How To Bond A Water Heater?

What Does the Bonding Wire on a Water Heater Do?

  1. Bonding wire fittings are required on water heaters that are connected to copper pipes in some areas due to local building standards.
  2. This is a requirement under New Jersey law, as well as certain other state and local laws around the country.
  3. Even though it is not needed by the National Electrical Code, many plumbers will install a bonding wire even if it is not required by the code itself.
  4. The bonding wire is typically a thick copper wire that is secured to the cold water pipe at one end and to the hot water pipe at the other end with brass clamps.

The parts are inexpensive (about $10) and can be installed in minutes.When you consider that just a few building regulations demand the use of a bonding wire, there is some debate about whether or not it is necessary.Those who support their usage base their arguments on one of two lines of reasoning.

Reducing Corrosion

  1. It is one of the reasons for installing a bonding wire because it can prevent electrolysis from occurring when different metals are linked together.
  2. When a water heater is connected to copper pipe, the union at the point where the copper meets the steel fittings on the water heater is subjected to a minor electrical potential, which can cause corrosion to progress more quickly.
  3. In order to allow the feeble current flowing between the water pipes to avoid the copper-to-steel fittings and so prevent corrosion caused by electrolysis, the bonding wire must be placed between them.
  4. One of the reasons given by code authorities and plumbers who commonly install bonding wires is that the bonding wire will aid in the reduction of corrosion of pipe fittings and interior elements, such as the anode rod, in the pipeline.

The fact that the water heater is connected to PEX or any other non-copper plumbing pipes should be noted because electrolysis cannot occur in these situations.If your pipes are made of materials other than copper, installing a bonding wire is not necessary for corrosion protection.

Plumbing System Grounding

  1. The bonding wire, according to another school of thinking, is necessary to ensure that the whole plumbing system’s electrical grounding is completed.
  2. In order to comply with building codes, metal pipes must be electrically grounded.
  3. This is often accomplished by grounding the cold water input line to the dwelling.
  4. The water heater establishes a barrier between the cold water pipes and the hot water pipes in a home’s plumbing system.

It is believed that electrically linking the hot water pipe to the cold water pipe at the water heater would help to assure that the entire plumbing system will be electrically ground.It should be noted that a bonding wire is not required on a water heater according to the National Electric Code (NEC).The logic behind this is that the metal casing on the water heater itself is considered adequate to complete the continuous grounding line between the cold water and hot water pipes in the residence.

  • Nonetheless, there are electricians and local building codes that are adamant in their support for the water heater bonding wire as a necessary safety precaution.
  • According to some building inspectors, the presence of dielectric unions on the copper pipe fittings on the water heater indicates that a bonding wire must be connected between the hot and cold water pipes to ensure proper operation.
  • Dielectric unions are unique fittings that are used in situations where different metals are linked in order to prevent corrosion induced by electrolysis from taking place.
  • In order to restore the grounding of the whole plumbing system after the dielectric union breaks the path of metal continuity and thus disrupts the grounding channel, the bonding wire must be connected to the dielectric union.
  • Note that a plumbing system using PEX or other types of plastic water supply pipe does not require any type of electrical grounding to be installed in the system.

Recommendations

  1. After everything is said and done, it’s always preferable to abide by the rules and regulations of your local building code when it comes to installing a water heater bonding wire.
  2. It is possible that the bonding wire will provide some corrosion protection benefits if you are installing a water heater on your own if the water heater is linked to copper plumbing lines.
  3. As an added benefit, a continuous electrical rounding channel to all metal plumbing pipes in the system may be established with the aid of the bonding wire.

Fun Fact

Edwin Ruud, a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania inventor, invented the world’s first automated water heater in 1889. The Ruud Manufacturing Company, which he founded, is still in operation to this day.

Should You Have Bonding Wire on Your Water Heater?

  1. Water heaters aren’t something that most people worry about very frequently, as long as they provide hot water for showers and washing machines.
  2. When you study about the operation of a water heater, you will discover that it contains a lot of components that are pretty intriguing.
  3. A bonding wire is one of the plumbing components that sparks a lot of debate between professionals.
  4. In this post, we’ll go over the benefits of using a bonding wire and whether or not you should consider installing one on your water heater.

What is a bonding wire?

  1. A bonding wire is an external component that connects the water heater to the rest of the system.
  2. In most cases, it is made up of two brass clamps with a thick copper wire stretched between them.
  3. The cold water pipe is clamped with one clamp, while the hot water pipe is clamped with the other clamp.
  4. However, while a bonding wire is not necessarily needed by code, the item is about $10 and quite simple to install, so it is not a significant financial commitment to include one in your water heater.

Benefits of a bonding wire

Some plumbers encourage connecting wires, while others do not. This makes the bonding wire a distinctive component. When in use, the bonding wire can be used for two different things:

  1. Reduce the rate of corrosion in the water heater.
  2. A tiny electrical current that travels through the copper pipe and into the steel fittings of the water heater can be redirected by the bonding wire to the steel fittings.
  3. Using this procedure, it is believed that electrolysis and corrosion may be avoided, hence extending the service life of the water heater and preventing leaks.
  4. In contrast, if you have PEX or other non-copper pipes, you will not be affected by this problem.
  1. Complete the electrical grounding by connecting the remaining wires.
  2. Metal pipes must be grounded as a part of your plumbing system as a whole, and this is commonly accomplished through the cold water input line.
  3. The location of the water heater might result in a break between the cold and hot water pipes depending on the model.
  4. In this case, the bonding wire may be used to join the two lines and complete the grounding operation, which can help to improve the overall electrical safety of the home.

Is a bonding wire required?

  1. Depending on where you reside, you may or may not be required to install a bonding wire on your water heater.
  2. The National Electric Code does not mandate the use of a bonding wire, while certain municipal building regulations do demand the use of this component.
  3. When copper pipe fittings are connected to a water heater, some electricians and building inspectors across the country recommend that a bonding cable be used, which is supported by research.
  4. As long as you do not have a requirement for bonding wires in your location, the decision to install one on your water heater is purely a question of personal taste.

Additionally, there are no substantial drawbacks to using the wire, and it has the ability to lessen the danger of corrosion while also ensuring that your metal pipes are well grounded.

More water heater questions?

  • Reach out to the experts at Pratt Plumbing if you have any additional questions regarding how your water heater works or if you need any repairs done to your present unit. With more than 55 years of expertise in the Amarillo region, you can be certain that you’re receiving the greatest service available in the area. Make a call to us at (806) 373-7866 right away. Contractor2020 published a new article on October 10, 2019 in the category Water Heaters.

Bonding the water heater

  1. Joined on October 2, 2009 and has 39,205 posts.
  2. Discussion starter number one on January 13, 2020 In New Jersey, it is commonly known that the ″water heater must be bonded,″ which is simply connecting the cold water supply pipe and the hot water exit pipe with a jumper and a set of pipe clamps to complete the connection.
  3. I’m curious if this is needed in your region and if so, whatever code article specifies that it is.
  4. Please include the whole text of the code article.

Registered on Mar 15, 2007 with 8,692 posts.Posted 1,812 times since joining on March 1, 2014.To my knowledge, the sole code requirement for a metal pipe water system is that the system be joined to the electrical system and jumpered from one side of the water meter to the other side.

  • You might wonder why you would want to bond the water heater’s supply line.
  • That was something I had never heard of before.
  • Joined on October 2, 2009 and has 39,205 posts.
  • January 13, 2020: Discussion Starter number four.
  • To my knowledge, the sole code requirement for a metal pipe water system is that the system be joined to the electrical system and jumpered from one side of the water meter to the other side.

You might wonder why you would want to bond the water heater’s supply line.That was something I had never heard of before.It’s possible that the water heater’s inside is made of plastic and is not electrically continuous.Posted 7,054 times since joining on October 27, 2015.

To my knowledge, the sole code requirement for a metal pipe water system is that the system be joined to the electrical system and jumpered from one side of the water meter to the other side.You might wonder why you would want to bond the water heater’s supply line.That was something I had never heard of before.Perhaps this is due to the fact that the water heater pipe connections are dielectric and hence require bonding around them.Joined on October 12, 2019 with 389 posts.

This isn’t necessary in this case.Prior to discovering that it was generating difficulties with the DC voltage that the local gas companies were applying to the subterranean metal piping, gas line bonding was mandatory for all gas lines.There is no bonding of gas pipes in this area.

  • Posted 633 times since joining on February 12, 2014.
  • It’s possible that the water heater’s inside is made of plastic and is not electrically continuous.
  • The water, on the other hand, is not.
  • Joined on Mar 28, 2019 with 3,732 posts in total.
  • Water that is free of contaminants is not the best conductor.
  • Pure water has the property of being an insulator.
  • Posted 7,054 times since joining on October 27, 2015.
  • This tale was given to us by the instructor of a programming class many years ago.
  • A man had just completed washing his automobile and, in order to cool himself off, he held the water hose to his head.
  • He was permanently blinded as a result of the fact that the dishwasher heating element, which was shorting out, was switched on at the same moment.
  • His wife attempted to sue everyone, but the house had been wired ″according to code.″ I would conduct the bonding on my own house and perhaps place the water heater on a ground fault interrupter.
  • Registered on Mar 15, 2007 with 8,692 posts.

This tale was given to us by the instructor of a programming class many years ago.A man had just completed washing his automobile and, in order to cool himself off, he held the water hose to his head.He was permanently blinded as a result of the fact that the dishwasher heating element, which was shorting out, was switched on at the same moment.His wife attempted to sue everyone, but the house had been wired ″according to code.″ I’d conduct the bonding in my own home, and I’d consider putting the water heater on a ground fault interrupter.In my opinion, it is long overdue for them to figure out how to GFCI the water heater because there have been so many heating element failures due to burn through, and because the theromsat only opens one side of the conductor, it is difficult to see when the element is about to go out.Many modern waterheaters have a plastic or fiberglass covering on the interior, which might cause bonding issues in some cases, as previously stated.

  • Electrical contractor with 37 years of experience.
  • 2 years of experience as an electrical inspector Joined on November 11, 2017 with 2,157 posts.
  • Hot and cold water are supposed to be connected together, but only a small percentage of electricians and inspectors pay attention to this.
  • It is not required to be located near the water heater, but it is the most convenient location to examine.
  • It resulted in my arrest in New Jersey more than 30 years ago.
  • When I returned to New York, no one had heard of it.

The 36th year of service as an apprentice and as a floor sweeper Posted 1,826 times since joining on January 22, 2019.Perhaps we might simply run the connection above the water heater so that the inspector knows where to look for it?I suppose that could be accomplished anyplace.I believe that the hot and cold systems are considered separate systems.As previously said, the connection between them through faucets and water heaters is not assured, therefore they must be connected together and made easily available to each other and the public.

250.104 Piping Systems and Exposed Structural Metal are bonded together.Steel Water Piping (Type A).The metal water pipe system must be bonded in accordance with subsections (A)(1), (A)(2), and (A)(3) of this section.(1)General.

  • Water pipe systems made of metal that are placed in or connected to a building or structure must be bonded to one or more of the following materials: (1) Enclosure for service equipment Grounding conductor at the service (3)Grounding electrode conductor if of suitable size (4)One or more grounding electrodes utilized if the grounding electrode conductor or bonding jumper to the grounding electrode is of sufficient size (5)Grounded conductor at the service In accordance with 250.64(A), 250.64(B), and 250.64, the bonding jumper(s) should be fitted in accordance with 250.64(C) (E).
  • There must be easy access to the places of connection of the bonding jumper or jumpers.
  • The bonding jumper(s) shall be sized in accordance with Table 250.102(C)(1), with the exception of those authorized under 250.104(A)(1) (2) and Posted 633 times since joining on February 12, 2014.
  • Water that is free of contaminants is not the best conductor.
  • Pure water has the property of being an insulator.
  • Only a small percentage of tap water is pure.
  1. Minerals abound in well water and even in metropolitan water supplies.
  2. I didn’t claim it was a particularly accomplished conductor.
  3. Joined on January 5, 2019 with 4,673 posts.
  4. If the pipe is made of metal, the hot and cold water lines will be welded together at the shower valve to prevent leakage.
  5. The 36th year of service as an apprentice and as a floor sweeper Posted 1,826 times since joining on January 22, 2019.
  6. Once, I worked on a high-end housing development.

The water services were made of plastic, and the service was provided outside, at the meter stack, according to the regulations.As a result, a 150 amp subpanel was installed in the basement of each 3,000 square foot apartment.We just removed a piece of 6 from the panel and ran it through the hot and cold water in the basement that was closest to the panel.I didn’t leap it out of the water heater as I should have.Most likely, that was one of the rare times I didn’t leap it out of the water heater.During the two years that I worked there, they changed inspectors.

In order to comply with the new inspector’s request, we had to run a wire from the water pipe all the way back to the meters.He was mistaken, and we never went through with it.Upon request, he was shown the code book exemption for situations when the water supply arrives in the form of plastic in a multifamily dwelling.The 36th year of service as an apprentice and as a floor sweeper Posted on January 22, 2019 There are 1826 posts from the book Soars.Views: 302 Size: 386.4 KB

  1. Posted 1,812 times since joining on March 1, 2014.
  2. Well, I gained some new knowledge today, which is a good thing.
  3. Joined on February 2, 2016 204 total posts Required in the state of Maryland Tapatalk was used to send this message from my iPhone.
  4. Joined on October 2, 2009 and has 39,205 posts.
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The discussion starter for January 15, 2020 is number 19.Okay, so if it’s in the NEC, why isn’t it mandatory for everyone to use metallic pipes in their homes as well?6 volts to lightning bolts according to the IBEW Posted 1,233 times since joining on August 15, 2019.

  • This tale was given to us by the instructor of a programming class many years ago.
  • A man had just completed washing his automobile and, in order to cool himself off, he held the water hose to his head.
  • He was permanently blinded as a result of the fact that the dishwasher heating element, which was shorting out, was switched on at the same moment.
  • His wife attempted to sue everyone, but the house had been wired ″according to code.″ I would conduct the bonding on my own house and perhaps place the water heater on a ground fault interrupter.
  • Is it true that the metal plumbing pipe in the house was bonded?

Is it true that the electric heater had an extra ground provided by the power that came in?Something is missing from the guy’s narrative, or possibly from his and her story as well.I don’t understand how one individual could be the fault route through 50 feet of drinkable water.Tapatalk was used to send this message from my iPhone.

Water heater bonding

  1. Joined on January 9, 2009, with 139 posts, and was the discussion starter on January 24, 2013.
  2. Is it preferable to ground both the hot outlet and the cold intake of a hot water heater when grounding it?
  3. Also, what is the ideal gauge of copper wire to use?
  4. Joined on January 7, 2007 with 5,341 posts.

Is it preferable to ground both the hot outlet and the cold intake of a hot water heater when grounding it?Also, what is the ideal gauge of copper wire to use?Are you referring to this particular 30.6 KB that is bonding rather than grounding?

  • 17,921 people have seen this page.
  1. Joined on September 21, 2007 with 16,560 posts What is the scope of the service?
  2. Joined on November 24, 2007 with 9,920 posts.
  3. The following are the components of bonding at the water heater: 1.
  4. A bonding jumper, such as the one shown above, that connects the water heater’s inlet and outlet.

It would be6 copper for electric services up to 100 amps,4 for services of 100 to 150 amps, I don’t have the table handy for larger services.If either or both of these components are made of plastic, the bonding jumper(s) must be run from each metal section of the hot water plumbing downstream (upstairs, etc.) to grounding electrode conductors or bonded metal cold water pipe to complete the circuit.2.

  • One of: 2a.
  • For water heaters that use electricity, the properly connected equipment grounding conductor in the electrical feed.
  • 2b.
  • For gas water heaters that don’t use electricity, a bonding jumper from the gas piping (anywhere along it) to a grounding electrode conductor or grounding electrode.
  • Plumbing may not be part of the equipment grounding path from an electrical load (light, appliance, receptacle, etc.) to the panel.

One of the reasons is that the chance exists that at a later date a section of plastic pipe may be substituted for metal pipe and installation of a bonding jumper across the plastic section neglected.Joined Jan 9, 2009 ·139 Posts Discussion Starter · 5 · Jan 24, 2013 What size is the service?service is 100amps.What is difference between bonding and grounding?

FYI my hot water heater is gas.Joined on November 24, 2007 with 9,920 posts.Bonding – Interconnecting two metal items using an essentially resistance free electrical connection.If A is bonded to B and B is bonded to C then A is bonded to C.Electrical codes include additional rules that imply how many amperes must be able pass over the interconnection.

For example an adequate bond might be a20 gauge wire between a component and the chassis inside a TV set but might need to be a4 gauge wire between an electrical panel and a water pipe.Grounding – (1) Connecting (bonding) to a properly installed ground base (grounding electrical system) of an electrical system.The GES consists of the ground rods, main water pipe if metal exiting the house underground, neutral/ground bus bar in the panel with the first main disconnect, and fat (typically6 copper) wires (grounding electrode conductors) connecting these items.

  • (2) Providing contact with the ground (earth, soil) using means such as ground rods or the reinforcing bar inside a buried concrete slab, sometimes metal plates.
  • Joined Dec 22, 2009 ·1,844 Posts service is 100amps.
  • What is difference between bonding and grounding?
  • FYI my hot water heater is gas.
  • Bonding eliminates any difference of potential.
  • Grounding means connected to the grounded service conductor and grounding electrode system in the building.

Bonding the Hot and Cold of a Water Heater

  1. Where can I find the need to join metal water pipes within or on the exterior of a building?
  2. A is equal to 250.104.
  3. Is there a limit to the number of ends on a bonded conductor?
  4. A two-digit alpha-numeric code What is the point at which the necessity for this bonding jumper is no longer required?

A- 250.104(A) is a section of the Code of Federal Regulations (last sentence) There must be easy access to the places of connection of the bonding jumper or jumpers.Now that the point of attachment to the pipe has been determined, where is the ″necessary″ location for the other end of this conductor to be attached?A- 250.104(A) (1) SHALL be bonded to the service equipment enclosure, the grounded conductor at the service, the grounding electrode conductor, if it is of sufficient size, or to the one or more grounding electrodes that are used.

  • A- 250.104(A) (2) SHALL be bonded to the service equipment enclosure, the grounded conductor at the service, the grounding electrode conductor, if it is of sufficient size, or the one or more grounding electrodes that are used.
  • If the metal pipe in a building is divided into two distinct systems, such as hot and cold, then each system must be attached to one of the four locations specified in the section that specifies the bonding requirements.
  • From one pipe to another pipe is not described in detail in that section of the manual.
  • We must also comply with the plumbing laws if we are planning on connecting these pipes to a kitchen sink.
  • The code only allows for one piping system to be linked to this mixing valve, and it must be potable water.

There is just one system known as potable water, not two systems known as potable cold and potable hot.Why, if we believe that the two pipes need to be joined over a water heater, should a brief repair to the copper pipe be performed using nonmetallic pipe, what would be the requirement?By the way, the plumbing code allows for this to happen.Let’s wait and see what the Code Making Panel has to say about this particular restoration.

5-235 Log1834 NEC-P05 5-235 Log1834 NEC-P05 Lastly, do the following action: Reject (250.104(A)(1)) Submitter: Mark T.Rochon, Mark J.Rochon Master Electrician Submitter: Mark J.Rochon Master Electrician Recommendation: Make the following revisions: General Combination metal water piping system(s) separated by nonmetallic water piping system(s) where energized shall be bonded to the service equipment enclosure, the grounded conductor at the service, the grounding electrode conductor, if of sufficient size, or the one or more grounding electrodes used.Substantiation: Nonmetallic water pipe systems are being installed between our existing metal water piping system, however the current code does not take these modifications into consideration.

Action taken during the Panel Meeting: Reject Statement of the Panel: The requirements specified in the substantiation are already addressed by Section 250.104(B), which applies where there is not a fully functional metallic water pipe system.Number of people that are eligible to vote: 15 Ballot Results: Positive votes: 15 Unless someone can provide a written amendment enacted by their jurisdiction making it a necessity, I’m not going to do it for them.

Hot water heater bonding

  1. Posted 7 times since joining on March 29, 2012.
  2. Beginning on June 6, 2012, Discussion Starter No.
  3. 1 There was no response to this question when I looked it up on the internet.
  4. People at work keep telling me that hot and cold water pipes in the hwh must be joined, but they can’t show me the relevant code sections.

Is it covered by the NEC, and why, if the in- and out-of-hwh lines are already linked, is it necessary to bond them?Thanks Posted 1,491 times since May 17, 2011.The insides of water meters, like the outsides of water meters, do not always consist entirely of metal-to-metal contacts.

  • Although bonding hot and cold is not required in this location, I do it whenever new services or panel modifications are implemented.
  • I’m talking about how much a few feet of ground wire and two clamps are worth.
  • Joined on February 11, 2010 with 9,382 posts.
  • There was no response to this question when I looked it up on the internet.
  • People at work keep telling me that hot and cold water pipes in the hwh must be joined, but they can’t show me the relevant code sections.

Is it covered by the NEC, and why, if the in- and out-of-hwh lines are already linked, is it necessary to bond them?Thanks You gave yourself a thumbs-up for answering your own question.Joined on November 19, 2007 with 5,803 posts.There was no response to this question when I looked it up on the internet.

People at work keep telling me that hot and cold water pipes in the hwh must be joined, but they can’t show me the relevant code sections.Is it covered by the NEC, and why, if the in- and out-of-hwh lines are already linked, is it necessary to bond them?Thanks Take a look at page 14 of this document: ″Can you tell me who has the bonding jumper?″ Despite the fact that this is dated 2006, the NEC has not altered significantly since the mentioned article was published in the 2005 edition.Posts: 11,429 since joining on June 10th, 2011.Take a look at 250.104 (B), particularly the last phrase.

This implies that if you connect a water heater to a 220v power source, the equipment ground for the ckt.supplying it is all you need.Joined on November 19, 2007 with 5,803 posts.

  • Take a look at 250.104 (B), particularly the last phrase.
  • This implies that if you connect a water heater to a 220v power source, the equipment ground for the ckt.
  • supplying it is all you need.
  • Read the URL I provided you with, did you?
  • Joined on November 16, 2010 with 31,081 posts.
  • Read the URL I provided you with, did you?
  • There is nothing in the code clause that mandates the use of a bonding jumper between the hot and cold water lines at a water heater by default.
  • The tub and shower valves are almost always used to connect the hot and cold water systems together.
  • Joined on Sep 12, 2011 with 3,345 posts, taking note of petrol stations in the region.
  • 250.104(a)(b).
  • When I perform a meter resi upgrade, I use All three of you should meet at the tank.
  • Some of the inspectors in this building desire it.

Some people pay it, others don’t care.So, for the sake of one more clamp and one more foot of wire, I simply go ahead and do it.Also, be sure to check table 250.66 for your sizing.fwiw.Joined on November 16, 2010 with 31,081 posts.250.104(a) applies in gas-producing zones (b).

  • When I perform a meter resi upgrade, I bond all three of them at the tank as a precaution.
  • Some of the inspectors in this building desire it.
  • Some people pay it, others don’t care.
  • So, for the sake of one more clamp and one more foot of wire, I simply go ahead and do it.
  • Also, be sure to check table 250.66 for your sizing.
  • fwiw.

No, don’t just ‘do it’; instead, have the inspector write a code section that specifies that it is necessary.Joined on September 12, 2011 with 3,345 posts I’ve spoken to one individual in particular who believes that ″with all the pipe dope and the Teflon tape and other materials that plumbers use, it makes sense″ (paraphrase).as a result, I do it to appease him.I agree that the code’s definition of ″where the systems may get electrified″ is a little ambiguous and ambiguous.I understand all sides of the debate.

So, to me, it’s a non-issue.$3 I’m the one who’s going to preserve the peace and make everything go well.Inspections are conducted by the city, the town, and by private companies in New York State.In addition, we offer New York State additional codes.

  • As a result, things may and do become stretched from job to job at times.
  • So I simply try to maintain a level of consistency.
  • You’re familiar with the procedure.
  • the shift from perfectionist to a wink and a gaze We’ve got them all right here.:no: Joined on November 19, 2007 with 5,803 posts.
  • There is nothing in the code clause that mandates the use of a bonding jumper between the hot and cold water lines at a water heater by default.
  • The tub and shower valves are almost always used to connect the hot and cold water systems together.
  1. In spite of the fact that I understand what you are saying – and that this has most likely been argued before – I have few questions: – Are the mixing valves UL certified for this purpose?
  2. – do they have to be in order to be considered?
  3. – If the valve is replaced, would the bond be transferred to the replacement as well?
  4. In other words, does it fulfill the definition/intent of being ″consciously anchored or bonded″?
  5. – and so on Despite the fact that the remark following 250.104 in the 2011 NECH is unenforceable, it does provide some interesting food for thought.
  6. NJ appears to have taken the position that a bonding jumper at the HW is a must, and that the PC may install it without obtaining an electrical permit, and that the PI will sign off on it, regardless of the outcome of the discussion.

That same ″kindness″ should be extended to the EC so that we may replace out the elec HW devices.Joined on November 19, 2007 with 5,803 posts.Instead of merely ‘doing it,’ have the inspector show a code section that demands it.In order to appease the inspector, I comply.I understand all sides of the debate.So, to me, it’s a non-issue.

$3 I’m the one who’s going to preserve the peace and make everything go well.How far would you be willing to go if that was required on a development with more than 500 units?and you failed to include that $3 in your bid numbers, as well as whatever else the EI decides to throw at you?BBQ does have a legitimate argument, and in my opinion, he is correct.Joined on September 12, 2011 with 3,345 posts How far would you be willing to go if that was required on a development with more than 500 units?

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and you failed to include that $3 in your bid numbers, as well as whatever else the EI decides to throw at you?BBQ does have a legitimate argument, and in my opinion, he is correct.That’s an excellent question.I am the owner of two distinct firms.and have one in two separate stages of operation.

Now that I’ve stated that, I’ll leave you with one ounce of knowledge.one of my all-time favorite quotations ″The devil hides in the details because he has the ability to do so.″ check.re-check.and double-check, double-check, triple-check your quotes My response was contained inside my previous statement.

Be consistent in your actions.Always use gas, cold, or hot.:thumbsup: as well as for a piece of humble pie Even at the age of 51, I still make a lot of blunders.When it comes to large-scale projects, having many pairs of eyes may make all the difference right from the start.

  • One of my flaws is that I attempt to accomplish too much at once.
  • I’m still having difficulties fixing that.:no: :no: One thing I learnt years ago was the need of creating a clear list of job requirements.
  • I have it set up on my home computer so that I can bring it with me while bidding on tasks, as described below: You can never be too well prepared, in my opinion.
  • Be specific if you want to be successful.

Lawyers are obsessive with the finer points.because that is how you get people to listen to you.Joined on November 19, 2007 with 5,803 posts.You’re the bug on certain days, believe it or not.On certain days, you’re the windscreen wiper.

I’ve gone to both places in the same week: laughing: Joined on November 16, 2010 with 31,081 posts.While I understand what you’re saying – and I’m sure this has been discussed before – I have a few questions for you: – Are the mixing valves UL rated for the application in question?- do they have to be in order to be considered?- If the valve is replaced, would the bond be transferred to the replacement as well?

In other words, does it fulfill the definition/intent of being ″consciously anchored or bonded″?A mixing valve differs in no way from the many elbows, valves, tees, and other fittings that we rely on to connect the cold water to the hot.Joined on November 19, 2007 with 5,803 posts.

When compared to the innumerable elbows, valves, and tees that we rely on to connect the cold water together, how is a mixing valve any different?I’m at a loss for words.I am not a plumber, and I did not and do not install these products.Have you taken the time to read the link I provided?

Grounding vs Bonding — Part 10 of 12

  • All Code references are based on the National Electrical Code (NEC) of 2005. System voltages of not more than 600V, such as 120/240V, 120/208V, and 277/480V, are covered by the grounding and bonding criteria specified in this column for securely grounded systems. You’ve probably seen project specifications that ask for the grounding of pipe systems and structural steel that’s been exposed to the elements. Those regulations, while well-intentioned, fall short of the mark. It is usually always the stated objective of such restrictions to prevent harmful voltage from being applied to specified types of metal parts in the case of a ground fault from occurring. This category of metal components includes exposed structural steel members, electrically conductive metal water piping systems, metal sprinkler piping systems, metal gas piping systems, and other metal piping systems. However, these standards fall short of turning that purpose become a reality. This is due to the fact that bonding, rather than grounding, is used to safely remove harmful voltage from metal parts. Despite the fact that pipe systems and structural steel do not need to be grounded, they must be joined together. Furthermore, you must connect them in such a way that a reliable ground-fault current channel is established between them. Water distribution systems made of metal. It is not necessary to link isolated portions of metal water pipe to a nonmetallic water piping system with a bonding agent. However, when dealing with metal water pipe systems (as opposed to merely isolated portions of metal piping), you must adhere to one of three sets of bonding criteria. Which set of standards you must adhere to depends on whether your installation is a building served by a service, a building supplied by a feeder, or a building with multiple occupancy spaces. The structure was provided by a service. In order to use the metal water pipe system, you must link it to one of the following (see Figure 1): Enclosure for service equipment
  • Grounded neutral service conductor
  • Grounding electrode conductor, if necessary, as specified in Table 250.66
  • One of the electrodes of the grounding electrode system
  • The metal water pipe bonding jumper should be sized in accordance with Table 250.66, taking into consideration the biggest ungrounded service conductor. Here’s a quick and simple pop quiz for you. Given that the service conductors are 4/0 AWG (as seen in Fig. 2), what size bonding jumper should you use for the metal water pipe system? According to Table 250.66, the proper response is 2 AWG. When hot and cold water pipes are electrically linked, only one bonding jumper is required, which may be attached to either the cold or hot water pipe. Otherwise, use a single bonding jumper that is sized in accordance with 250.104(A)(1) to connect the hot- and cold-water pipes. A feeder is a building or construction that receives supplies from another source. You must connect the metal water pipe system of a building or structure that receives water from a feeder to one of the following components: The equipment grounding terminal of the building disconnect enclosure
  • the feeder equipment grounding (bonding) wire
  • and the building disconnect enclosure grounding terminal.
  • It is one of the grounding electrodes in the grounding electrode system.
  • The metal water piping system-bonding jumper should be sized in accordance with Table 250.66, taking into consideration the feeder circuit conductors that serve the building or structure. It is not necessary to make this bonding jumper bigger than the ungrounded feeder conductors in order to bind them together. Building with several occupants. If the metal water piping systems in individual occupancies do not mechanically connect to one another, you can bond the metal water piping system (for each occupancy) to the equipment-grounding terminal on the panelboard. This will ensure that the metal water piping systems in individual occupancies do not freeze. This bonding jumper should be sized in accordance with Table 250.122, taking into consideration the ampere rating of the occupancy feeder overcurrent prevention mechanism. Other metal pipe methods are available. If you expect metal pipe systems (such as gas or air piping systems) to become electrified, you must attach them to an effective ground-fault current channel first. According to the National Fuel Gas Code published by the National Fire Protection Association, the equipment-grounding (bonding) conductor for the circuit that may activate the pipe can be used as a bonding method. Because the equipment-grounding (bonding) conductor for the circuit that may power the pipe can also serve as the bonding method, the National Electrical Code (NEC) does not need any additional bonding on the part of the electrical contractor. The bonding of all metal pipes and metal ducts within a structure gives an extra level of safety, although it is not required by the National Electrical Code (NEC). Metal used for structural purposes. If exposed structural metal that is used to construct a metal building frame is likely to get electrified, it must be bonded to one of the following (Fig. 3): Enclosure for the service equipment
  • Grounded neutral service cable
  • Grounding electrode conductor, if necessary, as specified in Table 250.66
  • One or more electrodes of the grounding electrode system
  • Although it is not required by this rule to bond sheet metal framing members (studs) or the metal skin of a wood frame building, doing so is recommended as a good construction practice. The bonding jumper for structural metal should be sized according to Table 250.66, taking into consideration the feeder or service conductors that supply the building (or structure). Copper is required where the bonding jumper is within 18 inches of the earth. It must also be securely fastened and adequately protected if it is exposed to physical damage.
  • If a splice or joint is required, it must be made using irreversible compression connectors that are approved for the purpose or by using the exothermic welding process.
  • Systems that are derivable from different sources. You must connect the nearest accessible point of the metal water pipe system to the grounded neutral terminal of the separately derived system (SDS) in an area serviced by an SDS. It is necessary to make this connection at the SDS end in the same spot where the grounding electrode conductor and the system-bonding jumper come to a close. In accordance with Table 250.66, the size of this metal water piping-bonding jumper should be determined by taking into consideration the biggest ungrounded conductor of the SDS If you utilize the water pipe as the grounding electrode for the SDS, or if you link the metal water pipe to the structural metal building frame that is being used as the grounding electrode for the SDS (Fig. 4), you will not require a water pipe bonding jumper.
  • It is necessary to link exposed structural metal that constitutes the building frame to the grounded neutral conductor of each SDS where it is present. It is necessary to make this connection at the SDS end in the same spot where the grounding electrode conductor and the system-bonding jumper come to a close. Size each bonding jumper in accordance with 250.66, taking into consideration the biggest ungrounded conductor of the SDS. If you use the metal structural frame as the grounding electrode for the SDS or if you use the metal structural frame as the grounding electrode for the SDS, you won’t require a structural metal bonding jumper.
  • Glue the structural metal frame to the metal water pipe that will serve as the grounding electrode for the SDS system.
  1. Conductor for the common grounding electrode conductor.
  2. You must bind exposed structural metal and internal metal piping (in the region covered by the SDS) to the common grounding electrode conductor when you construct a common grounding electrode conductor for numerous SDSs, as authorized by 250.30(A)(4) of the National Electric Code.
  3. However, if you have linked the metal water piping and structural metal members (in the region serviced by the SDS) to the common grounding electrode conductor, you will not need to build a separate bonding jumper from each derived system to metal water piping (and structural metal members).
  4. A lightning protection system is a device that protects against lightning.

Is there a lightning protection system in place at the facility?If this is the case, connect this system to the grounding electrode system of the building (or structure).It is not recommended to utilize the grounding electrode for a lightning protection system as the grounding electrode for a building (or structure) (250.60).

  • Additional information on the grounding and bonding standards for lightning protection systems may be found in NFPA 780, Standard for the Installation of Lightning Protection Systems (NFPA).
  • If the lightning protection conductors are made of metal, bonding or spacing between the metal raceways, enclosures, frames, and other metal portions of electrical equipment may be required (per NFPA 780).
  • In most cases, the distance between the lightning protection conductors is 6 feet through air and 3 feet through hard materials such as concrete, brick or wood.
  • Grounding metal pipe systems and structural steel are topics that are frequently discussed.
  • Using such language can lead to you believing you have satisfied the criteria of Art.

250 and numerous other standards when in fact you have failed to do so.It is well known that power-quality issues are caused by bonding inadequacies.However, the worst thing is that they abandon you in a hazardous environment.Bonding is necessary for both safety and performance.

How to Test a Water Heater Element With a Multimeter

  1. An electric water heater heats the water in the tank by utilizing one or two heating elements, depending on the model.
  2. It is possible that the upper element on a two element water heater is to blame for a water heater no longer producing hot water.
  3. If your water heater generates some hot water, but not nearly as much as it should, the bottom element is most likely to be the problem.
  4. If your water heater’s circuit breaker keeps tripping, it’s possible that the element has grounded and is causing an electrical short.

Make use of a multimeter to verify whether or not your elements have been harmed.

To turn off the water heater’s electricity, locate the breaker located within the main electric panel of your home. The majority of electric water heaters make use of a double-pole circuit breaker rated at 30 amps.

On the side of the water heater, look for panels that have been screwed to the wall. A single or two panels will be installed on the water heater, depending on the size of the unit. To detach the panels, unscrew the screws that hold them in place.

See also:  How Much Does A Hot Water Heater Weigh?

Discard the insulation that was exposed when the side panels were taken off. Depending on the age of the water heater, fiberglass or closed-cell extruded polystyrene foam may be used as insulation for the water heater. When removing fiberglass insulation, protect your eyes and hands with safety goggles and gloves.

Remove the plastic safety cover off the element’s face with your fingers. The element and thermostat are both protected by this cover, which clicks on and off.

Placing a noncontact voltage detector near the wires attached to the element face, as well as adjacent to each wire linked to the thermostat, will provide the best results. If there is still power present in the water heater, the voltage detector sounds an audible alert and the light on its front panel flashes rapidly.

Disengage the two element screws by turning them counter-clockwise. Remove the wires from behind the screws by pulling them out. Write down the wattage of the element, which may be found written on one side of the element’s face.

  1. Set the Rx1k dial on a multimeter to the desired reading (resistance times 1,000 ohms).
  2. One of the multimeter probes should be in contact with one of the screws on the front of the element; the remaining probe should be in contact with the remaining screw.
  3. In order to be considered for a 3,500-watt element, the resistance should be between 12 and 13 ohms, and in order to be considered for a 5,500-watt element, the resistance should be between 10 and 11 ohms.
  4. If the element does not register on the multimeter, it should be replaced.

One of the probes should be in contact with one of the screws on the element face. Make contact with any metal portion of the water heater using the other probe. If the needle on the multimeter moves, this indicates that the heater element is grounded and that it must be replaced. Test both screws on the element’s surface to ensure that they are both in good working order.

One of the multimeter probes should be used to check each screw. Set aside the leftover probe against the metal base that is attached to the element where it is introduced into the water heater. If the needle on the face of the multimeter moves, this indicates that the element is faulty and must be changed.

10.

Reattach the wires to the rear of the water heater element. Replace the water heater element. Replace the plastic cover over the thermostat and the element with a snap. Reinstall the insulation and attach the panels to the side of the water tank to complete the process of insulating the tank. Turn on the water heater by turning on the circuit breaker.

Things You Will Need

  • Screwdriver, safety goggles, gloves, and a noncontact voltage detector are all required.

Shock Hazard Tied To Water Heaters

  • No image available

Date of the recall: April 24, 1978

Recall Details

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  
April 24, 1978  
Release78-024
 
  1. THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (Apr.
  2. 21) – According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), certain portable, immersible electric water heaters produced by G.L.
  3. Electric Flasheat Co., Harper Woods, Mich., have the potential to inflict dangerous electric shocks when in operation.
  4. An identically styled electric water heater manufactured by another manufacturer was purportedly implicated in the electrocution of a teenage girl last year, according to media reports.

The heaters are marketed for a variety of purposes, including heating water in the bathroom and kitchen.They are designed to be plugged into a standard electrical outlet and consist of an exposed resistive heating element that is either contained within a cylindrical perforated metal case or within two round, flat porcelain shells that are open around the edge.They are available in two different sizes.

  • Because both versions enable water to flow within the casings and directly into touch with the heating element, they also create a potentially lethal shock hazard when the heaters are turned on or off.
  • Consumers are advised that if they come into contact with the water container or the water itself while the heater is operating, they may be electrocuted.
  • The heaters in question include the ″Fast Heat″ model 401, which stands for ″Fast Heat.″ In addition to the perforated metal casing, models 501 and 101 feature two porcelain shells, while models 401 and 401 have two porcelain shells.
  • The warmers are available for purchase across the country, particularly at hardware stores and tack shops.
  • A decision to commence an administrative procedure against G.L.

Electric Flasheat Co.to remove these goods from the marketplace was made by the Commission on March 24, 1978, and it was authorized by its staff.Anyone who has received a shock or been electrocuted as a result of using one of these immersible electric water heaters should report the occurrence to the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s toll-free Hotline at 800/638-2772.The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) of the United States The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) of the United States is responsible for safeguarding the general public from unjustified risks of damage or death that may be connected with the use of thousands of different types of consumer products in the United States.

Incidences involving consumer products that result in deaths, injuries, or property damage cost the United States more than $1 trillion each year.Because to the CPSC’s efforts to safeguard the safety of consumer products, the number of deaths and injuries related with consumer products has decreased significantly over the past 40 years.Any individual who sells items that have been subject to a publicly publicized voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall authorized by the Commission is in violation of federal law.SaferProducts.gov

Plumbing System Electrical Grounding

  1. Electrical grounding is a method of directing potentially harmful electrical charges away from a home and into the earth underneath it.
  2. Lightning strikes and static electricity charges, according to the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors, are the two most prevalent forms of potentially hazardous electrical charges.
  3. Historically, the copper water pipe system of the home served as a safe ground for the electrical equipment of the residence.
  4. The plumbing system was grounded due to the fact that its metal pipes ran for a great distance underground.

Changes in the way houses are plumbed necessitated modifications in the way ground plumbing systems were installed by plumbers.

Different Pipe Materials

  1. A grounding device constructed of copper or cast iron was preferred over other types of water pipes because they normally stretched at least ten feet underground from where they were installed in a residence to the main water line.
  2. As the widespread use of polyvinyl chloride, or PVC, pipes in household plumbing systems expanded, the usage of copper and other metals declined to the point that water lines no longer served as dependable grounding points for electrical systems.
  3. Additionally, the usage of diaelectric unions – which link together pipes of different metals, therefore preventing electrolysis – has expanded in recent years as well.
  4. According to the Copper Development Association, these joints are poor conductors of electricity due to their nature as insulators.

The use of non-metallic plumbing materials also created a dilemma when it came to grounding – or, more specifically, bonding – plumbing systems, which was a concern for many years.

The Bonding Solution

  1. Non-metallic pipes not only have the potential to disturb an electrical grounding source, but they may also create static charges as a result of the friction caused by liquids running through them.
  2. Consequently, the plumbing system is bonded back to the electrical system, and both are grounded through the use of a secondary electrode to ensure proper operation.
  3. According to Electrical Contractor, bonding is a non-corrosive grounding wire that runs from a metal plumbing pipe back to the metal box of the home’s main electrical panel, to the wire that leads to a grounding rod outside the structure, or to the grounding rod itself.
  4. Bonding is also known as bonding wire.

It is possible to create a circuit that transports potentially harmful electrical charges away from the plumbing system and to ground by connecting the two pieces of pipe.

Secondary Electrodes

  1. A secondary electrode is a length of metal that is pushed into the ground, generally 8 to 10 feet in length.
  2. When the rod is properly inserted, just a little portion of it is visible above ground, which is sufficient for connection to a heavy gauge wire.
  3. The other end of the wire is connected to the electrical system of the home and forms a link with the plumbing system.
  4. Steel conduit, steel rods, and coper-clad steel are all acceptable grounding electrodes according to standard building regulations.

Due to the fact that some electricians still ground electrical systems to the plumbing in the home, these devices are sometimes referred to as secondary electrodes.In certain situations, the use of a second electrode is required by electrical regulations.

Tying Into Plumbing

  1. An entrance pipe near the place where the pipe enters the home must have a grounding or bonding device attached to it that is securely fastened to it.
  2. Using a grounding wire wrapped around a pipe does not serve as a substitute for using suitable pipe clamps.
  3. The bonding or grounding of plumbing and electrical systems cannot be accomplished with anything other than a properly grounded electrode.
  4. Because natural gas and propane lines transport flammable fuel, they may travel the required distance underground, but they are not appropriate for use with electrical grounding systems because they carry combustible fuel.

Bonding Water Piping: Is It A Metal System or Not?

  1. In the home-building sector, there is a silent revolution taking on right now.
  2. Single- and multi-family construction processes as we previously understood them have been completely transformed.
  3. Metal studs are increasingly being used in lieu of wood, and steel beams are being used in place of timber trusses and joists in many construction projects.
  4. Structured wiring is being used to connect telecommunications, audio, cable television, and computer systems into a unified network.

Copper water pipe is being phased out and replaced with polyethylene tubing in walls, crawl spaces, attics, and beneath slabs of concrete.Schedule 40 PVC water pipe has supplanted copper water pipe as the preferred way of installing underground water piping systems for residential buildings.Water distribution tubing made of cross-linked polyethylene plastic (PEX), polybutylene (PB) plastic tubing, and chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) is being utilized in residential buildings.

  • It is also possible to utilize a combination of these materials, such as polybutylene/aluminum/polyethylene (PEX-AL-PEX), in addition to individual components.
  • Creating joints and splices in a polyethylene tube system is performed by the use of solvent cement in conjunction with insert fittings that either fit into the tubing or are connected together using heat.
  • It is possible to transition from nonmetallic water pipe within the walls to a plumbing device, such as a sink, toilet, or hose bibb, by installing a copper 90-degree elbow and a short length of copper tubing.
  • The copper elbow is linked to the nonmetallic water pipe by solvent cement, heat fusion, or metal corrosion-resistant compression fittings, depending on the application.
  • Afterwards, the copper tubing is soldered to a copper retaining plate that spans from one stud to another and serves only the purpose of supporting the copper stub and guaranteeing that the copper pipe does not fall back into the wall.

The copper stub serves as a connecting point for the water angle-stop or shut-off valve located at the fixture’s water supply.The flexible connection between the angle stop and the plumbing fitting is frequently made of nonmetallic materials.In accordance with Section 250.50 of the National Electrical Code (NEC), a metal underground water pipe that is in direct contact with the soil for a distance of at least 10 feet or more must be utilized as one of the grounding electrodes for the electrical service to the building.For the electrical service, this metal water pipe electrode, in conjunction with any additional electrodes on the building or structure, serves to give a zero reference to ground (or a reference as near to zero as practicable).

When does the water pipe system cease to serve as a reliable electrode reference point for the experimenter?It occurs when a water pipe does not have a direct metal-to-earth connection for a distance of at least 10 feet.In a plumbing system that is largely nonmetallic, it is improbable that there will be more than 10 feet of metal pipe in direct contact with the soil.Section 250.104(A) of the National Electrical Code requires that a metal water pipe system placed in or connected to a building be bonded back to the electrical service panel.It is possible to link the metal water pipe to the electrical service enclosure, to the grounded conductor located at the service, to the grounding electrode conductor, if it is of sufficient size, or to one or more grounding electrodes located at the service.

For the most part, this bond’s purpose is to guarantee that the metal water pipe is grounded at the same zero voltage to ground as the service grounded wire.A further objective is to guarantee that electrical current flow can return to the service in the event that the metal water pipe becomes electrified.At what point does the water pipe system cease to be deemed metal and, as a result, cease to be needed to be bonded?

  • The answer to this issue is not as straightforward as the response to the one about the grounding electrode.
  • It is necessary to determine the amount of metal present in the system, as well as whether the metal pipe and any metal supports for the metal piping are susceptible to becoming electrified.
  • It is also necessary to establish whether there is a potential difference between the metal piping in the water system and an electrical circuit that is positioned in close proximity to the water pipe.
  • Is it possible for the electrical system to power the metal piping in a water piping system that is largely made of nonmetallic materials?
  • No bonding would be necessary if the response is no or improbable, in which case no bonding would be required.
  • The metal water piping must be bonded in accordance with the provisions of Section 250.104 if the response is affirmative (A).
  • As an alternative to bonding the metal in the pipe system in accordance with Section 250.104(A), an AHJ might allow the metal piping to be bonded in accordance with Section 250.104(B) for ″other metal piping systems,″ which is defined as ″other metal piping systems.″ As provided in Section 250.104(B), the equipment-grounding conductor for the electrical circuit that has the potential to ignite the metal water pipe stub may be used as a bonding method in certain circumstances.
  • As building methods evolve, a thorough understanding of grounding and bonding can aid to guarantee a safe installation while also assisting in the resolution of any gray areas that may arise.

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