How To Install Water Heater Expansion Tank

7 Easy Steps to Install Water Heater Expansion Tank

You should install a water expansion tank in your building now that you have determined the proper size for your system’s water expansion tank. Fortunately, no specific talents are required for this procedure. To execute this activity, you will just require this tutorial and a few simple tools. You will need to purchase the tank first, though, which will require you to go to a store. A small device may be purchased for as little as $40, but bigger units might cost several hundred dollars. If you want to use the item in conjunction with a 40- to 50-gallon heater, select a 2-gallon type.

You will need to install a tee fitting above your water heater in order to get a proper fit.

How to Install Water Heater Expansion Tank

Your water heater’s water supply should be turned off. If your unit is permanently connected to a water supply line that has a shut-off valve, turn off the water flow from the supply line to your building. If your devices are powered by electricity, turn off the circuit breaker. If your water heater is powered by gas, turn off the gas supply. However, if you are unsure about how to complete this procedure, you should contact your local gas supplier for assistance.

Step 2: Bring Out Expansion Tank and Accessories

Seek for an expansion tank that will be a good fit for your unit. This may be accomplished by taking note of the heater’s dimensions before purchasing the tank. As soon as you go to the hardware shop, you may double-check the dimensions. Don’t forget to get up some plumber’s tape as well as the tee fitting. A set of screws (1 and a half inch long) and mounting brackets should also be included.

Step 3: Confirm the Water Supply Line for Cold Water

Locate the cold water line that is horizontal to the water heater by going to the cold water line and looking for it. This line will be required in order to establish a connection with the unit.

Step 4: Install the Expansion Tank

To put the unit near to the heater, it should be placed above the pipe that feeds cool water to the unit. Mark a location on the wall where the mounting pipes will be installed and drill few holes in the wall. Attach the cold water supply line to the expansion tank and screw it in place.

Step 5: Attach the Heater Tank

Make your way to the bottom of the connection on the expansion tank and cover the area with plumber’s tape before attaching the connector to the tee fitting at the top. A wrench should be used to tighten this connection. Make sure it’s not too tight.

Step 6: Restore the Water and Power Supply to the Heater

Navigate to the bottom of the connector on the expansion tank and wrap the area with plumber’s tape before attaching the connector to the T-fi tte. With a wrench, tighten the connection. Maintain a comfortable fit.

Step 7: Check the Expansion Tank

By turning on the faucet, you may check the tank’s level. After that, place your palm under the faucet to check if the water is hot or cold.

How Do I Know If The Expansion Tank Is Working?

Assume that a diaphragm separates the water from the air in the expansion tank. If it is installed at the end of the water supply pipe that distributes cold water, it will function properly. Gently tap the top and bottom of the expansion tank with your fists. If the tank has a hollow sound, that means it is in great working order. If, on the other hand, you hear a thud, this indicates that water has entered the upper chamber as a result of a damaged diaphragm. Check the temperature of the tank by touching the upper and bottom portions of it.

Because it keeps cold air in the top area, you should get a sense of coldness there. The TPR valve will drop water if the water heater tank has high pressure while functioning with a faulty expansion tank because of the high pressure.

Common Questions about Installing Water Heater Expansion Tank

Assume that the diaphragm in the expansion tank separates water from air. If it is installed at the end of the water supply pipe that distributes cold water, it will work well. The top and bottom sections of the expansion tank should be gently smacked. Unless the tank makes a hollow sound, it is in fine working order. In the event of a loud thud, however, this indicates that water has entered the upper chamber as a result of a broken diaphragm and is accumulating there. Check the temperature of the tank by touching the upper and bottom portions of the tank.

Due to the fact that it keeps cold air in the top area, you should have a feeling of coolness.

2. Should I Place My Expansion Tank Near the

It is necessary to repair an expansion tank that is located near a water heater. This device may be installed anywhere along the water supply line. The majority of the time, it remains attached with a T at the cold water input that provides the water heater with cold water. You can, however, place it on a portion of the cold water supply line if necessary.

3. What is the Perfect Angle for My Expansion Tank?

It is possible to install an expansion tank at any angle you choose. Some manufacturers, on the other hand, advised that you hang it in a vertical orientation. However, any other upright angle is acceptable. Make a hole in the pipe and fasten the clamps with screws. So that it lines up with the tank’s screw holes, it is aligned. However, because it only allows you to set it in a single location, this approach might be annoying. When you acquire an expansion tank, it comes with a saddle fitting installed.

It is designed to fit the pipe while also include features that allow it to be connected to the expansion tank.

How to Install a Water Heater Expansion Tank

Despite the fact that expansion tanks are not necessary in many regions of the nation, they are one of the most beneficial water heater additions. Regardless, many homeowners and landlords choose to install this safety device in conjunction with their water heaters as a precaution. Although this isn’t the most difficult DIY project, it is a difficult one. It’s simplest to install the expansion tank at the same time as the water heater, but that isn’t always a possibility in every situation. In order to go into depth about how to install a water heater expansion tank, let’s start with the most fundamental question: what is a water heater?

What Is a Water Heater Expansion Tank?

As a result of the operation of water heaters, thermal expansion occurs. It used to be that water heaters would discharge their waste into the public water supply. Cities now utilize a check valve to prevent this reverse discharge of water due to worries about pollution in the water supply. Installing an expansion tank on the supply pipe of a water heater might provide homeowners with relief from high pressure in their water heaters. It is the expanding water that is drawn into the expansion tank that causes it to expand thermally.

High pressure may cause damage to your plumbing in a variety of ways, which is why expansion tanks are so important to have. And if you require an expansion tank, this 2-gallon Watts PLT-5 is a good option.

Installing an Expansion Tank

The expansion tank can be installed on either the hot or cold side of the boiler. In this case, there is some disagreement, and your local code may demand one or the other, so verify with your building department. Having a few of pipe wrenches or open-jaw/Channellock pliers on hand can come in in while tightening or loosening the fittings. You want them to be as safe as possible. We recommend that you use galvanized* fittings since they are inexpensive, simple to install, and will perform well in this application.

Preparation

If you already have a water heater and you’re putting an expansion tank on top of it, you’ll need to empty the old water heater before proceeding. Be sure that there is adequate room above your water heater where the expansion tank can be installed before you begin your project. Unless this is a fresh building project, there is no need to drain anything, and you can go to the following section:

  1. If you already have a water heater and you’re putting an expansion tank on top of it, you’ll need to drain the old water heater before you can proceed. Be sure that there is adequate room above your water heater where the expansion tank can be installed before you begin your installation process. It is not necessary to drain anything if the building is brand new, and you can go to the following section:

Water Heater Expansion Tank Installation in 7 Steps:

  1. Removing the copper flex line from the nipple at the top of the water heater on the cold/inlet side will save you time and effort. With your hand, you can feel both the cold and the hot
  2. The warm one corresponds to the exit. Install a tee in the location where the flex line was previously attached. It is important to remember to apply plumber’s tape and/or pipe joint compound (liquid Teflon) on the water heater nipple that you will be attaching. This will improve the integrity of the connection and prevent leaks from occurring. tighten it till one of the outlets is pointing up and the other is facing in the direction in which you wish to place the tank. Once the expansion tank is attached, you can typically move it a little bit, but you can never turn it back (counter-clockwise). A loose connection, on the other hand, will increase the likelihood of leakage
  3. Otherwise, you will set yourself up for failure. Plumber’s tape should be applied to both ends of the long nipple (about 12″ in length)
  4. Thread the opposite end of the nipple through the side of the tee after tightening an elbow on one side of the nipple. Adjust the nipple and elbow by hand, and then use the pipe wrench/pliers to complete the job of fastening the joints. It is preferable to have the elbow facing up when you have them totally tightened. Put plumber’s tape or pipe joint compound over the threads of a short nipple (about 2″) at the top of the tee to keep it from falling apart during installation. As previously stated in step 1, this will connect to the water heater flex line that you removed earlier. Tighten the nipple by hand, and then use the pipe wrench/pliers to complete the process of securing the connection. The water supply line should be reconnected to the short nipple and tightened with the pipe wrench/pliers. There’s a strong possibility you’ll be working in a confined place, and if you do, you can install a longer flex line and loop it around itself to make things easier. You can alternatively divert it away from the expansion tank (while being cautious not to kink it) without jeopardizing the installation
  5. However, this is not recommended. In step 4, wrap a piece of plumber’s tape or pipe joint compound around the expansion tank’s threads, and then screw the expansion tank into the elbow that you previously placed. It makes little difference which way the tank eventually faces
  6. What matters is that it ensures that the connection is as tight as possible.

*Whenever galvanized and copper or galvanized and brass come into contact, the use of dielectric unions/fittings is mandatory. If you have a limited amount of space, stainless steel fittings are preferable than galvanized fittings since stainless steel and copper/brass do not have the same problems as galvanized fittings.

The Plumbing and Water Heater Experts

Now that you’ve learned how to install a water heater expansion tank, be sure to take advantage of the discounts available on all water heater components at PlumbersStock. We have Bradford White as well as other excellent brands. Please get in touch with us if you have any queries regarding your project or about water heaters in general. Resources that are related to this topic include: Installing a Gas Water Heater: A Step-by-Step Guide Installing an Electric Water Heater – Step by Step Instructions Soldering Water Heater Pipes – Step by Step Instructions How to Wire a Hot Water Heater (with Pictures)

How to Install Hot Water Heater Expansion Tank

In the case of hot water, it expands when heated, and because it is not compressible, the pressure in the pipes increases if there isn’t any more space. In order to deal with the thermal expansion of water, you must connect the extension tank to the water supply line in order to avoid excessive water pressure from building up. The consequence of excessive pressure in the conduit pipes is serious damage to couplings, fittings, and valves, as well as the water heater, and the expansion tank serves as a safety precaution.

It is possible to install on either the hot or cold water pipes; however, the location of the water heater is not important.

What You Need

The following components will be required in order to complete a successful expansion tank installation. Tank for the expansion of a water heater Pipe wrenches are a type of wrench that is used to hold pipes together.

Hacksaw Drill a pipe threader that is operated by hand Teflon tape is a type of tape that repels water. Pipe joint compound is a type of compound that is used to link pipes together. Screws tee-shirt fitting

Install Your Expansion Tank

The size of your water heater’s expansion tank will be determined by the capacity of your water heater. If you know how much water your water heater can hold, the attendant at your local hardware shop can assist you in acquiring the tank you require. While you’re in the store, you may pick up the tools mentioned previously. Reduce the amount of water that is supplied to your water furnace. Stop water flow at the primary supply line to the house; if your water supply line is equipped with a shut off valve, turn it off there as well.

  1. Determine the location of the horizontal cold water pipe and the location of the expansion tank on the supply pipe.
  2. Prepare threads on the two ends of the inlet pipe by cutting it and threading it.
  3. To complete the connection, insert tee fittings into both ends of the expansion tank.
  4. Check that the connection between the tee fitting and the expansion tank is sufficiently tight.
  5. In order to ensure that you have properly placed the water line, make sure that you turn on the water faucets.
See also:  How To Adjust Water Heater Temperature

How to Install an Expansion Tank in Your Plumbing

Tom Lohr is a dedicated home renovation enthusiast who enjoys working on his own projects. Rather of saving money, he likes to use it to purchase new equipment and gardening materials. This is an example of a standard expansion tank. Tom Lohr is a professional photographer.

Prevent Over-Pressurization

Keep the burden off of yourself and your plumbing systems. Excessive water pressure can cause plumbing to become overworked, resulting in costly and harmful leaks. One would assume that the water pressure in your home’s plumbing system would be continuous, but this is not the case. You must have an expansion tank connected to your water supply piping in order to maintain the pressure consistent and prevent over-pressurization. The pressure varies. The optimal water pressure for a residence is around 60 PSI.

  • When I initially examined the pressure in my city-supplied system when I purchased a vacant house, it was 125 pounds per square inch.
  • The water was still running when I switched it back on, and one of the PEX fittings was spouting water.
  • There isn’t much you can do about the water pressure that is delivered to your home or business.
  • Furthermore, if your pressure is high, you should definitely consider installing one.
  • They are very simple to put together, making it an excellent do-it-yourself project.
  • Simply connect it to the water supply and check the pressure.
  • If you do decide to install a pressure regulator, it would be a good idea to do so at the same time that you install a pressure gauge in your water supply line, which should be installed in line with your plumbing immediately after the pressure regulator.

Pressure gauges for PEX systems are rather affordable, and they will keep you informed about the water pressure in your plumbing system.

This is due to the fact that water expands as it warms in your hot water tank.

This was never an issue in the past.

Your home’s plumbing system was completely isolated from the city’s plumbing system, and that valve was the only item that separated the two.

Someone had the bright notion that it was possibly harmful for your home’s water to back up into the city’s water supply system.

If your pipes were tainted, the contamination might spread throughout the city and contaminate others.

Backflow preventers, which are tiny check valves that only allow water to flow in one direction, were required to be installed in residences as a result of this judgment.

The difficulty is that these backflow preventers also prevent the extra pressure in your system from being released by expanding into the city’s system, which would otherwise occur.

The answer is to incorporate an expansion tank. Installing a water pressure gauge is simple thanks to the use of PEX push connectors. Tom Lohr is a professional photographer.

Expansion Tanks Demystified

You’ve undoubtedly come across an expansion tank while working on a plumbing project. Essentially, it is a basic, compact tank that is often located slightly above the water heater and is connected to the main system through a branch pipe. If you don’t already have one, you should get one. It is simple to install, and the total cost for everything is just $70. Showering and using 10 gallons of hot water in a normal 40-gallon hot water heater tank means that you will need to replace 25% of the heater’s capacity.

  • When cold water is heated, it creates a challenge for the system.
  • Because of the backflow preventer, the excess volume has nowhere to go and is exerting a significant amount of pressure on your plumbing system.
  • An expansion tank is a small tank that is divided into two chambers on the inside by a divider.
  • One side of the expansion tank is linked to the cold water supply to your water heater, while the other side is not attached.
  • There is a little valve on the end of the tank, similar to the one that is found on a bicycle tire, that allows you to pump the chamber to the exact pressure that you require in your system.
  • A branch line connects your water heater’s expansion tank to your cold water heater’s expansion tank when the cold water being heated by your water heater expands.
  • When the pressure in your home surpasses the pressure in the air chamber side of the expansion tank, the water pressure on the other side of the tank bends the rubber wall, providing additional space for your system.
  • Installing an expansion tank is a worthwhile investment of your time and money due to the peace of mind it brings you.

1. Make a Plan

You should have a strategy in place for how you are going to run a branch line from your hot water tank’s cold water supply to the expansion tank at this time. Create a schematic and gather the fittings you’ll need to connect a line from the expansion tank to a tee-fitting that will be inserted into your cold water supply line, as shown in the illustration. The shirt fitting and the fitting for the end of the tank may be all that is required, if you are fortunate.

Typically, one or more elbow fittings are used in conjunction with the pipe. Less is more in this case. Believe me when I say that this setup makes sense. Tom Lohr is a professional photographer.

2. Choose Your Spot

It will be much easier to do this job if you already have PEX lines in your home. With copper lines, the process is a little more difficult but not insurmountably difficult. It is necessary to first choose the location where your expansion tank will be housed and mounted. It should be installed as near to the water heater as feasible, and at least 18 inches above the water heater itself. Possibly, you’ve seen some that were attached to a copper pipe that was sticking straight up in the air. This method is effective, but it is not encouraged.

Get a universal expansion tank mount instead of going through the bother of modifying your vehicle.

3. Acquire the Necessary Hardware

Additional supplies, such as fittings to connect your tank to the appropriate size water pipes in your home, teflon tape to ensure a secure connection, and at least a few fittings will be required in addition to your tank and bracket. Using PEX push-to-connect fittings will be demonstrated in depth. If you have copper pipes, you can do one of two things: either purchase all copper fittings and learn to braze them on (which is not a difficult skill to acquire), or purchase PEX push to fit fittings, which will connect to both copper and PEX pipes.

If you have galvanized steel pipes, you should carefully consider replacing them.

4. Prepare Tank and Mount Bracket

Make the work simpler by connecting the connection fitting to the end of the tank first, then wrapping teflon tape across the threads of the connection fitting. In order to connect to your tank, you’ll need a fitting with a 3/4 female on one side and your desired size of PEX or copper pipe on the other; often 12 inch. Install the bracket for the expansion tank. Before you can attach the tank, you must first mount the tank. Note: Make sure that the air valve on the other end of the water connection is easily accessible and that there is enough space to accommodate a bicycle pump.

If your water pressure is greater or lower than 50 PSI, pump up the tank or release pressure to get the pressure to the same level as your system.

Before attaching the tank, check the pressure and make any necessary adjustments.

It is functional, but a specialized bracket is more attractive and performs better.

5. Water Supply and Tank

Turn off the water supply to your residence.

Open the faucets at the bottom of the water line to allow the pressure and water to drain out of the water pipes. Turn off the water heater in your home. Attach the expansion tank to the tank bracket using screws.

6. Add a Tee-Fitting

Place or hold a cloth precisely below the point at which you will be inserting a tee-fitting into the cold water supply line of your hot water heater. There will be some leftover water in the pipes, and it will seep out eventually. Cut the supply line at the place where you wish to install the tee-fitting to prevent it from bursting. Make use of the tee-fitting to determine how much of the line you will need to take away to make the tee fit. It won’t amount to much. Depending on how your PEX is laid out, you may be able to bend it sufficiently so that you do not need to take off a portion at all, but only a cut in the line instead.

Make a note of the direction the line between the tee-fitting and the expansion tank will be running in.

Push, crimp, or one of the other two connections on the tee-fitting will suffice.

It was necessary to use an elbow fitting to finish the connection.

7. Connect Tank to Tee

Inserting a tee-fitting into the cold water supply line of your hot water tank requires you to place or hold a towel right below the fitting. The lines will leak because there will be some leftover water in them. The supply line should be cut at the point where you wish to place the tee-connector. To determine how much line you will need to cut off in order to suit the tee, use the tee-fitting as a guide. Not much will be gained from this arrangement. The way your PEX is laid out may make it possible to bend it sufficiently so that you do not need to take off a portion at all, but rather only a cut in the line.

Note which way the line between the tee-fitting and the expansion tank will be running when finished.

Tighten the tee-fitting by pushing, crimping, or using one of the other two connections.

To finish the connection, an elbow fitting was required.

8. Do a Quality Control Test

Following the completion of your connections and the establishment of a full line between the tank and the cold water supply, it is time to conduct a leak detection test. Ensure that the faucets that you opened to drain away pressure and water are still operational. Taking it slow, slowly open the valve that connects your home to the city’s water distribution system. If you see that a constant stream of water is flowing out of the faucets, turn them all off immediately. Check for leaks in all of the fittings that you previously placed.

The leaky one will require additional pressing in order to get a better connection, or crimping if you are using that sort of PEX fitting, or brazing if you are using copper pipe. When you are confident that the connection has been repaired, repeat the turn-on procedure.

9. Restart the Hot Water

You should now be able to test for leaks after connecting all of your fittings and running a complete line between your tank and your cold water supply. Ensure that the faucets that you opened to drain away pressure and water are still open. Taking it slow, slowly open the valve that connects your home to the city’s water system. The faucets should be turned off as soon as a continuous stream of water is pouring out of them. Check for leaks in all of the fittings that you just placed. Turn off the water supply to your home, drain the pressure and water from the pipes again using the same faucets, and double-check the new fitting connections to see if any are leaking.

Re-run the turn-on procedure once again if you believe you have resolved the connection issue.

Pressure Matters

This is a simple Do It Yourself project. The bracket and tank installation will be the most difficult part of the project. It seems like there is never enough space to make things simple. If you have, or if you were smart enough to install, a pressure gauge, make sure the pressure in the expansion tank matches the pressure you set in the expansion tank before. Expansion tanks are rarely given the attention they deserve. As a result of the changing pressure in your water pipes, fittings will get loose and you may ultimately have a leak.

  1. Even if you don’t have a plan for this weekend, you now know what to do next weekend.
  2. Content is provided solely for informative and entertainment reasons and should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal counsel or professional guidance in commercial, financial, legal, or technical problems, unless otherwise specified.
  3. Your posts are chock-full of excellent suggestions for individuals who like to handle things themselves.
  4. It has certainly piqued my interest, and I’m considering testing my water pressure.
  5. Excellently described.
See also:  How Long Does It Take To Install A 40 Gallon Hot Water Heater?

How to Install a Thermal Expansion Tank – Installation Tips

The following is a step-by-step explanation on how to install a thermal expansion tank in a water heating system at your house. What is it, how does it operate, and why is it vital to have one installed?

What is an expansion tank and how does it work?

Expansion tank (also known as an expansion tank) A thermal expansion tank, also known as an expansion vessel, is a device that is used in potable water and hydronic space heating systems to protect the system from being overloaded with water pressure. It is the purpose of expansion tanks to accept an increase in the amount of hot water, to lower the pressure, and to safeguard the system from failure. These devices comprise an air membrane (diaphragm), which is typically made of rubber and is pressured with air on one side while being filled with water from the home’s plumbing on the other.

As the temperature and pressure of the water begin to fall, the diaphragm returns to its original position, allowing the cooled water to be returned to the heater.

Note: When water is heated from 50 degrees Fahrenheit to 120 degrees Fahrenheit, the volume of the water rises by roughly 2 percent. The expansion tank must be of sufficient size, and the installed capacity is determined by the size of the water heater.

Why it is essential to install an expansion tank

In situations when the expansion tank is not fitted and pressure begins to build up, water pouring from the temperature and pressure relief valve is one of the most prevalent problems that arise (TPR valve). Because of the increased pressure, the expansion might interfere with the normal operation of the valve, resulting in energy waste, shorter unit life, and the creation of a possible safety issue. Due to the fact that water is regarded to be non-compressible, the extremely high water pressure causes far more serious complications.

How to install a thermal expansion tank – Instructions

  • Check the water pressure in your house to make sure it is enough. It should be in the vicinity of 50 PSI. Install the pressure reduction valve if the pressure is greater than 80 PSI. Verify that the pressure of the air within the thermal expansion tank is enough. Your home’s maximum water pressure should be used to determine the appropriate pressure. If necessary, use the hand pump to boost the air pressure in the room. It is advised that a thermal expansion tank be installed on the cold water line, horizontally, and in close proximity to the water heater. To construct a watertight connection, use a threaded T-fitting, Teflon tape, and a pipe wrench together. By turning on the hot water faucet, you may release the trapped air.
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How to check if the expansion tank working

We will suppose that the diaphragm in the expansion tank is used to separate the water from the air in the tank. It is connected to the cold water supply line on the cold side of the water supply line. Tap on the tank’s upper and bottom halves at the same time. When you tap on the upper half of the structure, it should produce a hollow sound. In the event that you hear a thud sound, this indicates that the top chamber is filled with water, which indicates that the diaphragm has been destroyed.

Ice cold at the faucet, where the air is placed, and warm at the bottom, where the warm water from the tank is held, are the ideal temperatures.

The reading should be in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

Sizing tips and calculators

Was it ever brought to your attention that you may utilize an internet calculator to determine the size of an expansion tank? One may be found on the westank.com website; however, you must give details such as:

  • The volume (capacity) of the water heater
  • Water that is too cold to drink
  • The maximum temperature of the outgoing water or the highest temperature of the water
  • The initial pressure exerted by the influx of water
  • Final pressure is the highest level intended

The majority of expansion tanks designed for domestic usage have a capacity of between 2 and 5 gallons of water. It is preferable to install a bigger expansion tank if you are unsure about the size of the tank. Excess pressure will force the relief valve to open if you install a smaller expansion tank than is necessary.

Conclusion

A DIY house project that can be completed in a short amount of time by any handyman is the installation of an expansion tank. Purchase of expansion containers is not prohibitively expensive; they typically range between $20 and $100. Aside from that, you will want copper pipes and soldering material, or galvanized pipe and fittings, for the installation. Whatever type of water supply system your home has, whether closed or open, you should install it since it will protect the system not only from thermal expansion and high pressure, but also from irreversible damage to the heater and heating system.

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How to Replace Your Water Heater Expansion Tank

You may save a significant amount of money and time by replacing your water heater expansion tank on your own.

This tutorial will walk you through the process of replacing the expansion tank on your hot water heater without the need to hire a professional plumber. Simply follow the instructions outlined below to replace your water heater expansion tank in a safe manner.

Step 1 – Identify Your Old Expansion Tank

The first step in replacing the water heater expansion tank is to identify where it is located on the water heater. Most of the time, the tank is positioned immediately next to your water heater and is directly linked to the water heater. Once the problem has been detected, make a note of the dimensions and connections to guarantee that when you purchase a replacement, it will fit and function properly. New water heater expansion tanks can be purchased at a local hardware supply store or ordered on the internet.

Step 2 – Turn Everything Off

The first step in replacing the water heater expansion tank is to identify where it is located on the water heater. Most of the time, the tank is positioned immediately next to your water heater and is directly linked to the water heater. Once the problem has been detected, make a note of the dimensions and connections to guarantee that when you purchase a replacement, it will fit and function properly. New water heater expansion tanks can be purchased at a local hardware supply store or ordered on the internet.

Step 3 – Drain the Water

Drain the water from the water heater to lessen the pressure of the water coming out. By opening the bleeder valve, you will be able to drain the water. Fill the bucket with water and set it aside. Because the water may be pressured, use caution when using it.

Step 4 – Disconnect the Expansion Tank

Carefully disconnect the expansion tank from the rest of the system, taking care not to damage any of the pipes or fittings in the process of doing so.

Step 5 – Pressurize the Expansion Tank

Check the pressure reading in the tank while the water supply is turned off. It should read “0.” To fill the tank, use a bicycle tire pump and attach it to the Schrader valve, which is located at the bottom of the tank. Air should be added to the tank until it reaches 12 psi, or according to the amount specified on the manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 6 – Check the Pressure

Check the pressure reading in the tank while the water supply is turned off. It should read “0.” To fill the tank, use a bicycle tire pump and attach it to the Schrader valve, which is located at the bottom of the tank. Air should be added to the tank until it reaches 12 psi, or according to the amount specified on the manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 7 – Teflon Tape

Make use of the Teflon tape and wrap it around the ends of the connections to secure them. Do not start wrapping the Teflon tape around the connector threads from the beginning; instead, leave the first two or three threads uncovered, or your tape will get into the system.

Step 8 – Install the New Tank

Placing the new tank in the same location as the old one is essential. Connect the new tank to your heater system with caution. Check to see that the connectors are securely fastened.

Step 9 – Check the System

It is now possible to turn on the water supply. To make sure that there are no leaks, check all of the connectors.

Step 10 – Open a Faucet

Activate the water supply at this point. To be certain that there is no leakage, inspect all of the connectors.

Step 11 – Switch on the Power Supply

Turn on the water heater system’s power supply first, and then turn on the water heater itself, allowing it to come to temperature.

Step 12 – Hot Water

Once the system has reached operating temperature, perform one final inspection.

Check the hot water faucet to see whether the water flowing is hot by opening it and checking it again.

Following a final inspection of the system once it has warmed up Make a cup of boiling water and run it between your hands to see whether it is hot.

Who Needs a Water Heater Expansion Tank?

In many cases, open systems are used in the construction of residences, which allows expanding water to reenter the municipal water supply system. As a result, homeowners with open systems are seldom at risk for any of the difficulties related with the surplus volume that their tank-style water heaters may generate, because the excess water just flows back into the main water supply line. Alternatively, if your house has a closed water system, the increased water pressure caused by thermal expansion can build up extremely fast and cause significant damage to the plumbing system.

The reason for this is that most cities’ construction standards require expansion tanks to be installed in homes with closed plumbing systems.

This will avoid damage to your water heater and plumbing system.

How a Water Heater Expansion Tank Is Installed

Even though your home is equipped with an open water system, you should consider installing an expansion tank to reap the benefits of a closed system. A properly installed expansion tank, for example, can assist avoid leaky faucets and running toilets by preventing the additional built-up pressure in the system from reaching your plumbing fixtures and inflicting harm to them. It is not necessary to locate your expansion tank in close proximity to your water heater. The most often seen installation method is the use of a “T” at the cold input of the water heater.

It’s a good idea for customers who are contemplating getting a new tank-style water heater built to also seek an estimate for the installation of an expansion tank at the same time, because the advantages far exceed the time and money spent on the project.

Most makes and models of water heaters are within our scope of competence, and we provide free in-home consultations as well as upfront pricing on all of the services we do.

How To Replace A Water Heater – And Add An Expansion Tank While You’re At It!

My wife and I recently traveled out of town to work on a project, which required us to be gone for many days. As soon as we returned home on Saturday night, I jumped into a long, hot shower to unwind. I unloaded the truck and dragged the contractor bag stuffed with dirty laundry down to the basement. I was exhausted. Because I was born with great skills of observation, I was the first to notice the large puddle that had developed beneath our water heater. I murmured a stream of peculiar terms common to homeowners and do-it-yourselfers, concluding with something along the lines of “Just what I wanted to do tomorrow — replace a water heater,” or something along those lines.

  1. Something doesn’t seem quite right, doesn’t it?
  2. Just be aware that there has been an unwritten rule (at least until recently) that you will NEVER acquire all of the parts you require on the first trip.
  3. When it comes to matching the proportions, you may save yourself some money by not having to redo the plumbing.
  4. When searching for a new water heater, you’ll most likely need the following components in addition to the water heater: Teflon tape, pipe dope, sometimes known as pipe joint compound, and a tiny brass wire brush are all necessary for connecting the water heater to the rest of the system.
  5. If you’re installing an expansion tank, you’ll first need to select where it will go and then figure out what fittings you’ll need to connect it to the rest of the system.
  6. When sweating pipes together, make sure you have enough of solder, flux, and emery cloth on hand.
  7. In addition to atorch and fuel, of course.
See also:  How To Remove Heating Element From Hot Water Heater?

The use of a radio is optional, but strongly encouraged.

Obtaining an excessive tank is acceptable; obtaining an undersized tank is not acceptable.

Tanks may be put in a variety of ways, including upside down, horizontally, and right side up.

The expansion tank weights many pounds, and the weight will increase much further as water expands into it.

Some tanks are also available with mounting bracket kits, in case you wish to go the extra mile with your tank.

They should be available at your local home center.

When you install the tank, you must make sure that the air pressure in the tank is equal to the water pressure in the pipes, otherwise the tank will fail.

It is necessary to use a low-cost pressure gauge in order to install the expansion tank.

The model that I purchased weighs 165 pounds.

Most water heaters may be transported laying down; however, this should be confirmed with the vendor. Ensure that the control panel is not on the bottom if you do decide to put it down completely flat. Water heaters aren’t exactly portable. Bring a buddy with you.

Replace A Water Heater – Out With The Old

Disconnecting your non-functioning water heater is generally a basic process. The first step is to deprive it of its fuel supply. If it’s an electric water heater, switch off the circuit breaker and check the voltage using a voltage tester to make sure it’s not blown. Disconnect everything by opening up the panel where the wiring is routed through. Gas heaters should have their gas supply turned off before the flexible supply line is disconnected from the old water heater. Please keep the black pipes that were used to connect the flexible supply line to the water heater; if they are not severely rusted, you should be able to clean the threads on them and reuse them.

  1. Disconnect the gas line and any electrical connections if applicable.
  2. You must now drain the contents of the container.
  3. It’s possible that the water heater doesn’t have a separate shutdown, so follow the cold water line back to check if there’s a shutoff further upstream.
  4. Shut off the cold water supply as near to the water heater as possible to prevent damage to the heater.
  5. Installation: The water may have to be discharged by a small pump into a utility sink or out the front door if there is no floor drain.
  6. Drain the water from the tank by opening a hot water faucet and turning it off.
  7. Keep an eye on these pipes since flue gases might make them extremely hot.

Typically, a short flexible connection is used to connect the pipes to the water heater.

To avoid twisting the pipes, use two wrenches at the same time.

The majority of merchants who offer water heaters have a decent selection of new connections in stock.

Take care, because they may get really hot!

On the pipe-to-connector connection, use two wrenches to tighten it.

Roll it out of the way by tucking it behind you.

Are you completely drained?

In most cases, when replacing a water heater, it is a good idea to include a water heater pan in the mix.

The pans include a built-in drain outlet that may be attached to a floor drain to facilitate cleaning.

A water heater pan can help you avoid future irritation – as well as financial loss.

I completed the installation on my own, and trying to push the water heater up over the lip of the pan didn’t go as smoothly as I would have liked it.

I’m always looking for ways to save money.

I rolled the water heater onto the planks and over the side into the pan, which was filled with water. Water heater is in place, and the sides are not crushed – everything is OK! I constructed a DIY water heater elevation helper to help me out. It’s not nice, but it gets the job done!

Replace A Water Heater – And Add An Expansion Tank

Unless you’re planning to add an expansion tank to your “replace a water heater” project, this part is not applicable. Even though it’s really intriguing and educational, if you don’t think it applies to you, you may move ahead to the “Hookup” part. With the advent of building codes in many regions, expansion tanks are now compulsory — and for good reason. If you have a hot water heater, the water will expand as it heats up. When something grows in size, it needs to move somewhere. In the past, the most typical route for excess water to leave was through the water supply itself.

  • In most cases, the expansion tank is linked to the cold water entrance of the hot water tank.
  • Even though it may be installed further away from the water heater, the manufacturer recommends placing it within a few feet of the water heater.
  • Keep in mind that you’ll have to run the cold water supply to it, so choose a location where there are few or no impediments to do so.
  • The new hole allows the expansion tank to be placed on the other side of the beam.
  • Cold water was originally supplied by a horizontal 3/4″ copper pipe, which was then bent at a 90 degree angle to bring it down to the water heater.
  • Afterwards, the pipe would go straight through the support beam (after I cut a little chunk out of it with a hole saw), with the base of the T pointing down toward the water heater.
  • And I swapped it out with a T fitting with a pipe going out to the right side of the fitting.
  • A cutoff valve is merely a few dollars, and it will make any future maintenance much simpler.
  • The installation of a shutdown valve will make future repairs simpler.

For additional support, I utilized copper strapping that was secured to the ceiling and got ready to reassemble everything, as described in the “The Hookup” section. I made sure the new expansion tank valve was in the OFF position before reassembling everything.

The Pressure Is On

Unless you’re planning to add an expansion tank to your “replace a water heater” project, go to the next section. Even though it’s highly interesting and educational, if it doesn’t relate to your situation, you can just move ahead to the “Hookup” part. It’s now required by code in many regions, and for good reason: expansion tanks increase the capacity of a building’s water supply. In your hot water heater, the water expands as it becomes hotter. It has to go somewhere as it grows in size. For a long time, the most typical way for excess water to leave was to return to the mains water supply.

  • There are serious consequences if the pressure builds up too high and the enlarged volume of water has nowhere to go.
  • (For further information, refer to the tank’s operating instructions).
  • However, they recommend that it be installed within a few feet of the water heater to ensure that it is properly protected.
  • Keep in mind that you’ll have to run the cold water supply to it, so choose a location where there are few or no impediments to do so in.
  • The new hole allows the expansion tank to be installed on the other side of the beam.
  • An elbow at a 90-degree angle was used to bring the cold water supply down to the water heater from a horizontal 3/4″ copper pipe in the original design.
  • Afterwards, the pipe would pass straight through the support beam (after I cut a little chunk out of it with a hole saw), with the base of the T pointing downward toward the water heater.
  • And I swapped it out with a T fitting with a pipe running out to the right side of the tank.
  • Although a shutdown valve is inexpensive, it will make future maintenance far less difficult.
  • The addition of a shutdown valve will make future repairs much simpler to complete.

The expansion tank’s plumbing has been completed. The copper strapping secured to the ceiling provided additional stability, and I prepared to reassemble everything according to the instructions in “The Hookup.” I made sure the new expansion tank valve was in the OFF position before proceeding.

Replace A Water Heater – The Hookup

When it comes to replacing a water heater, the most difficult aspect is over once the new water heater is in place and operational. The only thing left to do now is drag the old tank out of there; assuming you’re still on good terms with the person who assisted you in bringing the new tank in. Finally, it’s time to connect the new water heater to the rest of the house’s plumbing system. Make careful you clean the threads on the connectors that come off the hot and cold water pipes using a cheap brass or steel wire brush before installing the connections.

  • Make a test fit to ensure that the connections you purchased are of sufficient length.
  • It’s time to make an extra journey to the plumbing supply store if you didn’t obtain a proper measurement the first time.
  • When I repair a water heater, I also prefer to apply a small amount of pipe dope on the connections – just don’t go overboard with the application.
  • All of the fittings should be snugged up before you begin to slowly turn the water valve back on.
  • Check to make sure that none of your connections are leaking; if any are, tighten them down immediately.
  • While the tank is filling, connect the power source to the tank’s output.
  • If it’s natural gas, connect the gas line.

Simply ensure that all threads are well cleaned and that pipe dope (sealant) is applied to all threaded connections.

Clean out all of the old piping associated with gas heaters.

Make certain that all of the threads are completely sealed!

Connect the discharge line to the temperature/pressure relief valve on the water heater once it has been installed properly.

The valve has a threaded connection, and the retailer where you purchased the water heater is likely to have a very affordable discharge pipe that threads directly into it.

Before you attach it, apply a little amount of pipe dope to the threads.

The discharge pipe should be threaded into the temperature/pressure relief valve.

It should be angled upward all the way out, and there should be no gaps or holes in it at any point during the process.

Check to see that the pipe and flue exit are not obstructed as well.

Our chimney had a significant amount of obstruction that I had to clear, which was caused by chunks of mortar that had fallen down into the chimney.

Check to see if there is any obstruction in your flue vent.

Once the water tank is full and your electrical or gas connections are complete, follow the instructions that came with the water heater to get it up and running!

A lower temperature setting can help you save money on electricity while also reducing the risk of unintentional burns, which is especially important if you have children or elderly people on the premises.

If you’re installing an expansion tank, continue reading; if you’re not, you’ve been granted special permission to skip to the last paragraph.

Installing An Expansion Tank? Get Pumped!

The expansion tank should be installed after the new water heater has been completely installed. Once you’ve completed all of the necessary plumbing, it’s a straightforward process that takes only a few minutes. This is supposing that you do not need to install or replace your water pressure lowering valve along the way. The pressure in the expansion tank must be equal to or higher than the pressure in your home’s water pipes. When I installed the new reduction valve, I adjusted it so that the pressure was little higher than 60 p.s.i.

The expansion tank is equipped with an inflation valve, similar to those used in a car or bicycle tire.

I was able to adjust the home pressure slightly over 60 p.s.i.

After a few minutes of pumping like Arnold Schwarzenegger, the tank’s pressure was equal to that of the rest of the home.

Hurray!

Add a little more pipe dope, tighten it down, and turn on the water valve and you’re ready to go!

Finally, your journey to find a new water heater is over.

The supply of hot water has been restored, and the cosmos has been returned to equilibrium.

The work wasn’t that difficult (after you got the water heaters up and down the stairs), and you’ve saved several hundred dollars while earning the respect and admiration of everyone around you for your efforts.

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