How To Remove Water Pump Pulley

How to Remove a Water Pump Pulley

Image of an old engine by John Sfondilias taken froma href=’ Fotolia.com /a If the coolant levels are too low, the water pumps will rapidly burn out. Unfortunately, coolant leaks are rather prevalent in older vehicles, and as a result, the water pump is frequently compromised. When the pump wears down, engine failure is a distinct possibility. A new pump is the solution, but replacing it may be a difficult experience if you don’t plan ahead of time. Simply gaining access to the bolts locking the water pump in place, which are frequently covered by the water pump’s pulley, which is in itself difficult to remove, is one of the most challenging phases in the removal of the pump.

Step 1

Remove any obstructions that are in the path of the water pump. A common occurrence is that the alternator and air conditioner compressor belts are in the way. Depress the belt tensioner connected with the belt to be removed, which keeps the belt tensioned at a consistent level, to get enough slack to allow the belt to be easily slipped off. There is a spring that pulls against the belt, and physically moving it the other way can release any tension that has been built up in it.

Step 2

As a result, the timing belt or chain should be removed if necessary, as it is frequently in the path of the water pump. Note the orientation of each sprocket in relation to the others, since it will be important to replace the timing chain in exactly the same manner in order to get the engine to work properly. Each tooth of each sprocket has a notch etched on it; when the timing chain is replaced, be sure that all of the notches are pointed in the same direction as one another.

Step 3

Remove the water pump belt from the water pump and place it somewhere safe. It is possible that this belt may only drive the water pump, or that it will be a serpentine belt that will wrap around the pulleys of many other devices, such as power steering pump and alternator, depending on the vehicle’s unique mechanics, which will be set by the manufacturer. It is not essential to remove the belt from all of the pulleys unless doing so is required in order to reach the water pump.

Step 4

Install the pulley removal tool onto the pulley of the water pump. There are two clips that are positioned below the pulley and a screw that presses against the pump rotor on the end of the tool. The tool will apply pressure to the shaft in order to dislodge the pulley from its mounting on the pump. In order to pry the pulley off using a screwdriver or prying bar, it is necessary to apply pressure to other components of the vehicle’s mechanics, such as the engine, other pumps, and exhaust manifolds, which may result in damage to those sections of the vehicle’s mechanics.

Slowly tighten the removal tool to prevent it from breaking.

Whenever the screw of the removal tool is twisted, it extends toward the shaft of the pump rotor, while the side clips of the tool experience an opposing force that pulls the pulley away from the pump rotor.

When the removal tool is used consistently, it will drive the pulley away from the water pump rotor without shattering or bending the pulley. What You’ll Need to Get Started

  • Adjustable pulley removal tool
  • Socket set / wrenches
  • Screwdriver set
  • Pulley removal tool

Biography of the Author Jesse Randall has a degree in mathematics and physics and currently works as an embedded electronics engineer, where he is responsible for building microcontroller firmware and digital interfaces for various devices. Biogenesis, electrochemistry, and algorithm optimization are some of the topics he covers in his articles. Since 2000, he has been publishing articles on technology-related topics.

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Water pump pulleys are designed to be driven by a drive belt or a serpentine belt to ensure that the pump operates properly. A water pump will not rotate unless it is powered by a pulley, which can be achieved by the use of a timing belt, timing chain, or an electric motor. There are two types of pulleys that are used to drive the water pump on an engine: A v-groove pulley is a single depth pulley that can only drive one belt at a time, as the name implies. Even though certain v-groove pulleys might have more than one groove, each groove must have its own belt in order for the pulley to function properly.

  • It is still possible for the engine to operate even if the alternator belt snaps but not if the water pump belt snaps.
  • In the case of a multi-groove pulley, it is a multi-depth pulley that is only capable of driving a serpentine belt.
  • The serpentine belt system is effective, but when a pulley fails or the belt comes loose, all of the accessories, including the water pump, cease to function.
  • Cracks can also occur on the pulley if the bolts come loose or if the pulley is subjected to an excessive amount of pressure.
  • This will cause the pulley to wobble, which is undesirable.

Part 1 of 4: Preparing to replace the water pump pulley

Having all of the required equipment and supplies on hand before to beginning the task will assist you to complete the project more quickly and effectively. Materials will be required.

  • Allen wrenches
  • Boxed end wrenches
  • Allen key set Breaker bar, flashlight, jack, jack stands, leather gloves for protection, and so forth. Ratchet with sockets in both metric and standard sizes
  • Pulley for the water pump in need of replacement
  • Specific to your vehicle, a serpentine belt removal tool is required. wrench for tightening a screw
  • Torx bit set
  • Wheel chocks
  • Other miscellaneous tools

Step 1: Inspect the pulley of the water pump. To get access to the engine compartment, lift the hood. Visually inspect the water pump pulley for any fractures or misalignment using a flashlight to ensure that it is in proper working order. Step 2: Start the engine and put the pulley through its paces. Check that the pulley is in proper functioning order once the engine has been started. Keep an eye out for any swaying or creaking, and take note if it produces any noises that indicate the bolts are loose.

  • Once you have determined that there is an issue with the water pump pulley, you will need to move the car into position.
  • Check to ensure that the gearbox is in park (for automatic transmissions) or first gear (for manual transmissions) (for manuals).
  • Place wheel chocks around the tires that will be left on the ground to prevent them from rolling away.
  • Engage the parking brake to prevent the rear tires from moving and to keep them locked in position.
  • Lift the car at its stated jacking locations with a floor jack that is appropriate for the weight of your vehicle.

The jacking points for most current automobiles will be located on the pinch weld that runs down the bottom of the car, immediately below the doors. Step 6: Lock the doors and secure the car. You may then lower the car onto the stands by placing jack stands below the jacking points.

Part 2 of 4: Removing the old water pump pulley

Step 1: Identify the location of the water pump pulley. Locate the pulleys that connect the engine to the transmission and the pulley that connects the transmission to the water pump. Measurement 2: Disconnect any components that may be obstructing the drive or serpentine belt from its position. If there are any pieces that are in the way of getting to the drive or serpentine belt, you will need to remove them first. Examples include front-wheel drive automobiles, where certain belts wrap around dogbone engine mounts, which must be removed before the belts can be replaced.

  • To begin, find the tensioner in relation to the belt.
  • If your car is equipped with a v-belt, you may simply release the tensioner to allow the belt to relax.
  • Step 4: Disconnect the clutch fan from the motor.
  • Step 5: Disconnect the water pump’s pulley from the motor.
  • Then you may remove the old water pump pulley that was in the way.
  • To begin, find the tensioner in relation to the belt.
  • If your car is equipped with a v-belt, you may simply release the tensioner to allow the belt to relax.
  • Take note that in order to access the pulley bolts, you may need to travel under the car or through the fender near the wheel, depending on your vehicle.

Step 4: Disconnect the water pump’s pulley from the motor. Removing the mounting nuts that hold the pulley to the water pump is a simple process. Then you may remove the old water pump pulley that was in the way.

Part 3 of 4: Installing the new water pump pulley

Install the new pulley onto the water pump shaft for rear-wheel-drive automobiles. Step 1: Remove the old pulley from the water pump shaft. Pulley mounting bolts should be screwed in place and manually tightened.

Then twist the bolts to the required specs that should have been included with the pulley when it was first installed. If you don’t have any specifications, you can torque the bolts to 20 foot pounds and then turn them an additional 1/8 turn to make up for lost time.

Step 2: Replace the clutch fan or the flex fan with its original location. Install the clutch fan or flex fan back onto the water pump shaft while wearing leather gloves for extra protection. Step 3: Reinstall any belts that were removed from the pulleys. If the belt that was previously removed was a v-belt, you can simply thread the belt through all of the pulleys and then adjust the tensioner to make the belt more or less tight. If the belt that was previously removed was a serpentine belt, you will need to place the belt on all of the pulleys except for one before continuing.

  • Reinstall the appropriate belt in its final position in Step 4.
  • Replace the V-belt tensioner by sliding it over the belt and tightening it.
  • The following steps are required for front-wheel drive vehicles: Step 1: Attach the replacement pulley to the water pump shaft.
  • Then twist the bolts to the required specs that should have been included with the pulley when it was first installed.
  • Take note that in order to access the pulley bolt holes, you may need to travel under the car or under the fender close to where the wheel is to get to them.
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Step 2: Reinstall any belts that were removed from the pulleys. If the belt that was previously removed was a v-belt, you may simply thread the belt through all of the pulleys and then adjust the tensioner to make the belt more or less tight. If the belt that was previously removed was a serpentine belt, you will need to place the belt on all of the pulleys except for one before continuing. Before mounting the belt, locate the simplest pulley that is within reach and place it next to it. Finalize the reinstallation of the suitable belt in the vehicle.

Replace the V-belt tensioner by sliding it over the belt and tightening it.

Part 4 of 4: Lowering the vehicle and testing the repair

Step 1: Organize and clean up your workspace. Gather all of your tools and equipment and store them safely out of the way. Step 2: Take the jack stands out of the way. Then, by using your floor jack, carefully raise the vehicle until its wheels are entirely off of the jack supports at each of the indicated jacking positions. Remove the jack stands from the car and place them somewhere else. Step 3: Lower the car to the ground. Lower the car using the jack to ensure that all four wheels are on the ground when it is lowered.

At this time, you may also remove the wheel chocks from the rear tires and place them in a separate location.

Circumnavigate the block in your automobile.

  • Note: If you use the wrong pulley and it is larger than the original pulley, you will hear a loud chirping noise as the drive belt or serpentine belt pulls on the pulley. If you use the correct pulley and it is smaller than the original pulley, you will not hear a loud chirping noise.

The pulley should be inspected in step 5. When you are through with the test drive, turn on a flashlight and open the hood to inspect the water pump pulley in more detail. Make sure that the pulley is not twisted or damaged before continuing. Also, check to be that the drive belt or serpentine belt has been correctly adjusted before continuing. If your car continues to produce noises after you have changed this item, it is possible that the water pump pulley has to be diagnosed more thoroughly at this point.

The assertions made here are just for the purpose of providing information, and they should be independently checked.

How to remove the water pump pulley?

On January 18, 2007, at 11:57 a.m. Beginning with the TreeThread Starter Date of joining: October 2006 Number of posts: 100Likes received: 0Received: 0 Likeson0 Number of posts: 100 How do I remove the pulley from the water pump? I’m a complete noob here. How do you take the water pump pulley off of an LS1 in a 02? The last time longboard posted was on January 18, 2007 at 12:47 PM. On January 18, 2007, at 6:32 p.m. Launching! Location: California 805iTrader: (10)Joined: July 2005Join Date: July 2005 The number of posts is 275Likes are 0Received 0 Likes are 0 Posts I don’t believe it will come off.

  • On January 18, 2007, at 6:40 p.m., Beginning with the TreeThread Starter Date of joining: October 2006 Number of posts: 100Likes received: 0Received: 0 Likeson0 Number of posts: 100 So, if I want to replace the pulley, I’ll also have to replace the water pump?
  • On January 18, 2007, around 11:40 p.m., TECH Location: Burke, Virginia, United States.
  • Posts: 902Likes: 0Received 0 Likeson0 Posts: 902.
  • It’s the object you can see that’s the furthest up on the pulley, which is the thing you can’t see.
  • It should work like a charm, however I’m not sure if I explained it clearly enough; perhaps someone else can provide a more thorough explanation.
  • On January 19, 2007, at 12:41 a.m.
  • iTrader (Internet Trader): (8) Date of joining: March 2004 The Netherlands is the location of this event.

1 Like on a single post Remove the belt according to birdman’s instructions, and then remove the lid, MAF, beltlow, and plastic component that the lid rests on.

After that, there are six 10mm bolts keeping the water pump in place.

That is the cam swap article, which also contains the removal of the pump from the system.

On January 19, 2007, at 11:04 a.m.

The water pump pulley on my engine has a large circular cover that cannot be removed since it does not have bolts.

At this moment, the engine is not installed in a vehicle.

Do you pry it off with your hands or do you use a pulley puller?

TECHNICAL APPRENTIC (18)Joint Date: February 2006, iTrader Jacksonville, Florida is the location.

370 total posts No likes have been received, and no likes have been given on any of the posts.

Just follow TheBlurLS1’s instructions and use six 10mm bolts and a little prying to get it to come right out.

The following iTraders have joined: (8)Mar 2004, The Netherlands is the location of this event.

What would be the reason for changing the pulley?

On January 19, 2007, at 3:24 p.m.

370 total posts No likes have been received, and no likes have been given on any of the posts.

Is there a specific reason why you only want the pulley itself?

On January 19, 2007, at 4:08 p.m.

I’m putting the finishing touches on the engine, and I’d want to paint the pulleys.

Is it necessary to turn off the water pump?

There are no bolts visible on the pulley that I can see.

I was intrigued by the engine.

On January 19, 2007, at 8:37 p.m., The following are the qualifications for a TECH ApprenticeiTrader: (18)Join Date: February 2006Location: Back in Jacksonville rapin rice!

You could be better off purchasing an electric vehicle; they are more visually appealing and provide a little performance advantage.

on January 20, 2007 Beginning with the TreeThread Starter Date of joining: October 2006 Number of posts: 100Likes received: 0Received: 0 Likeson0 Number of posts: 100 I’m thinking of employing a pulley puller to help me out.

20th of January, 2007 at 1:26 p.m.

Posts: 1,397Likes received: 0 Pulling the pulley off using a puller may be effective, but what strategy do you have in mind for putting the pulley back on?

Pumps with bolt-on pullies were used on 1997-98 LS1s, whereas press-fit pullies were used on all subsequent LS1s.

2:00 p.m.

The number of posts is 370Likes are 0Received 0 Likes are 0 Posts Marc is correct in that you might be able to pull it off, but you’re going to ruin it putting it back on since metal can’t withstand a lot of pressure like that.

On January 20, 2007, at 4:34 p.m.

9,050 total posts If you have a shop press, you can get them off.

I have completed them.

If you use a puller, the pully will be ripped apart.

TECH AddictiTrader (Technology AddictiTrader): (10) Date of joining: May 2005 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is the location.

Is there a gasket on the door on the rear of the water pump that seals it shut?

After that, I was concerned that it might leak out of the rear of the pump when I reassembled the machine.

The original post was made by dirt track racer81. If you have a shop press, you can easily remove them. I have completed them. Remove the five bolts from the back of the pump, and the pump will come out with the help of a press. If you use a puller, the pully will be ripped apart.

How do you remove the pulley on the water pump?

  1. I’m in the process of changing the water pump in my 1978 308. Can you tell me the secret of removing the pulley from the old pump? In an attempt to block the impeller from rotating while using a pry bar and socket on the pulley nut, I’ve tried everything but it won’t budge. Because there was a potential that there was a ruse involved, I didn’t want to push it. Any advice from those of you who have done it previously would be appreciated
  2. I believe I wrapped a leather oil filter strap wrench around the wheel of my car to keep it in place when I did it. The best thing I can recommend is to immerse it in some penetrating fluid. If at all possible, get an impact gun onto it while also finding a means to grab the steering wheel. The difficulty of tightening it up is a similar one, so I purchased an air impact wrench for $29. I used it to tighten the water pump pulley nut and it worked well. As the British say, the pump was “in place” at the time
  3. Thank you for your help, gentlemen. As soon as I realize it will need some serious muscle, I’ll get out the big weapons and get to work
  4. For those without access to an air compressor, you may make do with an electric impact wrench
  5. Are you planning to replace your own water pump, have it rebuilt, or get a new one? When I was working on my water pump, I dialed the number for The Flying Dutchman before attempting to remove the pulley. He advised me not to remove the pulley since they are easily broken and difficult to get
  6. Instead, I should submit the entire system. If you are purchasing a new pump, proceed with caution when removing the pulley. I made the costly error of breaking a crank pulley off of my Toyota truck a long time ago. Cheers
  7. It is not the use of muscle that makes the difference
  8. Rather, it is the fast zap of the impact wrench that causes the nut to spin off. That just cannot be accomplished by hand. And once you’ve removed the nut, the pulley should be able to be wiggled off by hand
  9. If not, a gear puller of proper size should be used. An impact wrench is the best option, and as previously said, it is not the power that is important. It also sounds like it might benefit from the use of penetrating oil. Allow it to marinate for a few minutes before attempting it. Typically, I hold the pulley in place with one hand and then use the impact wrench to tighten it. Because of the brief duration of the impact wrench’s operation, you can generally grasp the component in your hands. I also believe that it reduces the possibility of harming the treads if they become frozen. It would never be installed using an impact wrench in my opinion. The only way to go is with a torque wrench, which I am sure most of you are already aware of
  10. Thank you for making the suggestion. Edwardo
  11. I used an air impact IR wrench to remove mine
  12. If you spend a lot of time working on your car, you should consider investing in air tools. It makes things a whole lot easier.
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Broken Water Pump Pulley – Need Ideas For Removal FIXED

Okay, I’ve gotten it off my chest. To get a pulley, I walked out to the yard and got one – it only took about five minutes, which was a little annoying considering the reason I was pulling it in the first place. In order to get a screwdriver under the bolts that hold the pulley to the water pump, I had to remove the pulley from the water pump. Following the breakage, the pulley slid forward (in the direction of the fan) and effectively blocked the bolts. I could only get to one of them at a time at the most.

  1. I attempted the screwdriver trick, but all I managed to do was bend the screwdriver a little.
  2. About 30 minutes into the journey, I became irritated and decided to remove three of the pulley bolts (I stripped one, yippee!).
  3. They were snapped with a single good crank.
  4. -When I twisted the pulley a specific way, I found that it had a C-shaped notch in it that kept it from turning over the stripped bolt.
  5. I then slapped an old belt on and tightened it with a wrench, then used the alignment tool to hold it in place by use the hole in the alternator bracket.
  6. After a few more rotations, I was able to spin the bastard away.
  7. It appears to have been completely removed.
  8. Thank you for your comments, gentlemen.
  9. In reality, the cooling system as a whole is less than two years old, with every component being new.
  10. Once again, thank you!

removing water pump pulley

Started on : 06-15-2015 04:26 PM
Replies : 6 (379 views)
Last post by : jaskispyder on 06-16-2015 08:29 AM
longjonsilverMemberPosts: 1029 From: Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia Registered: Nov 2001 I am unable to remove the pulley on my water pump on the 84 Duke. I read threads mentioning removing the bolts. My water pump is off the engine and is sitting on the workbench. there are no bolts to remove. Do I use WD 40? Tapping with a rubber mallet? Prying from behind? Or all of the above? Thanks in advance for all your help!- I’m the original owner of a white ‘ 84 2M4 purchased Dec 10, 1983 from Pontiac.Always garaged, no rust, 4-wheel drifts are fun!
PFFSystem Bot
ltlfrariMemberPosts: 5345 From: Wake Forest,NC,USA Registered: Jan 2002 The bolts it is talking about are the 4 that hold the pulley onto the back plate. The back plate itself is a press fit onto the shaftThese 4 (the ones around the edge):If they are out a gentle tap should remove the pulley wheel itself.- Anything I might say is probably worth what you paid for it, so treat it accordingly!Davewww.ltlfrari.com
longjonsilverMemberPosts: 1029 From: Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia Registered: Nov 2001 isn’t that a shot of the v6 water pump? I have the 84duke- I’m the original owner of a white ‘ 84 2M4 purchased Dec 10, 1983 from Pontiac.Always garaged, no rust, 4-wheel drifts are fun!
edfieroMemberPosts: 915 From: Coatesville, PA Registered: Nov 2004 You will need a puller to get it off most likely
ltlfrariMemberPosts: 5345 From: Wake Forest,NC,USA Registered: Jan 2002
quote
Originally posted by longjonsilver:isn’t that a shot of the v6 water pump? I have the 84duke
That’s true but does it have a flange like that and does the pulley have bolt holes in it or is the pulley just pressed on? If no bolt holes then you’ll need a puller I think.- Anything I might say is probably worth what you paid for it, so treat it accordingly!Davewww.ltlfrari.com
longjonsilverMemberPosts: 1029 From: Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia Registered: Nov 2001 thanks guys, i guess i have toget a puller- I’m the original owner of a white ‘ 84 2M4 purchased Dec 10, 1983 from Pontiac.Always garaged, no rust, 4-wheel drifts are fun!
jaskispyderMemberPosts: 21510 From: Northern MI Registered: Jun 2002
quote
Originally posted by longjonsilver:thanks guys, i guess i have toget a puller
Yes, you can borrow a steering pump pulley puller from chain auto parts stores.Or have a shop swap it.

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UN 120 3280 (order ebay until new supplier) -Water Pump Pull

(1) Water Pump Pulley Remover Tool This is a very high quality, MADE IN THE USA, water pump pulley/power steering pulley removal and installation tool.It holds the pulley in place allowing you to loosen and tighten the bolts.Fits all VW/Audi from 1974 – current, power steering and water pump pulleys. This tool’s double, triangular head configuration is designed to be used on pulleys that utilize socket head-bolts.The tool holds the power steering or water pump pulley stationary while removing or replacing the three socket head-bolts that attach the pulley to the shaft.Used on power steering and water pumps on all Volkswagen and Audi water-cooled, four-cylinder, gas or diesel engines, from 1975 to current: Volkswagen V-6 1992 and later.Used on power steering pump pulley with Audi V-8 engines: 1990 to current and Audi V-6 engines, 1992 to current, Audi 1981-1995 and Volkswagen 1983-1988 5 cylinder engines (that have socket head-bolts holding the pulley to the power steering pump.)

Replacing Water Pump: Pulley Bolts Seized

  1. Date of joining:June 25, 2018970 San Francisco is the location. Prius (2006 model year) Model: Four-wheel-drive Touring Hello everyone, can somebody assist me with this? I’m attempting to replace the water pump in my 2006 Prius (which has around 110k miles on it). I’m following the instructions outlined in this YouTube video: as well as this video I’ve reached the point where I need to remove the water pump pulley. The bolts on the pulley, on the other hand, have become stuck and will not budge. However, because the pulley is rotating, I am unable to apply much tension to the bolts, resulting in the bolts not turning at all. Last night and this morning, I applied two rounds of WD40 to the bolts, with the second round being done this morning. They haven’t moved in a long time. Do you have any suggestions on how to remove these bolts? Are there any alternatives to WD-40 for loosening the bolts on the nut? In order to avoid paying $300-400 for labor on this, I’m attempting to delay taking it to a mechanic while I’m so close to doing the task myself. The bolts and the pulley are seen in the attached photo
  2. Insert a big screwdriver into the pulley holes so that it will remain in place while you remove the bolts. It appears to be rather thoroughly lubricated, to the point that you won’t be able to hold it
  3. Hello and welcome to Prius Chat. Here are some questions:
  • Have you driven a lot of miles in your Prius? Have you changed the pump based on the distance, or was there a leak? Is it possible to use a percussive force to loosen the tension on the bolts?
  1. Good luck, and please keep us informed
  2. It appears to be leaking, as seen by the large amount of crusty pink material on it in the photograph
  3. My vision must be failing me since I don’t seem to be able to see the pink crusty mass. It appears to be a lot of PB blaster overspray to me, so it’s difficult to tell
  4. Date of joining:June 25, 2018970 San Francisco is the location. Automobile:2006 Toyota PriusModel:Four-Tier Touring My Prius has around 110k miles on it. This indicates that it has leaked at some point in the past, as seen by the pink residue on its outside. At this time, there is no significant leak. I’m replacing the pump as well as the belt, which is severely broken and will fail shortly. Although I attempted to tighten the bolt by placing a wrench on it and pounding against the wrench, my efforts were in vain. Due to the fact that I’ve been approaching the pulley and bolts from above in order to avoid climbing under the car, there isn’t much area for the tools to maneuver. Without a certain, there isn’t enough space to use an impact wrench. Location:San FranciscoJoined:June 25, 2018970Location: Automobile:2006 Toyota PriusModel:Four-Tier Touring Yes, the pulley is blocking the most of the pink crust in this photograph
  5. But, Date of joining:June 25, 2018970 San Francisco is the location. Automobile:2006 Toyota PriusModel:Four-Tier Touring The majority of the pink crusty mass can be seen behind the pulley in this photograph. The photograph was taken from above, looking down into the engine bay, so that the leakage residue is hidden behind the pulley and out of sight of the camera. I’ve probably applied 7 rounds of WD40 to this point, and it still won’t budge. The next stages are as follows: After much deliberation, I believe I will have to go under the car and remove the engine under covers in order to get to the pulley and bolts from the bottom. To hold the pulley in place while I attempt to turn the bolts, I intend to use a long screwdriver to secure it in place. In some cases, I may have enough space to place a wrench and use a hammer to tap on the wrench. Spraying WD40 on top of a bolt accomplishes nothing other than stinking up the entire area. So you’re completely clueless in this situation. Get some choke cleaner and use it to hose off all of the gunk and clean everything up. Jam a bar in it, as JC suggests, to prevent it from rotating, and then obtain a breaker bar with an extension bar to finish the job. In order to fit over the breaker bars, I use a 3/4-inch piece of emt tubing from Lowe’s that has been chopped to various lengths. It increases the length of the bar and the amount of turning torque you have dramatically. Remove the bolt heads and scrub them until they are sparkling. It will come right off if you use the proper size socket and a high-quality socket rather than a pos harbor freight socket. To get rid of something that is truly stuck on, I put freeze spray on the bolt heads and let it set for a while. Oh, and according to your photoshop, you are rotating the bolts the wrong direction while removing them. It’s been left a little loosey The arrows on your wrench indicate that you are rotating it clockwise. In this case, turning the bolts counterclockwise would tighten them rather than loosen them
  6. For future reference, it would be much preferable to loosen the pulley bolts while the serpentine belt is still in place to assist in braking the pulley rotation. If putting a screwdriver into a pulley hole does not work, another option is to construct a tool by connecting two bolts to a lever and spacing the bolts such that the bolts will fit into two pulley holes
  7. Joined:Jun 25, 2018970
  8. Last modified:Jun 25, 2018970
  9. San Francisco is the location. Prius (2006 model year) Model: Four-wheel-drive Touring Greetings to everyone. As a result, I ended up removing the engine under cover (right hand side), which provided me with access to the water pump pulley from underneath. Then I was able to insert a screwdriver into the pulley holes and hold it in place while I rotated the pulley bolts until they were fully engaged. It wasn’t too difficult to spin the bolts once I had the screwdriver in my hand to provide resistance to the rotation. Replacement of the pump followed a very normal procedure from there on out” (see below). Following the loosening of bolts, the following steps should be followed: replacement and coolant bleeding. removed the three bolts and two nuts that held the water pump in its position – I used an oil pan underneath the car to collect coolant after I separated the pump from the engine. – I removed the old water pump and gasket. – I cleaned the attachment point for the water pump with a scouring pad. – I installed the new gasket and water pump. – I cleaned the attachment point for the water pump. The following tasks were completed: – Torqued down the water pump bolts (8 ft lbs)- Reattached the water pump pulley- Torqued down the pulley bolts (11 ft lbs)- Reattached the idler pulley- Installed a new generator V belt- Tensioned the generator V belt- Torqued down the idler pulley (30 ft lbs) Adding and leaking coolant are two separate tasks. In order to get car running in maintenance mode for approximately 10 minutes, I did the “chicken dance,” which involved opening the radiator cap and turning on the radiator bleed valve. I then filled the radiator with coolant until the bleed valve released any remaining coolant. I then turned off the engine. • The radiator cap and bleed valve have been closed. Then I reattached the bodywork that had been removed in order to have access to the radiator and water pump pulley (engine under cover RH, center engine under cover, front spoiler cover, front bumper cover). My bodywork is fully back together, with the exception of the center engine under cover, which I’ll do tomorrow. I want to attempt to add more coolant tomorrow, test drive the vehicle, allow it to cool, and then attempt to add more coolant again. I believe that is the end of the process. Please let me know if there is anything I missed. PS: I have another question concerning how much to adjust the idler pulley to tension the generator V belt, which I will address later. Given that I don’t have access to a belt tension gauge, I’m going to seek help on how to get the proper tension in that new thread. Date of joining:June 25, 2018970 San Francisco is the location. Prius (2006 model year) Model: Four-wheel-drive Touring This is a good concept. This is something I’ll attempt if I ever have to work on the pump component again
  10. Wow, such a horrible photo, but that old coolant pump was in serious need of replacement. In order to adjust the belt tension, apply 22 pounds of pressure to the middle of the belt between the pulleys using your index finger at the center of the belt. You’re seeking for a secondhand belt with a 0.5″ deflection, and you’ve found one (which the new belt has become after five minutes of use). Check to see that the cabin heater is operational and that there is no bubbling of air in the heater core. You should rev the engine for 10-15 minutes at maximum speed (which is only approximately 3000 RPM) when the car is parked on the driveway and the gear selector is in P, if you find that air has remained in the system. It is necessary to manually activate the CHS relay if you have drained coolant from the CHRS canister drain
  11. Otherwise, you will have to replenish the CHRS canister with coolant. Since you now have access to an impact cannon, it is the most efficient and effective method of disassembling anything. I have a 20-volt electric impact driver as well as a 1/2-drive electric impact driver. Both tools are Dewalt. The 1/2 is a powerful machine that requires only a single push of the button to remove a bolt. Instead of a harbor freight China pos socket, which has a tendency to burst under excessive stress, use an impact socket. It’s more simpler, faster, and less taxing on your knuckles, plus there’s no need for WD40. Just don’t use them to place nuts on bolts since they can cause the bolt head to shatter straight off
  12. Wow, I had no idea what might look like beneath the pulley. That pulley acts like a bandage, concealing the extent of the leak’s severity. Date of joining:June 25, 2018970 San Francisco is the location. Prius (2006 model year) Model: Four-wheel-drive Touring Thank you very much, Patrick. I also went back through the shop manual one more time, and it outlined precisely what I was doing. Once my car has cooled down, I’ll inspect the belt. I checked the radiator this morning before getting into the car and found that it was still nearly full with coolant, almost to the top of the fill tube. We were out running errands when we got a warning that we were driving across town and back again. I also didn’t notice any unusual sounds, such as gurgling, when I was driving. During the bleed yesterday, I believe I was able to remove virtually all of the air from the system

How To Remove Waterpump Pulley From Yaris – Toyota Yaris Manual

1st, disconnect the cable from the negative battery terminal. 2nd, disconnect the cable from the positive battery terminal. 2. DISCONNECT THE ENGINE COOLANT (See page CO-8) 3. REMOVE THE ENGINE UNDER COVER ON THE RH SIDE. 4. DISCONNECT THE FAN AND THE GENERATOR V BELT (See page EM-7) REMOVAL OF THE GENERATOR ASSEMBLY (See page CH-10) REMOVAL OF THE ENGINE MOUNTING INSULATOR SUBASSEMBLY RIGHT HAND (See page LU-17 for further information.) 7. REMOVE THE WATER PUMP PULLEY(a) Hold the water pump pulley in place with SST.

8.

INSPECTION1.

(b) Visually inspect the drain hole for signs of coolant leakage.

Replace the water pump assembly if it is deemed required.

CONSTRUCTION OF WATER PUMPASSEMBLY (a) Install the water pump assembly using three bolts and two nuts to secure it in place through a new gasket.

INSTALL THE WATER PUMP PULLEY(a) Install the water pump pulley with the three bolts in a provisional manner.

SST 09960-10010 SST 09960-10010 SST 09960-10010 SST 09960-10010 (09962-01000, 09963-00700) (c) Tighten the three bolts until they reach the necessary torque.

Installation of the ENGINE MOUNTING INSULATOR SUBASSEMBLY RH (for Hatchback) is the third step (See page LU-26) Installation of the ENGINE MOUNTING INSULATOR SUBASSEMBLY RH (for Sedan) is the fourth step (See page LU-26) 5.

INSTALL THE FAN AND THE V BELT ON THE GENERATOR (See page EM-7) 7.

10.

ADD ENGINE COOLANT TO THE MIXTURE (See page CO-8) 11. INSPECT FOR LEAKAGE OF ENGINE COOLANT (See page CO-1) Installation of the engine under the cover on the right hand side. Continue reading at this link: The temperature at which the Toyota Yaris’s thermostat opens. Was this article of assistance?

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