one of the most prevalent problems that arise (TPR valve). Because of the increased pressure, the expansion might interfere with the normal operation of the valve, resulting in energy waste, shorter unit life, and the creation of a possible safety issue. Due to the fact that water is regarded to be non-compressible, the extremely high water pressure causes far more serious complications.

How to install a thermal expansion tank – Instructions

  • Check the water pressure in your house to make sure it is enough. It should be in the vicinity of 50 PSI. Install the pressure reduction valve if the pressure is greater than 80 PSI. Verify that the pressure of the air within the thermal expansion tank is enough. Your home’s maximum water pressure should be used to determine the appropriate pressure. If necessary, use the hand pump to boost the air pressure in the room. It is advised that a thermal expansion tank be installed on the cold water line, horizontally, and in close proximity to the water heater. To construct a watertight connection, use a threaded T-fitting, Teflon tape, and a pipe wrench together. By turning on the hot water faucet, you may release the trapped air.
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How to check if the expansion tank working

We will suppose that the diaphragm in the expansion tank is used to separate the water from the air in the tank. It is connected to the cold water supply line on the cold side of the water supply line. Tap on the tank’s upper and bottom halves at the same time. When you tap on the upper half of the structure, it should produce a hollow sound. In the event that you hear a thud sound, this indicates that the top chamber is filled with water, which indicates that the diaphragm has been destroyed.

Ice cold at the faucet, where the air is placed, and warm at the bottom, where the warm water from the tank is held, are the ideal temperatures.

The reading should be in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

Sizing tips and calculators

Was it ever brought to your attention that you may utilize an internet calculator to determine the size of an expansion tank? One may be found on the westank.com website; however, you must give details such as:

  • The volume (capacity) of the water heater
  • Water that is too cold to drink
  • The maximum temperature of the outgoing water or the highest temperature of the water
  • The initial pressure exerted by the influx of water
  • Final pressure is the highest level intended

Volume (capacity) of the water heater The coldness of the approaching water; The maximum temperature of the outgoing water or the highest temperature possible; Pressure exerted by the entering water during its early stage Pressure must be applied towards the end, or the highest possible pressure

Conclusion

A DIY house project that can be completed in a short amount of time by any handyman is the installation of an expansion tank. Purchase of expansion containers is not prohibitively expensive; they typically range between $20 and $100. Aside from that, you will want copper pipes and soldering material, or galvanized pipe and fittings, for the installation. Whatever type of water supply system your home has, whether closed or open, you should install it since it will protect the system not only from thermal expansion and high pressure, but also from irreversible damage to the heater and heating system.

Related

  1. A DIY house project that any handyman can complete in a short amount of time is the installation of an expansion tank. They are reasonably priced, with prices ranging between $20 and $100 for expansion containers. Installation will also necessitate the use of copper pipes and soldering materials, or galvanized pipes and fittings. Whatever type of water supply system your home has, whether closed or open, it should be installed since the device will protect the system not only from thermal expansion and high pressure, but also from irreversible damage to the heater and heating system.

On systems with tank-style heaters, the natural expansion that happens during the heating process might put a strain on the plumbing pipes and cause them to fail. In order to reduce the potential of damage to your plumbing system caused by pressure buildup from thermal expansion, a safety mechanism known as a water heater expansion tank should be installed on your heater. Because hot water expands when heated, a tank-style water heater adds to the total amount of water in the tank with each heating cycle.

Greater pressure in your plumbing system can be caused by as little as two additional gallons of water volume, and over time, this increased load can cause damage to your water heater, plumbing fixtures, and even the water pipes themselves due to the increased weight.

By acting as an overflow vessel for the extra water volume that is generated by a tank-style water heater while heating water, a water heater expansion tank basically protects your tank-style water heater as well as your plumbing system.

Who Needs a Water Heater Expansion Tank?

In many cases, open systems are used in the construction of residences, which allows expanding water to reenter the municipal water supply system. As a result, homeowners with open systems are seldom at risk for any of the difficulties related with the surplus volume that their tank-style water heaters may generate, because the excess water just flows back into the main water supply line. Alternatively, if your house has a closed water system, the increased water pressure caused by thermal expansion can build up extremely fast and cause significant damage to the plumbing system.

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The reason for this is that most cities’ construction standards require expansion tanks to be installed in homes with closed plumbing systems.

This will avoid damage to your water heater and plumbing system.

How a Water Heater Expansion Tank Is Installed

Even though your home is equipped with an open water system, you should consider installing an expansion tank to reap the benefits of a closed system. A properly installed expansion tank, for example, can assist avoid leaky faucets and running toilets by preventing the additional built-up pressure in the system from reaching your plumbing fixtures and inflicting harm to them. It is not necessary to locate your expansion tank in close proximity to your water heater. The most often seen installation method is the use of a “T” at the cold input of the water heater.

It’s a good idea for customers who are contemplating getting a new tank-style water heater built to also seek an estimate for the installation of an expansion tank at the same time, because the advantages far exceed the time and money spent on the project.

Most makes and models of water heaters are within our scope of competence, and we provide free in-home consultations as well as upfront pricing on all of the services we do.

Expansion Tank Installation

Please keep in mind that this content may contain affiliate links. This means that, at no additional cost to you, we may gain a small profit on purchases made via our links. Everyone is aware that water heaters use a lot of electricity and create a lot of heat. As a result, when you hear about the possible problems that might arise from even the smallest fluctuation in pressure, you shouldn’t be surprised. The same is true for water expansion, which occurs when the water temperature exceeds a certain threshold.

  • More significantly, specialists frequently request that you include it in the package in order to improve safety.
  • We can’t say the same regarding how much knowledge consumers have about the expansion tanks, but it may be the case.
  • While some people believe that it is reserved for professionals, other individuals believe that it is doable for the average person without breaking a sweat.
  • However, before you can build an expansion tank adjacent to a water heating system, you must first learn a few basic concepts regarding expansion tanks and how they function.

We’ve put together this post to serve as a one-stop shop for all of your queries and concerns. The installation of an expansion tank is also covered in detail in the manual.

What Is an Expansion Tank?

When it comes to water heaters and plumbing systems, an expansion tank is just a simple safety mechanism that stops water expansion from causing damage. An expansion tank is technically a second tank that may be installed adjacent to the water heater to provide additional capacity. Before we can discuss the operation of an expansion tank, we must first discuss the concepts of water expansion and water pressure. As you may be aware, consistent water pressure is required for the proper operation of your house and plumbing appliances.

  1. If, on the other hand, the pressure is higher above the recommended limits, leaks and other problems may occur.
  2. It occurs when the water pressure rises as a result of the expansion of the pipe.
  3. The water will expand by up to 2 percent or more when it is heated by your water heater after it has been drawn from the source and heated by your water heater.
  4. Although the increased water may normally return to the source, most plumbing systems have a device to prevent back-flow from taking place.
  5. Water from the water heater tank, pipes, fixtures, and other components of the plumbing system may expand as a result of this expansion.
  6. An expansion tank, on the other hand, overcomes this problem by providing additional room.
  7. While the first portion accepts water from the water heater tank, the second section increases its pressure as the first section accepts water from the tank.
  8. It has the potential to significantly reduce leaks and other problems.

Why Having One Expansion Tank Is Important?

Are you still perplexed as to why you should purchase an expansion tank? Here is a summary of the most significant advantages you may be interested in learning about.

  • In addition to preventing damage to the water heater, plumbing accessories, and electrical outlets, a water expansion tank can also prevent damage to the water heater itself. The fact that it takes care of any excess pressure that may come as a result of thermal expansion means that you won’t have to worry about the heat hurting any of your equipment. You may already be aware that excessive pressure is harmful to one’s health and the longevity of one’s household equipment. As a result, by including a water expansion tank in the package, you may extend the life of your gadgets, particularly those that use hot water from the heater. You can also reduce the frequency with which parts need to be replaced. There are several places in the United States where possessing an expansion tank is absolutely necessary for survival. Authorities have made expansion tanks essential because we cannot forecast the issues that increased pressure may create, particularly with heavy-duty water heaters. Without a doubt, this has been done in order to extend the longevity and durability of the plumbing systems
  • From the standpoint of usability, expansion tanks can improve the consistency of water pressure across a household’s plumbing system. Even if there are issues with the water supply, the tank will be able to handle the situation. As a result, you’ll always have a convenient water pressure of 50psi available. Rest confident that even if you switch off everything, you will not be in danger.

As you can see, having an expansion tank has a number of important advantages. It’s also important to remember that water expansion tanks are not prohibitively expensive. The cheap production costs of these devices are due to the simplicity of the technology that is used. Add a sturdy expansion tank to a heavy-duty water heater that costs approximately a thousand dollars and you won’t have an issue with your purchase.

In summary, you would not be prevented from purchasing one of these gadgets because of budgetary limits. The next major step is the installation procedure, which we shall discuss in more detail later. It would also not be an issue, to provide you a spoiler notice.

How To Install Expansion Tank

Installing an expansion tank is not rocket science, but it is also not a simple task to be undertaken by a child. This means that you must use extreme caution while assembling an expansion tank. At the end of the day, if you have any leakage difficulties with your setup, you will be defeating the purpose of the tank itself. If you are unsure about any of the actions we have outlined below, you have two alternatives. 1. Contact us. One option is to seek advice from members of the online community or to read through the documentation.

An expansion tank that is installed improperly will cause more harm than benefit.

Tools and Equipment Are Necessary

  • The tank for thermal expansion, which is fresh new
  • Dielectric water heater nipple
  • Pipe sealing tape
  • Pipe wrench
  • Pipe nipple Unions with female threads of 3/4-inch copper, copper tee fittings of 3/4-inch copper, 3/4-inch copper pipe

It is possible that you may need to purchase additional equipment for plumbing and soldering in addition to these. It’s possible that you’ll wish to add a few more copper fittings as needed. As you may have observed, several of these features may help to improve the overall safety of the water heater installation as a whole. As a result, you may need to increase the number by a significant margin.

Step-By-Step Guide To Installing Expansion Tank

Depending on your needs, you might also need to invest in additional plumbing and soldering equipment. Furthermore, you may wish to include any additional copper fittings that you think you may need in the future. It is possible that you have observed that several of these aspects might help to improve the overall safety of the water heater installation. As a result, it’s possible that you’ll have to raise the number significantly.

  1. It is possible that you may need to purchase additional equipment for piping and soldering in addition to this. It’s possible that you’ll want to install some more copper fittings as needed. As you may have observed, several of these features may help to improve the overall safety of the water heater installation in your home. As a result, you may have to increase the number by a significant margin.

Due to the fact that you have finished the installation procedure, we may proceed to the quality testing stage. Before you begin testing for pressure and other parameters, you should do a thorough inspection for leaks. If you discover a leak, you may either tighten the area or apply pipe-sealing tape to prevent the leak from recurring. It is possible to switch on the complete system and check for pressure after ensuring that it is free of leaks. We recommend running quality check numerous times, especially if you are leaving the system in a remote or difficult-to-access location.

Helpful Tips During Installation

  1. It is not necessary to situate the expansion tank so near to the water heater in this case. As a result, if you do not have any restrictions on your available area, you should maintain a significant amount of separation between the tank and heater. Overall system security will be improved as a result of this
  2. Nevertheless, there is no ideal angle for installing an expansion tank. The vertical position would be preferred by many manufacturers, but upright angles would not be an issue in this case. You may also make advantage of the additional mounting brackets that come with the kit
  3. A water expansion tank can be purchased for as little as $50. However, this does not imply that you are required to adhere to the budget. Instead, it would be great if you focused on finding the most appropriate tank for your needs. After all, you don’t want to have to replace this equipment on an annual basis, do you? Unfortunately, an expansion tank is not a piece of equipment that can be installed and forgotten about. If you make significant changes to your home’s plumbing system, you should have the expansion tank inspected for safety and proper maintenance. Diffusion difficulties, for example, might be caused by the rupture of the rubber diaphragm, which is one of the most prevalent problems.

It is not necessary to situate the expansion tank so near to the water heater in this case, though. When there is no restriction on your area, you should maintain a significant amount of separation between the tank and the heater. In addition, it will improve the overall security of the system; there is no ideal angle for installing an expansion tank. The vertical position would be preferred by many manufacturers, but upright angles would not be an issue in this situation. There are more mounts included in the kit, and a water expansion tank may be purchased for as little as $50 on the internet or at certain stores.

As an alternative, it would be preferable if you attempted to obtain the most appropriate tank for your requirements.

The expansion tank in your home should be inspected for safety and proper maintenance whenever you make significant alterations to your plumbing system. Diffusion difficulties, for example, might be caused by the rupture of the rubber diaphragm, which is a regular occurrence.

Conclusion

As you can see, installing an expansion tank is not your typical happy-go-lucky do-it-yourself activity. However, with the correct tools and guidelines, the procedure would not be quite as difficult as it would appear. For this reason, before installing the expansion tank you purchased, make sure you go through all of the available information.

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