How To Unfreeze Tankless Water Heater

Cold Weather and Your Tankless Water Heater: How to Prevent Freezing

Whenever the weather becomes cold and the temperatures begin to drop, your tankless water heater is more susceptible to freezing and experiencing other weather-related problems. Whether you’re winterizing your hot water heating system as part of the process of closing down a summer cottage or you live in a region with frigid winters, your tankless system will require a little more care. If you live in a cold climate, this article will provide you with the knowledge you need to protect your tankless water heater from freezing.

Can a Tankless Water Heater Freeze?

Tankless water heaters require special attention throughout the winter months. Even water heaters that are located indoors may be susceptible to problems caused by the cold weather. The majority of manufacturer’s warranties do not cover damage resulting from freezing. A freeze protection feature is included into many units by manufacturers like as Rinnai and Rheem. This feature lets the unit to protect itself when temperatures dip below freezing. Rinnai tankless water heaters offer two layers of protection to keep them safe from the elements and prevent them from freezing in the winter.

Activated when the temperature goes into the low 30’s, these ceramic heaters help to keep the interior parts from freezing.

This technology makes use of a sensor located within the unit to identify whether or not the tankless is below freezing.

Both of these approaches will provide freeze protection for the Rinnai unit as long as the device has access to both electrical power and natural gas to operate.

How to Thaw a Frozen Tankless Water Heater

Frozen pipes and a frozen water heater are also possible consequences of cold weather. The unit should not be used if the exterior plumbing leading to the water heater has frozen, or if the water heater itself has frozen. Take the following steps:

  • TURN OFF THE ELECTRICAL POWER AND CLOSE THE GAS AND WATER OFFSHUTOFF VANES
  • Allow enough time for the tankless unit to defrost. To see if the unit has thawed, open the Water Supply Valve and check for leaks. In the event that water begins to flow, the tankless water heater has thawed. Ensure that all exterior pipes, internal components, and plumbing are thoroughly inspected for leaks. As long as everything appears to be in working order, you may open the gas and water valves and switch on the electrical power.

Protecting External Pipes from Freezing

Many homeowners overlook the need of protecting the exterior piping that leads to and from their tankless water heaters, but these pipes and valves are particularly vulnerable to freezing if they are left exposed to the elements. A pipe wrap insulation or a pipe heating cable can be used to insulate the exterior pipes from freezing, preventing a severe headache. Both approaches are straightforward, low-cost, and widely available options. Pipe heating wires are available that are approved for outdoor usage and will keep pipes from freezing at temperatures of up to -50°F (-40°C).

However, you should always read the manufacturer’s guidelines for the individual items before wrapping your pipes with heating cable and then adding pipe wrap insulation.

How to Prevent a Tankless Water Heater from Freezing

Even though your tankless water heater is equipped with built-in freeze prevention, there will be instances when you will need to drain it. You will be left helpless against the chilly conditions if you ever lose electricity, and your tankless would be at risk of freezing. For lengthy periods of time away from home, we strongly advise draining your tankless system, especially in cold areas. Despite the fact that tankless heaters may always be manually drained, installing a set of offereze protection solenoid valvesis a wonderful approach to provide you with peace of mind during the chilly winter weather.

Freeze protection solenoid valves are also known as drain down solenoid valves or “usually open” drain down solenoid valves, depending on how they are configured.

When there is a power outage, the valves on the tankless water heater automatically open and release the water stored within the tank.

Even if you decide not to install this additional layer of safety, it is recommended that you take the steps below to safeguard your tankless water heater in the case of a power loss during the winter:

  • Pump Drain Plug should be manually opened or removed. Remove the plug from the Condensate Trap Drain
  • Remove the plug from the Water Drain

Drain Down Solenoid Valves from Rinnai It is highly recommended that you install a freeze prevention solenoid valve kit on your outdoor unit in order to prevent the unit from being frozen.

How to Manually Drain Your Tankless Water Heater

If your tankless unit does not have the freeze prevention solenoid valve kit installed, you will have to manually drain the unit whether you are draining it because of cold weather conditions or for another reason. Manually draining the tankless heater is more difficult, but it is just as effective at removing the water from the tankless heater’s inside. The following steps will show you how to manually empty your tankless water heater:

  • Immediately shut off the cold water supply and switch off the gas supply. To turn off the temperature control, turn it off on the wall. The electrical power to the water heater should be turned off
  • We recommend that you turn on a hot water tap or faucet inside the residence first. This will assist in reducing the pressure within the heater
  • A bucket should be placed beneath the water heater to collect the water
  • Remove the Drain Caps from the Hot and Cold Isolation Valves and OPEN the valves to allow the water to flow through. Because the hot water is under pressure, it has the potential to “blast out” of the unit. Caution should be exercised since the water may be heated. REMOVE the Cold Water Inlet Filter from the system. Drain plugs should be removed from your tankless water heater if they are present. Each of these drain plugs is positioned on the bottom of the tankless unit: the water drain plug, the pump drain plug, the condensate trap drain plug, and the hot water drain plug.

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When you’re ready to begin utilizing your tankless water heater, you’ll need to switch it back on so that it can resume regular functioning. This is a relatively simple method that is essentially the inverse of the draining procedure described above. Here’s what you should do:

  • Check to make sure that all of the drain plugs have been removed from the unit, that all of the hot water taps/faucets have been turned off, and that the gas supply has been turned off. Replace the drain plugs for the water, the pump drain plug, and the condensate trap drain plug. Replace the Check Valve Drain Plug with a new one. Replace the cold water inlet filter and re-open the cold water supply valve to allow the water to flow. This will allow the tankless unit to fill with water
  • However, it is not required. DON’T forget to turn on the hot water tap or faucet inside the house. You can close the tap/faucet if water is flowing from the tap/faucet, which indicates that the tankless water heater is functioning properly
  • Otherwise, you can leave the tap/faucet open. In order to use the tankless heater, turn on the electrical supply. Check to make sure that the Temperature Controller is turned off. Activate the natural gas supply
  • The Temperature Controller should be turned on.

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It’s not suggested to use this approach for lengthy periods of time, such as vacations, but it can be useful in an emergency situation when there is a power outage or the temperature dips beyond the unit’s capacity to freeze protect itself. Running a small amount of water through a tankless water heating system will help to keep the heater and external pipework from being iced over. Take the following steps:

  • Turn off the electrical power to the tankless water heater
  • Close the gas supply valve
  • And turn on a hot water tap or faucet anywhere in your home to test the water temperature. It is recommended that the water flow at a rate of one-tenth of a gallon per minute, or that the water stream be. The breadth is 20 inches.

How to Winterize a Tankless Water Heater

Consider winterizing your tankless water heater if you have a vacation home or intend to be away during the winter months. This is a preventative measure to keep the unit from freezing. Cold weather conditions may develop fast, and preparing for them in advance can spare you from a significant amount of stress. Please bear in mind that these instructions are intended to serve as a reference only, and that your specific tankless water heater may have different needs than those outlined here. You should always refer to your heater’s owner’s handbook for detailed instructions on how to use it.

Make certain that they will guarantee their services and will reimburse you for any fees incurred if the project is not completed appropriately. Taking thorough notes will ensure that you know exactly what to do next year! Here’s what you should do: Natural Gas Availability

The Provision of Water

  • The cold water supply to the tankless water heater should be turned off. Pour water out of the unit by turning on the freeze prevention (drain down) solenoid valves on the cold and hot water lines
  • Start by turning on a few of hot water taps throughout the home. Remove the intake filter from the cold water line and set it aside. Remove any plugs or inline filters that may be present on the hot water side of your tankless system to allow for expansion if there is any water within the lines that freezes.

Remove the power supply to your tankless water heating system by disconnecting it or setting the circuit breaker to “off” position. In the event of a power surge or loss, this will safeguard the tankless water heater from being damaged. Ventilation System- If it is possible to reach the end of the vent safely, cover both the intake and exhaust vents with a cover. Debris, leaves, and even tiny animals like squirrels will be prevented from being stuck within the vent and producing air flow troubles when it’s time to use your tankless water heater once more.

How to Prevent A Frozen Tankless Water Heater

When it comes to tankless water heaters, cold weather can be a hindrance. These animals frequently require more attention in order to avoid having weather-related ailments such as freezing. The presence of this issue in classic tank-style water heaters is uncommon, but it is one that may be avoided with regular water heater maintenance. Due to the fact that most manufacturers do not cover damage caused by freezing under their warranties, it is critical to give your tankless system a little more attention throughout the winter months.

Protecting Your Tankless from Cold Weather

When it comes to cold weather, many homeowners are concerned about their outdoor tankless water heaters, but it’s also crucial to keep a watch on inside tankless water heaters. Because even indoor tankless water heaters might suffer problems during the colder months of the year! Other Preventative Measures can be found by clicking here. It is explained in this post how to prevent your tankless water heater from freezing and what to do if it does freeze in this article.

How to Protect Your Tankless from Freezing

A easy and economical method of protecting the exterior piping and valves of your tankless water heater is to first insulate the external pipes using a pipe heating cable, followed by the addition of pipe insulation. There are a wide range of various things available to purchase. A built-in thermostat is also included in certain models, which is meant to heat the pipes when temperatures dip close to freezing. These pipe heating cables are affordable, and they might provide you with additional protection against a major problem.

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The ability to enable your tankless water heater to just pump a small volume of water through the device is useful in some situations. However, we do not advocate employing this approach in cases where it will be utilized for longer periods of time, such as a vacation or a long business trip. This feature might be useful if there is a power outage and the temperature rises over the point at which the device can freeze protect itself.

  • Turn off the electricity
  • Close the gas supply valve
  • And turn on a hot water faucet anywhere in your home to test the system. Install a faucet that will flow at a rate of 1/10th of a gallon per minute (or the breadth of the water stream should be.2 inches).

Built-in Freeze Protection

Higher-end brands and models are frequently equipped with some form of built-in freeze prevention within their appliances.

Rinnai is a fantastic example of this, since they have built in two lines of protection into their forces to protect them from attack.

  • On the heat exchanger, water pipes, and other internal sections of Rinnai units, ceramic heaters are used to heat the water. As soon as the temperature dips into the low 30’s, these heaters will begin to function
  • If the temperature lowers too quickly, or if the ceramic heaters fail to ignite for any reason, Rinnai has a backup mechanism in place to keep you warm. An internal sensor in the tankless will activate if the internal temperature of the tankless goes below freezing temperature. Afterwards, it will automatically turn the device on for a few of seconds. When the water within the unit reaches around 58 degrees, the system will cycle on and off until there is no longer a concern of freezing
  • However, this may take many hours.
See also:  How Much Is It To Replace A Hot Water Heater

With power and natural gas readily accessible, the Rinnai tankless system is well protected against the threat of freezing temperatures. If there is no access to power or natural gas, manual freeze prevention should be employed.

How to Winterize Your Tankless

Winterizing your tankless water heater is a good preventative strategy, especially if you will be away from home during the winter. Weather may change quickly, and sudden ice, snow, and freezing storms can be particularly concerning if you are not in a position to take the necessary preparations at the time. Always refer to your water heater’s owner’s handbook for exact instructions on how to use your unit. These instructions are intended to serve as a broad guideline only. It’s possible that your unit has different needs.

Gas Supply

  • The cold water supply to the tankless water heater should be turned off. The unit should be drained by opening the drain down (freeze protection) solenoid valve located on the cold and hot water pipes. OPEN a number of hot water faucets around the home
  • REMOVE the inlet filter from the cold water line
  • REMOVE the plug or inline filter from the hot water line to allow for expansion if there is any water remaining in the pipes that freezes
  • OPEN numerous hot water faucets throughout the house (Not all systems are constructed with these fittings on the hot water line, and not all systems have them.)

Electric Supply

  • Turn the unit’s power off by pressing the power button. The unit may either be unplugged or the circuit breaker can be turned off, depending on how your system is configured. Your tankless water heater will be protected if there are any power spikes or outages.

Vent System

  • If you are able to access the intake and exhaust vents safely, cover the ends of the vents with a cover. Leaves and trash (and, on sometimes, squirrels) are drawn into the vent and become stuck. When it comes time to restart your tankless water heater, air flow concerns might arise.

You might want to think about hiring a plumber to take care of winterizing your tankless water heater for you. Make certain that he will guarantee his services and reimburse you for any fees incurred if things aren’t performed properly. As an extra benefit, you’ll be able to take thorough notes and complete the task yourself the following year with confidence! Check with your local plumber and get FREE estimates today.

How to Drain a Tankless Water Heater

Even though a tankless water heater is equipped with built-in freeze prevention, it is occasionally required to drain the unit. For those who are without power or who are about to travel for a lengthy period of time, it’s a good idea to empty their unit, especially if they reside in a cold-weather location. These systems can be drained manually, as we’ll discuss more below, but if freeze protection solenoid valves have been fitted, the process is made considerably simpler. Drain down solenoid valves are a type of freeze protection solenoid valve that is also known as drain down solenoid valves.

When the power is disconnected, the valve automatically opens, allowing the device to be completely drained.

If your device does not already have these valves, we strongly advise that you install them.

In the event that your tankless system is in risk of freezing, freeze protection solenoid valves will automatically release the water stored in the tankless system.

How to Manually Drain a Tankless Water Heater

The manual draining of your tankless system will be required if your tankless system does not have freeze prevention solenoids installed. Manual draining is more difficult, yet it is just as effective as automatic draining. Here’s what you should do:

  • Shut off the natural gas and the cold water supplies. The temperature control should be turned OFF. CONNECT the electrical power to the breaker box. Make sure there is an empty bucket under the water heater. To open the hot and cold isolation valves, remove the drain caps from the hot and cold isolation valves, and then replace the drain caps. Because the hot water that will be discharged will be under pressure, proceed with caution. (Opening a hot water tap before opening the valves will assist in reducing the water pressure.) REMOVE the cold water inlet filter and any drain plugs located on the bottom of the unit
  • REPLACE the cold water inlet filter and any drain plugs located on the bottom of the unit.

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Check with your local plumber and get FREE estimates today.

How to Return a Tankless to Normal Operation

Once the threat of cold weather has passed, it is time to put your tankless water heater back into service. To do so, follow the steps outlined below:

  • Examine to make sure that all hot water faucets are CLOSED and that the gas supply is turned OFF. REMOVE AND REPLACE ALL DRAINS PLUGS drain plugs (for water, pump and condensate trap) are included in the package. REPLACE the check valve drain plug
  • REPLACE the cold water intake filter
  • REPLACE the check valve drain plug. A hot water tap should be opened to ensure that water is flowing through the unit. OPEN THE COLD WATER SUPPLY VALE AND ALLOW THE UNIT TO FILL WITH WATER
  • OPEN THE COLD WATER SUPPLY VALE AND ALLOW THE UNIT TO FILL WITH WATER Then turn OFF the water supply. Activate the electrical power supply
  • Examine whether or not the temperature controller is set to the “OFF” position. In order to use the gas supply, you must first turn on the thermostat.

How to Thaw a Frozen Tankless Water Heater

Cold weather may not only cause the piping running to and from your tankless unit to freeze, but it will also cause chaos because the interior elements of the unit may also get frozen as a result of the cold weather. Here’s what you should do:

  • NOTICE: DO NOT TURN ON THE WATER HEATER. Remove electrical power from the system, and then CLOSE the gas and water cutoff valves. Wait for the tankless unit to come to room temperature. DISCONNECT the water supply valve. It indicates that the unit has thawed when water begins to flow through the valve. Check for leaks in the exterior plumbing as well as the interior components and pipes. If you see a leak, you should contact a licensed plumber immediately. Assuming everything appears to be in working order, OPEN the gas and water valves and TURN ON the electrical power.

Check with your local plumber and get FREE estimates today.

How do you unfreeze a tankless water heater? – Firstlawcomic

How to Restore the Function of a Frozen Tankless Water Heater

  1. NOTICE: DO NOT TURN ON THE WATER HEATER. Remove electrical power from the system, and then CLOSE the gas and water cutoff valves. Wait for the tankless unit to defrost before continuing. Check for leaks in the exterior plumbing as well as the interior components and pipes. If you see a leak, you should contact a licensed plumber immediately.

Do tankless water heaters have freeze protection?

The majority of indoor and outdoor tankless water heaters are equipped with built-in freeze protection against temporary winter temperatures ranging from -5 degrees Fahrenheit to -22 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the manufacturer. This type of protection cannot tolerate prolonged exposure to temperatures below freezing.

Is the Rinnai tankless water heater has no hot water?

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Where is freeze protection on Rinnai Water Heater?

Higher-end brands and models are frequently equipped with some form of built-in freeze prevention within their appliances. Rinnai is a fantastic example of this, since they have built in two lines of protection into their forces to protect them from attack. On the heat exchanger, water pipes, and other internal sections of Rinnai units, ceramic heaters are used to heat the water.

How to prevent a frozen tankless water heater?

OPEN a hot water faucet anywhere in your home. Set the faucet to flow at a rate of one tenth of a gallon per minute (or whatever the breadth of the water stream should be). 2 inches in height). Higher-end brands and models are frequently equipped with some form of built-in freeze prevention within their appliances. Rinnai is a fantastic example of this, since they have built in two lines of protection into their forces to protect them from attack.

What kind of water heater has no hot water?

The tankless water heater from Rinnai has frozen. There is no hot water. V65. Gas. The tankless water heater from Rinnai has frozen. There is no hot water. click here to find out more PatrickJ1021 is a master plumber that works in the construction industry.

Defrosting a Water Heater

The thawing of a frozen water heater should be done gradually and with caution. The freezing of pipes is not unheard of during the winter months when the temperatures are below freezing. Despite the fact that water heaters are less likely to freeze since they often have hot water running through them, you may find yourself with a frozen water heater if you kept the heater turned off for an extended period of time when the outside temperature was below freezing. When it comes to thawing out your water heater, be patient; it will take some time.

Step 1

Check to see if the water heater itself is frozen, or if it is only the pipes flowing into and out of the unit that are causing the problem. This is likely to be the case on a regular basis.

Alternatively, you may verify by just touching the water heater and looking for the place where the water is ice cold. Make use of a space heater or other heating element to impart indirect heat to the frozen region until it begins to thaw out completely.

Step 2

Check for ruptured water pipes. Because water expands when it freezes, if there isn’t enough room within the heater to handle this expansion, it’s possible that the pipes have burst. As a result, once the pipes thaw, you’ll be dealing with a puddle of water on your hands. In order to defrost the pipes of your heater, it’s a good idea to discover where the water shut-off valve is located.

Step 3

You should immediately turn off any water or gas supplies to the water heater if you suspect that the entire unit has frozen over (and if defrosting frozen pipes does not restore functionality to the unit). Remove the unit from the wall and store it in a garage or other out-of-the-way location. If it explodes during the thawing process, you won’t have a messe in the midst of your house to clean up.

Step 4

Prepare the area by heating it to allow the frozen water to thaw. Turning on a space heater should take care of the problem quickly.

Step 5

Drain the water heater as soon as the ice begins to melt. To accomplish this, just turn off the water supply to the heater and then open the little drain valve found towards the bottom of the tank, as seen in the photo.

Step 6

Allowing air to enter the tank can be accomplished by opening a hot faucet or an air release valve located on the unit. The water will be able to flow out when it transforms back into a liquid once more.

Step 7

Before re-connecting the unit to the water supply, thoroughly inspect it to verify that there are no fractures caused by the expansion of the water.

Tip

Install pipe insulation or wrap your pipes with electric heat tape to avoid a repetition of this scenario. In addition, avoid attempting to defrost your water heater by simply turning it on to its maximum heat setting; homes have been known to catch fire when the heating components in water heaters get overheated as a result of ice accumulating in the heaters.

When It’s Cold Outside, Will My Outdoor Tankless Hot Water Heater Still Work?

A tankless water heater has significant limitations, yet it nevertheless performs admirably throughout the colder months of the year. When it comes to winterizing a tankless hot water heater, the answer is yes. It is correct to say “Yes.” Tankless water heaters utilize a condenser to pre-heat the water, which reduces the amount of time it takes for the water to reach the temperatures that have been pre-set for hot water flow. The water is heated to the desired temperature at a rate of around 1.6 gallons per minute, according to the property owners.

  1. It is a widespread misconception that the temperature of the hot water generated by a tankless water heater is limited by the temperature of the surrounding environment.
  2. The response is, once again, “Yes.” Even yet, if certain measures are not followed when the temperature drops below a particular threshold, the tankless hot water heater may freeze.
  3. This type of protection cannot tolerate prolonged exposure to temperatures below freezing.
  4. The first step in winterizing your tankless water heater is to switch off the device and unhook it from its power supply.
  5. Reduce the water pressure and unplug the water pipes from the water heater to avoid damage.
  6. Following that, when constructing a concentric or dual vent system, make sure that the vent pipes are facing away from the wind to avoid freezing.
  7. Ensure that gas-powered appliances have enough combustion air to avoid negative draft from freezing the water in a tankless unit, or employ a backdraft reducer, which seals the backdraft flapper, to prevent negative draft from occurring.
  8. These procedures can help you maintain your hot water heater operational throughout the winter, even when the outside temperature drops below freezing.

If the temperatures drop for a brief period of time, you may not need to take any action. During the winter months, if it is anticipated that the weather will remain cold for an extended amount of time, call a professional to winterize your tankless hot water heater.

Maintaining Tankless Water Heaters in Freezing Temperatures

Tankless water heaters are often positioned on the exterior of the home, against the wall. Tankless water heaters might be particularly sensitive to damage in cold weather as a result of this. While tankless water heaters do not have the capacity to store significant volumes of water like tank water heaters, they are nonetheless susceptible to freezing in cold weather conditions. The freezing temperatures that might occur in a tankless water heater during cold weather may cause you to be concerned.

  • The built-in electric heaters must be connected in order to operate, and they will not operate during a power outage.
  • We can assist you!
  • The electric freeze prevention will not protect outside pipes or other components that are not directly connected to the tankless water heater.
  • For more information, please see our post on the best ways to keep your tankless water heater functioning while there is no power available.
See also:  How To Install A Tankless Water Heater In An Rv

How a Tankless Water Heater can Freeze

Water in tankless water heaters that are located outside is susceptible to freezing when standing water within the heater is exposed to wintry weather and the freezing temperatures that come along with it. The majority of indoor and outdoor tankless water heaters have built-in freeze protection against freezing temperatures that kicks in when temperatures drop into the low 30s Fahrenheit and range from -5 to -22 degrees Fahrenheit over a short period of time. As previously stated, most tankless water heaters have built-in freeze protection against freezing temperatures.

If your tankless water heater is beeping, it is possible that there is a problem with the internal components as a result of the freezing temperatures.

Because water expands when it freezes, a tankless water heater that is exposed to cold weather will not only cease operating, but the expanding water may also cause damage to the inside components, resulting in you having to pay for an expensive repair or replacement.

6 Tips to Keep Your Tankless Water Heater from Freezing

When it comes to dealing with a frozen water heater, prevention is always the best method to employ.

Because most tankless water heaters have built-in freeze prevention, this is not a concern. When these protection measures fail or malfunction, you are at danger of suffering from freezing damage.

Install your water heater in a warm area

While it may not always be practical, placing your water heater in a warm location is the most effective approach to prevent it from freezing. Even though it is preferable to stay indoors and away from the harsh winter weather, an outdoor heater may be properly positioned to help alleviate the affects of the cold. Here are a few suggestions about where to locate outdoor water heaters:

  • Place the water heater away from the wind, which will reduce the impact of wind chill on the water heater’s performance. Fences and barriers may be used to stop the wind, or you can install the heater inside of a large hole to protect it from above-ground wind gusts. Install vent terminations that are wind-resistant in their operation
  • And

Run a small stream of water through the tankless water heater

Water will normally only freeze if it is left standing for an extended period of time. If you run a tiny, consistent stream of water through your tankless water heater, you may considerably minimize the likelihood of your tankless water heater freezing. It doesn’t have to be much – 0.1 to 0.2 gallons per minute should be plenty to keep the water from freezing in the pipes. By turning on a tap that is slightly out of the way, you can achieve this goal. While this may result in a slight increase in your water bill, the savings from avoiding an expensive water heater repair charge will more than offset the increased expense.

Use of the built-in electric heaters

Several tankless water heaters are equipped with built-in electric freeze prevention heaters, which prevent standing water from freezing and turning into ice. In order for these heaters to be effective when they are in perfect working order, you must first ensure that they are connected to an electrical outlet with a dependable power supply. They will not function if they are not connected to an external source of electricity. Electricity outages are widespread during periods of high low temperatures or after winter storms.

The installation of a backup battery power supply for your tankless water heater is yet another option to consider.

Furthermore, freeze prevention heaters are only effective down to temperatures as low as -22 degrees Fahrenheit, at the most.

Winterize the tankless water heater

Whether you’re dealing with a water heater at a vacation home that goes out in the middle of winter or a power outage in cold weather, if you’re going to be away for a lengthy amount of time, you should drain the water from the heater. It will completely avoid the possibility of standing water freezing and causing damage to the internal components. You’ll also save money that would have been spent on preventative measures if you had done nothing. Some tankless water heaters are equipped with solenoid valves that provide freeze prevention.

Ice protection solenoid valves are always “open,” and electricity is required for them to close in order for the valve to close. During a power outage, the valve automatically opens and empties the tankless water heater, saving energy.

How to manually drain your tankless water heater

If your tankless water heater does not have a freeze prevention solenoid valve kit installed, you will have to manually empty the system in order to prevent it from freezing. To manually empty your tankless water heater, follow these steps.

  1. Turn off the gas and cold water supplies
  2. Turn off the electricity. The temperature control panel should be turned off. The electrical power to the water heater should be turned off
  3. To alleviate pressure in the pipes, turn on the hot water faucet at a sink within the home before turning on the valves. A bucket should be placed beneath the water heater to collect the water
  4. The drain caps on the hot and cold isolation valves should be removed. Open the hot and cold isolation valves, if necessary. Remove the cold water intake filter as well as any drain caps located at the bottom of the water heater and set them aside.

Tankless water heater maintenance may be done at the same time as winterizing.

Install a hot water recirculation system

For those who live in a very chilly region, it can be worthwhile to consider installing an air circulation system. The majority of the time, these systems are designed to give an instant source of hot water at a specific spot. However, they also continually engage both your water heater and your pipes. However, while this will protect your heater and pipes from freezing, the added expenditure is likely not worth it for most people. Other advantages of a recirculation system include minimizing the amount of time it takes hot water to reach the fixtures that are the furthest away from the tankless water heater.

Insulate your water supply pipes

Water does not only pass through your water heater; it also passes through other things. Your pipes are also at risk of freezing, and they do not have the freeze prevention devices that are included in the majority of tankless water heaters. When it comes to pipe insulation, there are a few materials you can use to protect your pipes from freeze damage that are not as expensive as other options.

  • Insulation made of heat tape, polyethylene insulation, and fiberglass insulation

What to do if Your Tankless Water Heater Freezes?

It might be a little frightening to wake up to a tankless water heater that seems to be frozen. When it’s chilly outside, having access to hot water is very crucial, yet that also happens to be the time of year when your water heater is most prone to freeze. Consequently, if you turn on the water faucet in the middle of winter and nothing but ice-cold water comes out, there’s no need to get too worked up. There’s a considerable probability that your water heater isn’t really frozen in the first place.

Check the water supply pipes

When you have no hot water, the first thing to look for is a leak in the pipes. Your water heater’s pipes flowing into or out of it are considerably more prone to freeze than the heater itself. The most likely location to discover a frozen pipe is the area where they enter and exit your home. It is important to examine this piece of piping for frozen standing water before proceeding with any other work since it is the most exposed to the environment and cold wind gusts that can cause water to freeze.

When frozen water expands, it has the potential to cause significant damage to most traditional plumbing materials.

All of the above methods, including using a hairdryer, space heater, or heat gun, will swiftly defrost the water.

Increase the temperature on your thermostat and open up any sections that contain pipes to allow the heat to reach them.

Closets, cupboards, and storage rooms are examples of popular places where pipes can be found. Using a combination of local heat (a stream of air directed at the frozen piece) and global heat (your home’s heating system) should be sufficient to defrost practically any frozen pipes you come across.

Check the condition of your tankless water heater

If the pipes appear to be thawed and functioning as intended, you should inspect the water heater for problems. A frozen heater is only likely to occur if you have experienced a prolonged power outage or if you have left the heater turned off for an extended length of time. As a result, it is unlikely that a frozen heater would result in a rapid loss of water pressure. Having said that, it is still feasible, and it is something you should investigate more. The quickest and most straightforward approach to determine whether or not your heater is frozen is to open the drain valve.

If the tank is turned on and appears to be working, but no water is draining from the drain valve, there is a good likelihood that the heater has been filled with frozen water.

When water freezes, it can do serious damage to the internal components of your heater, making it more cost effective to simply replace the damaged components rather than hire a professional to fix them.

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Why Is My Tankless Water Heater Not Hot?

Taking a lengthy, hot shower after a long, chilly day is a welcome relief during the winter months. There’s nothing more frustrating than stepping into the shower and discovering that the water is ice cold. Tankless water heaters are designed to heat water rapidly, preventing you from experiencing problems such as running out of hot water. In the event that your tankless system does not heat up, what does this mean? When it comes to winterizing tankless water heaters, we get a lot of inquiries here at Rocksteady Plumbing.

Signs Your Heater Isn’t Working

There are a variety of indicators that your tankless water heater isn’t performing as it should, or that your pipes have frozen, including the following:

  • While you’re attempting to run hot water, you’re getting cold water
  • Strange sounds emanating from the pipes
  • There is no water coming from the pipes

Avoid forcing your tankless water heater to work if it isn’t heating the water properly. It is possible that your pipes may need to be thawed before you can properly utilize the system. We recommend that you see a plumber about thawing frozen pipes. If it is not a pipe issue, but rather a tankless water heater issue, contact your heating and conditioning or plumbing professionals to have someone come out and inspect the heater.

Other than winter frost, there may be another factor contributing to the tankless heater’s failure to perform as it is supposed to. It’s always preferable to leave it to the professionals when it comes to dealing with your heater in order to avoid damaging the system.

Freezing Weather Leads to Frozen Water

The freezing temperatures that occur throughout the winter months might cause difficulties with the pipelines and water heaters. During the night, when homeowners turn down the heat and don’t run the water as frequently, this sort of weather can be very troublesome for them. Aside from power outages and lengthy vacations, tanks can also become frozen if the water is not circulated through the system properly. Winterizing your tankless water heater is particularly crucial for cabins and rental houses, among other places.

See also:  How Long Does It Take To Heat A 40 Gallon Water Heater

This causes your pipes and heater to freeze while the heat is turned off and the plumbing isn’t used on a consistent basis.

When the electricity goes off, the valves function by emptying the water from your tank.

  • Drain Your Tankless Heater: Before you begin winterizing your tankless heater, you should drain all remaining liquid from the unit before it has a chance to freeze. To do so, just switch off the water, gas, and temperature control valves on the meter. Remove the heater from your electrical system and place a bucket underneath it to capture any water that may have accumulated. Also, remove the drain cap. The water should start to flow into the bucket as soon as the valves are opened, the intake filter is removed, and the drain stopper is removed. Turning off the water heater for the season is simple: If you are not at home, there is no need to leave your heater turned on. Follow the methods outlined above, but do not allow the gas or water to run again. Instead, keep everything unattached so that the heater does not have to replenish and so does not freeze. Wait until you’re ready to use your heater again before putting it away. Re-activating your heater consists of the following steps: Replace the plugs in the water drain, pump drain, and condensate trap, as well as the valve drain plug and intake filter, once they have been removed. Open the cold and then hot water taps, and then switch on the electric power to the heater to get it started. Start the engine by pressing the gas pedal (make sure your temperature control is still off when you turn on gas). Once the gas is turned on, simply turn on the temperature control and you’re ready to go.

When temperatures dip to such low levels that tankless heaters are unable to operate, your pipes and plumbing may also freeze. For added protection, consider wrapping pipes with insulation or heating cable. Heating cable is a particularly cost-effective solution that provides protection down to minus 50 degrees Celsius. For assistance with protecting or wrapping external pipelines, we recommend that you call a plumber for assistance.

Call Us Today to Learn More

Tankless water installation services are provided by Rocksteady Plumbing, a major supplier in San Luis Obispo County and the neighboring communities. Interested in learning more about Rocksteady Plumbing and the water heater services we provide? To talk with a member of our team, please contact us now. Please contact us with any questions or comments you may have, whether you’re a new or returning client.

Protection during freeze for Rinnai tankless

by Duncan(San Antonio, Tx, USA)I have exterior mounted Rinnai tankless water heater.What is the recommended protection for the unit during sustained freezes?I have the lines wrapped but should I cover the unit witha large thick blanket?

Comments for Protection during freeze for Rinnai tankless

Average RatingClick here to add your own comments
Jan 18, 2018Rating Rinnai Tankless Water Heaterby: KenBI’m trying to answer that same question.There is not enough clearance inside the box to put any real insulation. Take a look at your Rinnai manual. It says not to obstruct air flow. My Rinnai has a horizontal vent near the top on a front that certainly can’t be covered by any exterior homemade insulation framework.The tag on the side of my Rinnai specifically says it must be mounted outside. It does not say that it can only be used in Miami or placed that don’t get cold. We should have been warned of this freezing flaw in the design. This, it seems to me, is an engineering fault that Rinnai ought to address, with some recommended solution.Please post any remedies you find at this site, and I will do the same. Good luck!KenB North Carolina
Jan 17, 2018Rating Rennai Tankless Water Heaterby: Ken BenwayKJ:Many thanks for those options. In fact, on cold nights, I’m using the alarm clock method, and it has worked well so far. Many thanks.Ken B. North Carolina
Jan 17, 2018Rating Freeze Protectionby: KJIf your system was installed with drain valve(s) on the inlet and outlet as well as isolation (shut off valves) on both sides then you can actually shut off the feed valve (cold) and outlet valve (hot) and then open the drain valves thus allowing the unit to be drained of water.Once back above freezing or next morning when up and around using water, you can close the drains, open the inlet and outlet and should be able to get flow as long all lines/valves to and from heater have been protected against freeze temp so they can be operated.Alternately, one could set an alarm every few hours during night, get up and let the water flow long enough to get hot water for a couple minutes thus insuring that the lines will not freeze inside the heater.
Jan 07, 2018Rating Rinnai Tankless Heater Freeze – Central North Carolinaby: Ken BenwayLow temps ranging from 1 – 10 F. last two nights, and no hot water.When outside temps reached 25 F. Today used the hair dryer to try to thaw things out. Began getting weak flow with hot water in shower on full. May not be creating enough demand to kick in the heating element.Will let faucet flow for now and see if it will improve. Will take this and other comments adjacent to my heating guy (this has happened before). This appears to be a design flaw by Rinnai, one that by these comment dates seems to be long-standing. Do other manufacturers have fewer freeze problems? Suppliers and installers need to inform the consumer, and then squeeze Rinnai for a remedy, it seems to me.Class action suit anyone?
Dec 16, 2011Rating How to protect Rinnai water heater from freezingby: AnonymousYour Rinnai water heater is protected as long as the outside temperature doesn’t drop below -4 F or -20 C. If you have bad wind-chills as we have in Michigan, your Rinnai tankless unit, even with the internal freeze protection will be affected even with the temperatures slightly above these ones.Every Rinnai tankless water heater is equipped with the freeze protection feature that includes the electric heating elements. As long as the unit is connected to the power, you water heater is protected.Rinnai water heater is tankless, but it doesn’t mean that it is empty. It has some water inside the internal piping and the heat exchanger, so any loss of power (even if not using for some time) will disable its ability to protect from freezing.Tip: If the freeze protection system doesn’t work for some reason, make that there is some water flow from the water heater (minimum will work).It is a good thing that you had protected the outside pipes, but the freeze protection system protects the inner components only.Also I didn’t see anyone recommending some sort of the blanket, such as on the tank-type water heaters, so I would do it here as well.Your Rinnai water heater needs proper venting and correct air supply, so any obstruction might be dangerous.If you are planning to go on a vacation, and if water heater is not going to be used for some time here is what you should do:- Shut off the water and gas supply to the water heater.- Turn the temperature controller OFF.- Disconnect the power to the water heater.- Open the drain plug and drain all the water from water heater.And if any damage occurs on the internal components due to freezing, the warranty is not valid.

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Tankless Water Heater – no hot water

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Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:woohokie1 (VA)This morning I woke up and went to run the hot water for a shower and nothing came out.I tried both downstairs faucets, and when I turn the hot water on I get a very very low flow of cold water.We had snow last night and the temp has been below freezing for the last two days.Could a pipe have frozen?I have a Rinnai tankless heater that runs on natural gas.Any help is greatly appreciated.
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:packy (MA)sure could be frozen.
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:hj (AZ)It is frozen, and the little bit of cold water is coming from one of the faucets which is bypassing the cold water into the hot pipe.
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:woohokie1 (VA)So should I just wait it out?I called a friend of mine who is a plumber but admits to not having much knowledge on tankless heaters and he said it may need to be flushed.I get normal water flow from my cold water pipes. Just FYI
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:hj (AZ)quote; I get normal water flow from my cold water pipesIt has NOTHING to do with the tankless heater, and frozen hot water pipes, which are the normal ones to freeze first, do not stop the cold water from flowing.
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:woohokie1 (VA)So I should just wait it out?It’s supposed to start warming up tomorrow.Thanks so much to everyone for the quick advice!
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:hj (AZ)It would be better to try to thaw it out as soon as possible. The longer it stays frozen, the more likelihood that something will break.
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:woohokie1 (VA)How do I do that?
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:hj (AZ)Open cabinet doors to try to get some warmth into the walls. Other than that we would have to be there to determine WHERE the freezing occurred.
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:Wheelchair (IL)Remember that a frozen pipe (supply) will begin to expand as it is freezing. Warm the pipe where they are cold. Refer to your owner’s manual.Flushing a Tankless, should be done by professionals, to remove any floating barnacles (limescale) before returning it to service.Also, remember if it happens once, it could happen again.Look for ways to prevent this from happening again.Best Wishes
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:hj (AZ)quote;Also, remember if it happens once, it could happen again.Which is exactly why lightning can strike twice in the same place.
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Re: Tankless Water Heater – no hot water
Author:Scott D. Plumber (VA)Sorry for the delay.just saw the post.Got several of these calls with the cold weather. If you are on Propane, chances are your regulator is frozen.In which case you are getting an error code 12.Cll your gas company and have them add methanol to the tank.If you have no water at all, yep, Frozen pipe.Get a heater under the house to thaw things out adn make sure your brick vents are closed.-Give your kids a great start on the future!Encourage them learn a trade.Even if they go on to do other things, it’s always nice to know that they have something to fall back on.Call your local technical training center or trade school to learn more.
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