How To Remove Anode Rod From Water Heater

How to Replace an Anode Rod (6 Steps)

Please keep in mind that this content may contain affiliate links. This means that, at no additional cost to you, we may gain a small profit on purchases made via our links. The anode rod replacement instructions offered here are generalized to work with a broad variety of brands and heater designs, and you may need to change some of the procedures to make them work with your specific model. For example, the anode rod on some General Electric models is concealed under a plastic cap that must be removed in order to gain access to the component in question.

Because it does not sacrifice itself in the same way as a regular anode, it requires no maintenance.

Step 1 – Shut Off the Power and Water

Always switch off the circuit breaker or turn off the thermostat on gas-powered water heaters before doing any work on the unit. If your gas water heater has a “Vacation” option, you may use it to do maintenance on the device without having to relight the pilot afterwards. To turn off the cold water supply line, first check to see whether there is a valve on the line; otherwise, turn off the water at the meter or at the pump.

Step 2 – Locate the Anode Rod

The anode rod will be situated on the unit’s top side, as shown in the illustration. In other instances, it may be directly linked to the hot water outlet pipe located on the top of the heater itself. It is possible that your water heater’s user handbook contains a schematic that illustrates where the anode rod is placed; alternatively, you may visit the manufacturer’s website for further information.

Step 3 – Drain Some Water Out of the Tank

Using a garden hose, connect the drain exit on the bottom of the heater to the outside of the house. Hose should be extended to an outside location or to a plumbing drain that is lower than the tank’s water level. Only around ten percent of the water should be drained from the tank. If you have an anode rod that is positioned on the side of the tank, you will need to empty more. The extra weight in the tank will keep the entire water heater from turning while you attempt to loosen the rod, which is important because many old rods are difficult to remove.

The water will not drain from the tank unless both the drain valve and the hot water valve are opened simultaneously.

Tip: While you’re at it, you might as well totally flush and clean the water heater because half of the job is already done.

Step 4 – Remove the Anode Rod

The anode rod can be removed by using a boxed end wrench or a socket with a square drive. If a wrench is unable to turn the part, a socket and breaker bar should be used.

Small adjustments to the anode rod’s tension will aid in breaking the threads loose, making removal easier. Never use penetrating fluids on water heater components, such as Liquid Wrench, since these fluids have the potential to pollute your hot water supply.

  • Because twisting the water heater might result in leaks or broken pipes, it is recommended that you have a buddy hold the tank while removing and inserting the anode rod
  • It is possible that you may have to cut a pipe in order to replace the anode rod in some cases. Depending on your available space, it may be required to bend the rod in order to get it out. Never knock on the components of a water heater, since the tank liner is readily damaged in this manner. If the anode rod has been corroded with silt and is too big to pull out of the tank, it indicates that the component is still in good working order and should be replaced. In this case, it is necessary to replace the present anode rod.

Step 5 – Install the New Anode Rod

A flexible anode rod may be required if there is insufficient space in your installation. Ensure that the threads on the new anode rod are facing downward and that they are wrapped with plumber’s tape or gently covered with joint compound. Insert the new rod, or the old rod if the old one is not being replaced, into the hole. Turn the component clockwise until it can no longer be twisted by hand, and then tighten it another 1/2 turn with your socket wrench to ensure it is completely secure. Allowing the water heater to spin or twist while doing so is not recommended.

Aluminum vs Magnesium Rods

Anode rods are available in two materials: aluminum and magnesium. Almost many expert plumbers will tell you that a magnesium anode rod is preferable than an aluminum anode rod simply because it creates a greater current than aluminum anodes do. Tank corrosion may be combated more effectively as a result of this improvement in performance. However, the most significant disadvantage of magnesium rods is that it may react with bacteria in the water, resulting in the production of a faint sulfur smell, which is not an issue with aluminum.

A powered anode rod, in my opinion, is the greatest option, although the cost can be significantly more than that of a standard sacrificial anode.

Step 6 – Restore Water and Power

Check to see that the drain is completely closed, and then switch on the cold water supply. Pour hot water into the tank using the same hot water valve you used to drain it, allowing it to flow until all air has been evacuated from the tank. Pitching or hissing sounds will be produced by the faucet as air escapes through the pipe on an irregular basis.

  • Examine for leaks and make any required modifications if necessary
  • Return electricity to the water heater or adjust the gas thermostat to the appropriate water temperature.

Determine whether or not there are leaks and make any required modifications Return electricity to the water heater or adjust the gas thermostat to the appropriate water temperature;

How to Change a Water Heater Anode Rod

This Old Houseplumbing and heating professional Richard Trethewey demonstrates how to replace the anode rod on a water heater in this instructional video. Steps: Water heater should be turned off, as well as the fuel source (gas or electricity). 2 Drain the water heater to a certain extent. Find the anode rod on the water heater and, if required, remove and take it off of its mounting bracket at the top of the water heater. 4 To remove the anode rod from the heater, use a ratchet wrench and a 1 1/16-inch deep socket to unscrew it.

6 Remove and remove the old anode rod from the circuit.

8 If there is insufficient room above the heater to accommodate a normal anode rod, a collapsible anode rod should be used.

Shopping list:

  • Anode rod
  • Steel pipe that is used to offer additional leverage to a ratchet wrench
  • Anode rod and steel pipe Teflon tape
  • A garden hose, which was used to empty the water heater partially

Tools:

Mr.

Fix-It-Up-For-The-Family Replacing the anode rod in a water heater before it breaks may considerably increase the life of the water heater, sometimes even doubling it, by slowing down corrosion inside the tank and increasing the temperature of the water.

Remove the old anode rod

Short bursts from your impact wrench are all that is needed to loosen the hex head. Once it’s free, you may unscrew it by hand.

Photo 2: Install the new water heater anode rod

Pipe dope should be applied to the threads before inserting the new rod into the tank. Tighten with a socket and ratchet by hand to get the desired tension. The majority of water heater tanks are made of steel with a thin layer of glass on the inside to prevent corrosion. Because the lining ultimately fractures, tanks have a second line of defense against rust: a long metal rod known as a “anode rod,” which attracts corrosive substances in the water and draws them into the tank. When the rod itself becomes so corroded that it is no longer able to perform its function, the tank rusts out, leaks, and eventually needs to be replaced.

  • Magnesium, aluminum, and aluminum/zinc alloy are the materials used to make rods.
  • The hexagonal head of the rod is visible on the top of the water heater in the majority of instances.
  • The rod may be hidden behind the sheet metal top of the water heater or it may be linked to the hot water outflow nipple.
  • Drain several litres of water from the tank by opening the drain valve located towards the bottom of the tank.
  • Drain a small amount of water from the tank to inspect for rusted parts.
  • If the water is clear, you can remove the rod and inspect it for damage.
  • If you don’t already have an impact wrench, you can get one up for approximately $30 on Amazon.

Turn off the electricity or gas.

Use the impact wrench to loosen the hex head, but unscrew the rest of the way by hand to complete the job.

Remove it from its hiding place and lift it up and out to inspect it (Photo 1).

If you have fewer than 44 inches of clearance above your heater, a flexible rod should be installed (Photo 2).

Every three years, you should inspect the condition of your anode rod.

Using any sort of wrench will suffice if it protrudes above the surface.

Spray the head with a lubricant such as WD-40 and allow it to soak in for a few minutes to allow it to penetrate.

It is common for the weight of the water in the tank to prevent the entire heater from spinning.

Immediately stop rotating and inspect the area surrounding the hex head for signs of water.

You may need to bend the rod when you remove it from the tank if you do not have enough overhead clearance.

Before you install the replacement rod, apply a thin layer of Teflon pipe thread sealant to the threads of the rod.

It is not recommended to use tape since it might diminish the efficiency of the rod. Drain another gallon from the tank before turning on the water, electricity, or gas to ensure that all debris has been flushed from the system.

Tips for buying an anode rod

Anode rods are intended to attract corrosive elements in the water, so reducing corrosion in the steel liner, which is particularly prone to corrosion.

  • Anode rods made of magnesium are more effective at protecting your tank, but they do not last as long as rods made of aluminum or zinc. Anode rods made of aluminum or zinc are less expensive and are advised if your water smells. However, before making the conversion to an aluminum rod, contact with a water treatment professional.
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Required Tools for this Project

Make a list of all of the equipment you’ll need for this DIY project before you begin; you’ll save both time and frustration this way.

Required Materials for this Project

Preparing all of your stuff ahead of time can save you time and money on last-minute buying visits. Here’s a list of things to do.

How to Remove an Anode From a Hot Water Heater

If the carbon steel liner of a hot water heater is not properly protected, it is susceptible to corrosion. a sacrificial anode is located within the water tank and is made out of less noble metals that will corrode before the tank liner is damaged. Because the anode corrodes readily, it is possible that it will get corroded to the point that it will no longer provide protection to the hot water heater. Anode replacement should be included in routine hot water heater maintenance since it helps to lengthen the life of the holding tank as well as other internal components of the water heater.

  1. Turn off the valve that supplies fuel to a gas hot water heater or the power that supplies electricity to an electric hot water heater to stop the flow of fuel. Immediately turn off the cold water supply to the heater
  2. And Connect the female end of a garden hose to the threaded drain connection, which may be found near the bottom of the tank, to drain the water. Extend the hose to the outdoors. Drain the water by opening the drain valve. Ensure that the holding tank is empty for two to three minutes, or until four inches of water has been emptied from the holding tank. Close the drain valve and remove the hose
  3. Locate the flat-topped, hex-headed anode spud that protrudes from the top of the water heater and remove it
  4. Replace the hose. If the spud is not visible from the top of the tank, use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screws securing the top cap on the holding tank. Splash the threads of the spud with penetrating oil
  5. Attach a 1 1/16-inch socket to the end of a socket wrench and use the socket wrench to turn the anode spud in a counterclockwise direction. Using a breaker bar or a piece of 1-inch tubing over the end of the socket wrench to function as a cheater bar might provide you with greater leverage when loosening the nut. Turn the spud until it lifts from the top of the water heater
  6. If you do not have enough clearance to pull the anode straight out of the top of the water heater, bend the anode in a tiny curve as you draw it from the tank. Lift the anode as far as you possibly can. Pinch the rod with a pair of self-locking pliers so that they are just above the tank. Cover the hole in the tank with a cloth and place the self-locking pliers on top of the rag
  7. Use a hacksaw to cut the rod immediately above the self-locking pliers, just above the hole in the tank Pulling up on the anode is a good idea. Continue to cut until the anode is completely removed from the tank by releasing the pliers and repeating the operation
  8. Wrap thread sealant tape across the threads of a new flexible anode to keep the threads from leaking. Lower the anode into the tank opening until it is flush with the entrance. Using the 1 1/16-inch socket wrench, tighten the anode spud on the anode. To replenish the tank, turn on the water faucet. Activate the gas or electricity to provide power for the heating element

How to Change a Water Heater Anode Rod – PlumbingSupply.com

Many individuals are not aware of how important the anode rod is in protecting the liner of their water heater’s tank, and how much it costs. An “Anode Rod,” which is a long metal rod made of a variety of metals, is found within every water heater. This rod shields the tank from corrosion by corroding first, prior to the tank, and so preventing corrosion. The tank begins to corrode as soon as the anode is depleted. This extremely crucial component of your water heater may need to be updated from time to time in order to keep it from corroding.

  1. Are you unsure about where to begin?
  2. Please keep in mind that there are various different manufacturers of water heaters, each of which may require a separate set of instructions or supplementary information.
  3. Prior to undertaking this procedure, we strongly recommend that you contact the manufacturer of your water heater with any questions you may have.
  4. Items and tools required include:
  • Wrenches with a closed end or a 1-1/16″ socket wrench, as well as a ratchet or breaker bar
  • Pipe wrench (for use exclusively with hot water outlet anode rods)
  • Garden hose of the most basic type
  • Thread sealing tape made of PTFE or high-quality thread sealing compound

Wrenches with a closed end or a 1-1/16″ socket wrench, as well as a ratchet or breaker bar; Pipe wrench (only for hot water exit anode rods); Garden hose of the most basic kind; The use of high-quality thread sealing compound or PTFE thread sealing tape is recommended.

Hot Water Outlet Anodes

It is possible that certain water heaters have what is known as a “Hot Water Output Anode” placed in the outlet side of the water heater. In most cases, they will need to be changed at the same time as the ordinary anode rods in the battery. Due to the fact that they will be linked to the incoming plumbing, the removal and installation procedures will change. The majority of the time, a flexible connection will be made between the hard plumbing and the anode’s nipple. It is sufficient to loosen the nut of the flex line that is attached to the nipple in this scenario.

Occasionally, instead of using a flex line, the hard plumbing may be linked directly to the anode’s nipple in a very specific situation.

After that, the pipe would have to be replaced. If this is the case, we strongly advise that you hire, or at the very least consult with, a professional plumber before attempting to remove these.

Related ItemsInformation

Please keep in mind that the material presented here is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of plumbing-related repairs, troubleshooting, and purchase considerations. This material is intended to be general in nature and may not be applicable to all applications. When in doubt about your ability to accomplish one of these tasks or when you have more concerns about the material offered, seek the advice of a qualified expert immediately. Always double-check local code rules and the appropriate authorities before starting a project of any kind.

3 Types of Water Heater Anode Rod Issues & Steps to Fix

It is common to ignore the many components and sections of a water heater. However, it is critical to be knowledgeable with the components of your water heater in order to be able to respond promptly when issues arise. The anode rod is one of the most vital components of a water heater, and it is one of the most expensive. The purpose of an anode rod has been outlined in order to assist you in diagnosing problems with your water heater. Additionally, we have developed a list of three different sorts of anode rod concerns, as well as the actions you will need to do in order to replace a deteriorating rod.

What Is An Anode Rod and How Does It Work?

An anode rod is a steel wire that is surrounded with a layer of zinc, aluminum, or magnesium to provide corrosion resistance. In most cases, it’s roughly 4 feet in length. It is fastened into the top of a water heater and serves to prevent rust from forming in the water tank. This is accomplished by the use of an electrolysis technique. The anode rod is intended to be immersed in water in order to draw rust and other impurities to the electrode. Because this component draws pollutants in the water, it will help to prevent and slow down the degradation of the inner steel walls of the water storage tank.

Ordinary Problems With Anode RodsTips

Anode rods are expected to last between three and five years, however the length of time they endure is highly dependent on the quality of your water and how much water passes through the water heater. Different factors might contribute to their inability to work properly. Three sorts of difficulties can develop with anode rods, as listed below.

Deterioration

Anode rods are expected to last between three and five years, however the length of time they endure is highly dependent on the quality of your water and how much water passes through your water heater each month. Different factors might contribute to their inability to perform. Three sorts of difficulties can develop with anode rods, as described below.

Soft Water With High Mineral Concentration

Water softener systems add softening chemicals to water, such as phosphates and rock salt, to make it more drinkable. Despite the fact that soft water may be favored by some, it can actually cause the anode rod in the water heater to corrode three times as quickly as hard water.

It can even corrode the steel wire core of the tank, which can result in damage to the tank’s hex head as well as the tank’s internal structure. If the anode rod has shrunk to more than 120% of its original diameter, it is necessary to replace it.

Collection of Calcium Carbonate

A calcium carbonate deposit on the outside of an anode rod in a water heater is not out of the ordinary in this situation. The presence of these white minerals prevents the rod from corroding. While this may be advantageous in other circumstances, the anode rod’s primary function is to corrode in order to keep the water tank safe. You may easily remove the calcium carbonate by wiping it away with a cloth.

How To Replace A Deteriorated Anode Rod

Before you do anything, you must turn off the electricity and water. If you have a gas-powered water heater, you may switch off the circuit breaker or the thermostat to save energy. Using the valve on the cold water supply line, turn off the water to the house. You can also turn off the water supply at the meter itself. Water meters are normally positioned outside your home and have a gray or brown cover on top of them to identify them.

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2.) Locate the Anode Rod

As previously stated, the anode rod for your water heater is located at the top of your water heater. If you are having difficulties locating it, consult the owner’s handbook for your water heater to find out where it is. Alternatively, you may search up the model number of your water heater on the internet and view a schematic of the appliance. Tips and Insights: The Most Telling Signs When Should You Repair or Replace Your Central Air Conditioning System?

3.) Drain the Water From the Hot Water Tank

The water heater’s tank has a drain valve located at the bottom of the tank. Connect a garden shed to this outlet and extend it outdoors or near a drain to make it more functional. Fill the tank with water until it holds roughly 10% of its capacity. Depending on whether your tank’s anode rod is on the side or the bottom, you may need to remove more water. Make sure the drain valve is open, as well as the hot water valve, in order to do this properly. A large number of people choose to drain the entire tank.

4.) Disassemble the Anode Rod

To remove the anode rod from the hot water heater, use a boxed end wrench or a socket with the boxed end. Tightening the anode rod before attempting to release it might aid in breaking it loose and making the removal process more straightforward. Use of penetrating fluids should be avoided since they have the potential to enter your water heater and pollute the water. To determine whether or not your water heater’s anode rod is still in excellent condition, pay close attention to what occurs when you attempt to remove it from the water heater.

If it has entirely rusted away, it will be possible to be removed from the water heater without difficulty.

5.) Purchase and Install the New Rod

Purchase a replacement anode rod from your local hardware shop. Purchasing an aluminum rod rather than a magnesium rod may extend the life of your heater since metal generates a greater current.

If you’re installing the rod by hand, insert it and spin it clockwise until it can’t be twisted any further. After that, using a socket wrench, tighten it even further. Make certain that the water heater does not spin or twist when you are performing this procedure.

6.) Activate the Water Heater

Ensure that the drain valve has been closed and that the cold water supply has been turned on if it has not yet. Pour hot water into the tank using the same hot water valve you used to drain it originally, allowing it to flow until all air has been removed from the tank. As air exits via the faucet, it will generate spitting and hissing noises. Set the thermostat to the appropriate water temperature after re-igniting the power or gas supply.

Water Heater RepairInstallation Services

Virginia residents can rely on Snell HeatingAir Conditioning to offer them with prompt and dependable water heater repair and maintenance services. Additionally, we provide other sorts of emergency plumbing services, such as sump pump installation and gas line repair, if needed. From routine maintenance to installation and replacement, you can rely on our team of plumbers in Alexandria, VA to restore the proper flow of warm water throughout your home or business. Give our experts a call at (703) 543-9649 if you are experiencing water heater difficulties.

How to Inspect and Replace a Sacrificial Anode Rod (Every 3-5 Years)

A rusted anode rod on your water heater tank might eventually cause the tank to explode since there is no sacrificial metal left on the anode rod anymore. Anode rods typically have a lifespan of three to five years, however this is highly dependent on the quality of your water and the amount of water that passes through your water heater during that time. Every three years, you should inspect the condition of your anode rod in order to lessen the likelihood of a leak, enhance the quality of your water, reduce water heater wear and tear, and save a significant amount of money.

How Do Sacrificial Anode Rods Work?

The sacrificial anode rod is the most critical component of a water heater’s design. It absorbs all of the damage so that your tank and pipes don’t have to deal with it. Additionally, a healthy anode rod helps to limit the amount of silt that accumulates at the bottom of your tank, which can cause your energy expenses to rise over time. Sacrificial anode rods are available in three different materials: A more reactive (i.e., least noble) metal is used for the sacrificial rod because water is attracted to steel-lined water tanks and metal pipes in your home.

As long as the anode rods in your water heater tank are examined and changed on a regular basis, your tank will be safe against corrosion.

Top 10 reasons to replace your anode rod

  1. You’d like to extend the life of your water heater as much as possible. It will cost you far less to replace the anode rod than it will to replace your water heater. When the water heater pan starts collecting water, it is considered a problem. Anode rod corrosion can be accelerated by the use of water softeners. Corrosion of anode rods can be hastened by acidic water. When the water heater is heating up, it creates loud or numerous popping noises, which indicates that there is probable corrosion in the tank liner. It’s been three years since you last checked/replaced the anode rod in your vehicle. Aerators on faucets appear to be clogging up more regularly
  2. When you clean the faucet aerator, you notice a slimy gel material on the surface. Water that is gritty, sandy, or has a terrible odour
  3. Water heater expenses that be too high. Old anode rods contribute to the accumulation of dirt at the bottom of the tank, which reduces heat transfer.

How to Replace a Sacrificial Anode Rod

Learn how to replace the anode rod on your water heater in order to keep it from corroding further.

Materials:

  • Drain the water from the bucket or the hose using the appropriate tools. An impact socket with six points and a 1-1/16″ diameter
  • Perhaps a second (or two) pair of hands
  • Replacement anode rod for sacrificial anode

Steps:

Drain the water from the bucket or through the hose; One 1-1/16″ impact socket with six points of high-quality construction. A assistant (or two) could be required. Anode rod for sacrificial replacement

How Do Sacrificial Anode Rods Work?

The sacrificial anode rod is the most critical component of a water heater’s design. It absorbs all of the damage so that your tank and pipes don’t have to deal with it.

Additionally, a healthy anode rod helps to limit the amount of silt that accumulates at the bottom of your tank, which can cause your energy expenses to rise over time. Sacrificial anode rods are available in three different materials:

A more reactive (i.e., least noble) metal is used for the sacrificial rod because water is attracted to steel-lined water tanks and metal pipes in your home. In most cases, the steel water tank will be totally destroyed before the sacrificial anode rod corrodes away completely. As long as the anode rods in your water heater tank are examined and changed on a regular basis, your tank will be safe against corrosion.

Top 10 reasons to replace your anode rod

  1. You’d like to extend the life of your water heater as much as possible. It will cost you far less to replace the anode rod than it will to replace your water heater. When the water heater pan starts collecting water, it is considered a problem. Anode rod corrosion can be accelerated by the use of water softeners. Corrosion of anode rods can be hastened by acidic water. When the water heater is heating up, it creates loud or numerous popping noises, which indicates that there is probable corrosion in the tank liner. It’s been three years since you last checked/replaced the anode rod in your vehicle. Aerators on faucets appear to be clogging up more regularly
  2. When you clean the faucet aerator, you notice a slimy gel material on the surface. Water that is gritty, sandy, or has a terrible odour
  3. Water heater expenses that be too high. Old anode rods contribute to the accumulation of dirt at the bottom of the tank, which reduces heat transfer.

How to Replace a Sacrificial Anode Rod

Learn how to replace the anode rod on your water heater in order to keep it from corroding further.

Materials:

  • Drain the water from the bucket or the hose using the appropriate tools. An impact socket with six points and a 1-1/16″ diameter
  • Perhaps a second (or two) pair of hands
  • Replacement anode rod for sacrificial anode

Steps:

Drain the water from the bucket or through the hose; One 1-1/16″ impact socket with six points of high-quality construction. A assistant (or two) could be required. Anode rod for sacrificial replacement

What is an Anode Rod & What Happens When it Goes Bad?

Something you may not be familiar with is the Anode Rod, which is critical to the longevity of your electric water heater. Unsightly discolored water, a rotten egg stench, air in the pipes, and sporadic hot water are all symptoms of a faulty anode rod. The anode rod in electric water heaters is responsible for protecting the tank. The smell of rotting eggs and the absence of heatstrange noises are indications that it should be replaced. A critical role is played by the anode rod in the operation of electric water heater tank type systems.

What is an Anode Rod

What exactly is an anode rod? Exactly what happens when things goes wrong? The anode is a metal rod that is installed into the interior of the water heater. The rod serves to safeguard the tank’s steel walls by drawing minerals and silt to the tank’s interior. Magnesium or aluminum anode rods are used in the construction of the anode. Magnesium is particularly useful because it has the capacity to give electrons more easily than aluminum anodes, which makes it more efficient. The rod is responsible for removing silt from the tank.

Because it pulls out sediment, the anode rod helps to extend the life of your tank by reducing the amount of time it has to eat away at it.

Anodes and Water Quality

An anode rod is a kind of electrode. How does it manifest itself when it goes wrong. When the anode is installed in the water heater’s inside, it acts as a corrosion resistance. Using minerals and silt as a magnet, the rod shields the tank’s steel walls against corrosion. Either magnesium or aluminum anode rods are used for the cathode. Aluminum anodes are ineffective in comparison to magnesium anodes because magnesium anodes are able to give electrons more easily. In the tank, the rod is responsible for removing sediments.

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As a result, the anode rod helps to prolong the life of your tank by removing silt, which in turn eats away at the anode rod.

Recommendations for Servicing your Water Heater

Air in the lines, a strong “rotten egg” smell, or discoloration in the water are all indications that your water heater needs to be serviced. In addition, you may hear what sounds like air, and the machine may only operate occasionally. Due to the holes that are being generated in the rod as the mineral content eats away at the rod, this occurs. If this occurs, it is a solid sign that your plumber should replace the anode rod with a new one. Additionally, monitoring the pH level of your water will aid in the prevention of anode corrosion.

Regular flushing of your water heater will almost surely extend the life of your equipment as well as its efficiency.

More information on how to maintain your water heater may be found by going here. In addition to serving Red Oak, Maypearl, Cedar Hill, DeSoto, Duncanville, and all of Ellis County, we have been voted best plumber Waxahachie and best plumber Midlothian. Call us right now at 972-937-0040.

How To Replace an Anode Rod

Previous PostNext PostWhen was the last time you had your water heater’s anode serviced or replaced? Are you unfamiliar with the term “water heater anode”? You’ve come to the correct place! The specialists at Aire Serv will teach you all you need to know about water heater anode replacement in the next section of the article.

What Is an Anode Rod?

How long has it been since you changed the anode in your water heater? Previous PostNext Post You’re probably not familiar with the term “water heater anode.” Your search has led you to the correct location! The specialists at Aire Serv will teach you all you need to know about water heater anode replacement in the next section of this article.

How Often Should You Replace a Hot Water Heater Anode?

Water heater anode rod replacement intervals can range from six months to six years in the most extreme conditions, depending on the nature of the water you are using. A water softener or unusually hard water might cause your anode to degrade more quickly than normal. Our recommendation is that homeowners plan on changing their water heater anode every two to four years as a general rule of thumb. When a new homeowner takes ownership of their house, they should enquire as to when the water heater was last professionally serviced.

How to Remove a Water Heater Anode Rod

The replacement of the anode in a water heater can be done by the homeowner. If you want to examine or replace the anode in your water heater, you should follow these steps:

  • In the case of electric water heaters: Turn off the water heater and turn off the electricity to the unit at the main circuit breaker.
  • If you have a gas water heater, turn it into “vacation mode” so that you don’t have to worry about re-igniting the pilot light.
  • Immediately turn off the water supply
  • Drain the water heater with the help of the water heater drain, a short hose, and a bucket for general use
  • Using a socket wrench, remove the anode rod from the top of the water heater tank and set it aside. Remove the anode rod from the tank with care by raising it straight up from the tank. Take care not to hit the anode on the tank or cause it to ring or rattle. This has the potential to break the rod or cause harm to the tank’s inside. Examine the anode rod for damage. Reinstall the rod if it still appears to be in good condition. If it has been extensively corroded, has been decreased in size, or has been somehow damaged, it should be replaced. Install the new water heater anode rod into the tank’s top by screwing it in place. The water supply and electrical connections to the tank should be reconnected.

How to Remove a Stubborn Anode Rod

While it may be tempting to try to loosen a difficult anode rod connection using lubricant or solvent, you should refrain from doing so! Chemicals that penetrate the tank’s walls, like WD-40, can pollute the water and create more serious, long-term problems. An electric impact wrench may be required to remove a recalcitrant water heater anode on your own. You may purchase or rent an impact wrench online. The water heater in your house is a critical, if expensive, component of your home’s infrastructure.

Our professionals are equipped with the tools and knowledge necessary to remove even the most tenacious of anodes from your water heater with ease.

How to Tell If Your Anode Rod Is Bad

Over time, the anode rod in a water heater will rust, exposing the tank’s steel to corrosive conditions. As the anode rod deteriorates, the effectiveness of the device decreases. To establish if it is necessary to replace your water heater’s anode rod, the most reliable method is to remove it according to the instructions provided above. However, there are several symptoms of anode rod degeneration that homeowners should be aware of, including:

  • After some time has passed, the anode rod in a water heater will begin to rust, exposing the steel of the tank to corrosion. A decrease in effectiveness occurs when the anode rod deteriorates over time. To establish if it is necessary to replace your water heater’s anode rod, the most reliable method is to remove it according to the instructions outlined above. Anode rod degradation can be detected in a variety of ways, including the following:

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Removing a Water Heater Anode Rod

Offset Tank for the Year 2009 “data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” data-small-file=” “cimg4021 – Offset Tank – 2009″ is the title of this image. src=” h=228″ alt=” alt=”Offset Tank – 2009″ title=”Offset Tank – 2009″ description=”Offset Tank – 2009″ 320 pixels wide by 228 pixels high srcset=” h=228 320w, h=456 638w” srcset=” h=228 320w, h=456 638w” sizes=”(max-width: 320px) 100vw, 320px”> sizes=”(max-width: 320px) 100vw, 320px”> Tank with offset – 2009 I removed the anode rod from the water heater tank while it was being drained.

The anode rod is essentially a cylinder of aluminum around a steel-wire core that is linked to a steel bolt that screws into the top of the water heater to provide corrosion protection.

One issue is immediately apparent: the anode rod’s head is slightly skewed in its aperture above the water heater, making it nearly hard to insert a standard 1-1/16′′ socket into the device.

Take note of the fact that the cold water input nipple is offset when the faucet is first opened.

What is the reason behind this?

When Whirlpool’s engineers were entrusted with increasing the amount of insulation in the shell in order to get a higher efficiency rating, it appears that they forgot that T P valves do not have arbitrarily long stem lengths.

The insulation is noticeably thinner on one side than it is on the other, the anode rod cannot be removed and the inlet/outlet nipples scrape against the top cover; nonetheless, these are minor inconveniences in the grand scheme of things.

(the one that recently failed).

“Made with pride in the United States of America,” as they say.

In 2004, after two years, I saw that the rod was corroding, but that is just as it should be: it is still in operation!

Despite the fact that the suggested examination period is three years, I admit to having let it slip for five years because of what I had seen before.

Eventually, I screwed in an 18-inch breaker bar and wailed on the end with a two-pound hammer until the bolt head loosened and the whole thing unscrewed effortlessly and came out without any additional resistance.

A six-point impact socket will be arriving shortly ($0.99 from eBay plus $2 postage), so I’ll be able to replace the 12-point socket I used for this procedure.

Being someone who has been there and done that, you would think I would have learned from my mistakes, but I needed to get that item out in order to continue with the sediment extraction.

I looked around and saw no one else.

I remove my eyes from the tank and look about.

After further investigation, it was discovered that the rod had been snapped off quite some time previously.

Two rod cores are folded against each other to form the long piece to the right, which ends in a tidy U-bend at the far right end.

the image src=”h=102″ alt=”Corroded anode rod core” src=” h=102″ srcset=”750w,h=102 743w,h=44 320w” srcset=”750w,h=102 743w,h=44 320w” sizes=”(max-width: 750px) 100vw, 750px”> sizes=”(max-width: 750px) 100vw, 750px”> The anode rod core has corroded.

but.

Leaving the rod over the heating element appears to be a bad idea, and I should also remove the remainder of the silt from the bottom of the tank.

I spent $28 at JD Johnson, a local plumbing supply store, on a new magnesium rod for my plumbing project.

The rod is 36 inches in length, which is half a foot less than the original 42 inch rod, but it’s near enough; given the limited headroom, it’s simpler to get into the tank with this length.

The bottom heating element must be removed with the use of a 1-1/2′′ socket and the bravery to cut back the insulation that has been packed into the element port. More on it in the coming days.

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