How Long To Drain Water Heater

How Long Does a Water Heater Take to Drain?

Draining a water heater is something you should do once a year to ensure that your hot water heater is operating at peak performance levels. Depending on the size of your tank, the draining procedure can take as little as 15 minutes, but the prep work might take several hours, and the entire operation could take as long as a day.

Tip

If you want to thoroughly empty your water heater, you should plan on spending many hours or a whole day. Water heater flushing may be necessary more frequently if you have hard water, perhaps twice a year or more. In order to prevent calcium and magnesium accumulation in your water softener, you should drain the tank at least once each year.

Preparing to Drain Water Heater

If your water heater becomes clogged, you’ll need to drain it as quickly as possible in order to continue to deliver hot water to your home. It should be drained once a year or more frequently if you have hard water, if not already done so. In order to begin, the hot water heater must first be turned off with the electricity turned off. This is a really important phase. If you have a gas water tank, instead of turning off the circuit breaker, you’ll switch the gas valve off and into pilot mode to conserve gas.

  • Leaks are prevented by using a hose with a rubber gasket.
  • Those circumstances necessitate the use of two hoses: one to connect to the pump and another to connect to the outside.
  • Then, switch off the water supply to the tank, if necessary.
  • It will be necessary to allow the water to cool.
  • If you want to speed up the process, take a lengthy, hot shower.

Draining the Water Heater

As soon as the water has cooled, attach the hose to the drain valve and stretch the line to a location where you can drain it. Because of the particles in the water, a garden hose is not a good option. While you may use a bucket and empty the bucket as needed, the procedure will need you to start and stop it at various points. Close the valve that controls the cold water supply line. After that, you’ll want to make sure the pressure release valve is working properly. Placing a pail beneath the valve and listening for air and looking for water will help you identify the problem.

  1. Unless there is a hissing of air or a leak of water, it is possible that this may require replacement.
  2. Open the water heater drain valve and allow the water to drain entirely from the tank.
  3. Depending on how much sediment has accumulated, this might take a short period of time or a long period of time.
  4. When the water in the drain flows clean, you have completed the draining process.
  5. You can clean the tank with white vinegar if necessary.
  6. Now it’s time to put everything back together again.
  7. Before turning on the power or gas, make sure the tank is completely full.

Because you have removed the sediment from your water heater, it should operate more effectively, resulting in you using less energy to heat the water. Every year, cleaning your water heater will help you save money on your water costs.

Use These Tips to Drain a Water Heater Properly

Most water heater maintenance instructions recommend that you drain a water heater every six to twelve months, depending on how much use it gets. The reason for this is that it will aid in the removal of any sediment or buildup that may have accumulated on the bottom of the water heater tank as a result of the presence of minerals and other particles in the water. As a result of the accumulation, the water heater will have to work harder to heat the water, consuming more energy and increasing its operating costs.

Before You Begin

Before you begin, make sure you understand where the main water shutdown valve is situated in your home. While you won’t necessarily need it during this procedure, it’s always a good idea to be familiar with this valve whenever you’re dealing with any type of plumbing fixtures in your house in case something goes wrong and you need to shut off all water coming through your pipes.

Safety Considerations

When doing this procedure, you will be working with water that can be quite hot. It is possible that you will need to switch off your hot water heater many hours before you begin in order to allow the water in the tank to calm down before you begin. If you are unable to do so, use heavy-duty rubber work gloves to protect your hands from any splashes and safety glasses to protect your eyes from any hot water droplets that may fall over them.

Materials

  • Drain valve (if necessary)
  • Threaded hose cap (if necessary)
  • Drain valve (if necessary)

Perform a Quick Flush

  • Using a garden hose connected to the drain valve, attempt to clean the water heater tank a little bit while the water pressure is still on before shutting off the water supply. In order to accomplish this, first open the drain valve for a few seconds before closing it again. The pressure will blast away any silt that has become lodged in the valve, allowing the tank to empty more quickly. If a significant amount of sediment is expelled, you may need to repeat the process several times. Make certain that you’ve connected your garden hose to an outdoor place or to a bucket in order to collect the water and sediment that will be emitted from the faucet.

Turn Off the Water Heater

  • Turn off the gas to your water heater, or turn off the electricity if you have an electric water heater. Remove water by shutting off the valve on the cold-water pipe above the water heater or the main water supply valve to the home, whichever is most convenient. Test the hot water faucets around the home by turning them on and checking for water to ensure that the pressure has been released. Water may flood out at first, but if the water has been cut off properly, it should rapidly decrease to a trickle and then stop. To relieve pressure in the system, keep a hot water faucet open in the sink closest to your hot water heater.

Open the Drain Valve

  • Open the drain valve while holding your garden hose in one hand. Normally, you may complete this task by hand, but you may need to employ your flat-head screwdriver in this instance. Once the valve is opened, water will begin to rush out of the drain, so make sure your hose is either connected to the outside or to a bucket to catch the water. You should switch off the drain valve as soon as the bucket is full so that you may empty it. Repeat the procedure as many times as necessary to completely empty the tank.

Flush the Tank With Water

  • Once the tank has been completely drained, you may flush it with a few gallons at a time by turning on the water for a few seconds and then allowing it to drain out again until it is completely empty. As soon as the outflow is free of silt, it will be evident that you have completed the process and may proceed to the following stage.

Refill the Water Heater

  • Close the drain valve and remove the garden hose from the system. Make certain that all but one of your home’s hot water faucets are turned off (the one in the bathtub closest to the water heater is best). You may now re-start the water heater by turning the water back on. After that, keep an eye on the faucet you left open and, as soon as you notice that you are receiving nothing but water out of it, turn it off.

Relight the Water Heater

  • Re-ignite the water heater’s pilot light, or if it’s an electric heater, re-energize the circuit breaker. You should be able to use hot water after an hour or so.

Check the Drain Valve

  1. Check for leaks at the spout of your water heater to see if the drain on the heater has completely closed. If the outlet does not completely close, you can stop the leak by placing a threaded hose cap over the hose thread of the outlet. Alternatively, you can replace the valve entirely.

How to Flush or Drain a Water Heater

Remove mineral sediment and scale from your water heater tank twice a year by flushing it out. Your water heater will heat more effectively and last longer as a result of this improvement. This professional advise demonstrates how to flush and drain a water heater through the use of videos, pictures, and easy-to-understand language. What is the significance of flushing or partially emptying a water heater? For the simple reason that it reduces the accumulation of mineral deposits within the water heater.

  1. A very thick, crusty layer can grow at the base of a gas water heater, and the heating components of an electric water heater can be completely covered by these sediments.
  2. It eventually results in rusting as well.
  3. They can also block the valve that is used to flush or drain a water heater tank, causing it to not function properly.
  4. The hypothesis goes like follows: A small crack in the base may have filled with silt, which can assist prevent leaks, especially in a gas water heater where the flame has been roasting the steel bottom.
  5. In the event that your water heater has not been cleaned in several years, it would behoove you to consult with a few of plumbers in your neighborhood for their recommendations.
  6. Flushing or partly draining a water heater at least once a year from the time it was initially installed is the most prudent approach to follow in this situation.
  7. If you decide not to undertake the repair yourself, you could expect to pay a plumber between $80 and $100.
  8. Diagrams of Electric and Natural Gas Water Heaters It is necessary to drain a water heater tank in order to replace or repair it, as well as to remove mineral deposits from the tank, through the drain valve located at the bottom of the water heater.

The drain valve looks like a little outdoor faucet. If you use this valve, keep in mind that the water will be hot until the water has had time to cool before the water is released. In a nutshell, here’s how to flush or empty a water heater on your own:

  1. The water heater’s gas or electricity should be turned off. Close the cold water intake valve and turn it off. Connect a hose to the water heater’s drain valve and route it to the location where the water will be drained
  2. Open a hot water faucet in a convenient location around the house. Open the water heater drain valve (caution: hot water will be released! )
  3. Close the valve after flushing 3 to 4 gallons (if emptying, continue until the tank is empty)

Please continue reading for additional information on these processes.

How to Flush or Drain a Water Heater Tank

Listed below are the procedures to be followed while flushing or emptying a water heater. This video provides a wonderful summary of the subject: To turn off the gas or electrical power to the water heater, depending on whether it is a gas or an electric water heater, follow these steps: The “Pilot” setting on a gas water heater is as simple as turning the gas control to “Pilot.” 2 Turn off the cold water inlet valve, which is responsible for regulating the supply of water into the tank.

  • Make certain that this is the incoming cold water valve and not a valve for the outgoing hot water supply (the pipe should be cold).
  • The supply to this water heater is controlled by a lever valve.
  • 3 Using a hose, connect it to the tank drain valve, which is located in the bottom of the water heater, and direct it to a drain, the outdoors, or a large bucket.
  • Fill the tank with water by connecting a hose to the water heater’s drain valve.
  • As the water drains, this prevents a vacuum from building in the system.
  • To avoid scorching, exercise extreme caution.
  • 5Depress the drain valve on the water heater.

Once this is done, close both the drain valve and the PT valve.

In the event that you are totally draining the water heater, leave the drain valve open until the tank is completely empty.

7Refill the water heater with fresh water.

Return the water supply valve to its original position to re-fill the tank.

Then, reopen the hot water faucet to allow any remaining air to escape from the tank and pipes.

Allow the water to clear for a few minutes before turning off the faucet. 8Restart the water heater if necessary. If you have a gas water heater, relight the pilot light, or switch on the electric circuit if you have an electric water heater.

Water Heater Won’t Drain

If your water heater is draining slowly or not at all when you open the drain valve, you should try opening the pressure-relief valve to see if it helps (see the illustration at the top of this page). This has the potential to dislodge the vacuum that is keeping the water from leaving. In most cases, if the water heater won’t drain or drains slowly, the problem is most likely due to an excessive amount of sediment building up in the water heater. The drain valve of a water heater can become clogged with sediment.

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First Steps in Breaking a Drain Valve Clog

1Detach the water heater from the mains. Depending on whether the water heater is gas or electric, switch off the gas valve or the circuit breaker that supplies electricity to the water heater. Secondly, connect an outside hose to the drain valve and run it outside, making sure that the hose’s end is below the level of the water heater. Turn on a hot water faucet someplace in the home or open the pressure-relief valve on the water heater to dislodge the vacuum that has built up inside the tank.

If the water flows freely, the valve is functional.

4 In the event you believe that the drain valve has become clogged, you can attempt to shoot water and air bubbles back into the tank by repeatedly walking on the hose a few feet away from the tank.

If it does not, continue reading.

How to Back-Flush a Water Heater

A hose is connected between the drain valve and an outdoor faucet, and water is squirted back into the water heater through the drain valve in order to backflush it. For this project, you’ll need two male threads connected together with a double-female garden hose coupler (which can be purchased online for approximately $8).

How to Flush a Water Heater Video

Take a look at this video, which demonstrates the procedure of cleansing your hot water heater.

Back-Flushing a Water Heater Step-by-Step

1First, perform the steps outlined above for preparation. 2Close the drain valve on the water heater by twisting it in the clockwise direction. 3Connect the male end of the garden hose to an outdoor hose faucet or a washtub faucet by means of the female hose coupler that was previously installed. Hose Coupler with a Double Female EndBosch4 Turn on the faucet to fill the hose with water pressure and fill the hose with water. 5Depress the drain valve on the water heater. A torrent of water should be forced into the water heater, forcing deposits away from the water heater’s valve.

7Remove the hose from the water faucet and attempt cleansing the tank once again with the hose. If the water heater’s drain valve is still not functioning properly, the next step is to either replace the drain valve or to replace the water heater.

How to Replace a Water Heater Drain Valve

Following the above-mentioned preparation, start with step 1. Using a clockwise rotation, turn the drain valve on the water heater to prevent it from draining. 2 3Connect the male end of the garden hose to an outdoor hose faucet or a washtub faucet by means of the female hose coupler that was installed previously. Hose Coupler with two female connectorsBosch4 Then turn on the water tap to provide enough pressure to fill the hose with water. 5Pull the drain valve on the water heater open. In order for deposits to be moved away from the valve, water should be pumped into the water heater.

7Remove the hose from the water faucet and attempt cleansing the tank once more with the same results.

How to Drain a Water Heater

Water heaters are one of the most often used equipment in our houses, and they provide a variety of functions. Showering and bathing, doing laundry, cleaning dishes, and especially washing our hands are all made easier with their assistance. Over time and with usage, water heaters, like any other device, begin to develop issues that must be dealt with. In the bottom of the tank, minerals that naturally present in the water (hard water), as well as sand and grit, settle out of the water. Sediment accumulation can lower the effectiveness of your water heater, as well as corrode the metal water heater itself over time.

It is important to note that because we rely on our water heaters so much, there are precautions we can take to ensure that they are not overlooked while planning our home improvement projects.

Consult with a qualified plumber for assistance).

Note that this service should NOT be conducted on any water heater that has not been purged within the last three years.

  1. If you have an optional recirculation pump, unhook it from its power supply. If you do not have an optional recirculation pump, turn it off. If this is not the case, go to the next step. Turn off the heat source by doing so: When using a gas water heater, be sure that the burner control knob is on the “pilot” position. It is simple to switch off the electricity to your electric water heater by disconnecting it or turning it off in your electrical panel or circuit breaker
  2. However, you must be careful not to overload the system. Immediately turn off the water supply: The cold water line that is linked to the top of the water heater tank is usually equipped with a valve, which is standard on most water heaters. If this is the situation with your system, switch off the cold water supply valve at this location to prevent further damage. However, if you do not have access to this feature, find your home’s main water line and turn off the cold water from there. Connection of the drain hose to the water heater drain valve: Screw your hose (a garden hose will work) into the water heater drain valve, which is located at the bottom of the tank, and lead it to the drainage region of your choosing. It is possible to drain the unclean water into your driveway, a floor drain, or any other location that feeds to a sewer or the public sewage system. If you don’t have any of these solutions, a bucket will do in this situation. The color of the draining water and the quantity of debris that drains out of your tank may also be used to determine the degree of the corrosion that has occurred within your tank when you use a bucket to monitor it. The drain valve should be opened now that the hose has been connected to the water heater. The water in the tank should now be released through this valve. You may be able to complete this task by hand, but a screwdriver may be required at times to aid you in the process. The water will be quite hot, so proceed with caution. Air should be allowed to enter the tank at this stage since the water will be draining from your hot water tank extremely slowly, if at all, owing to the vacuum that exists inside the tank. In order to break up the vacuum and get the water flowing again, there are a few of ways to get air in.
  1. If your unit is equipped with a pressure relief valve that is linked to the tank, you can open the valve to allow for the introduction of necessary air. If your pressure relief valve does not vent, you may also allow air to enter the system by loosening the piping that links to one of the water lines at the top of the water heater
  2. However, this will cause the water heater to overheat. Finally, turning on the hot water tap on the faucet that is nearest to your water heater is a straightforward way to relieve pressure from the system.
  1. Allow the tank to completely drain: Once again, be wary of the hot water that is departing the tank. Allow all of the water to drain out of the tank entirely before continuing. According on the size of the tank, this might take anywhere between 5 and 10 minutes. Flush the tank: If you had any piping at the top of the water heater loosen in order to allow air to enter the system, be sure you tighten it back up when you are through. Then, re-open the water heater valve that was closed in step 4 to allow the water to flow again. Alternatively, you may use your palm to hit the outside of the tank (with caution!) in an attempt to break up any leftover silt. Pay attention to the color of the water that is coming out of your hose, and leave the hose running for as long as necessary for the water to be clean and clear. As a general guideline, you should leave the water running for around 5-7 minutes regardless of whether or not your water heater tank is dirty to be absolutely certain it is completely clean. Close the drain valve and remove the hose as follows: Close the drain valve using your hands or with a screwdriver if necessary. In order to avoid serious leaks, make certain that the valve, as well as everything else you detach and reconnect throughout this process, is completely tightened. You may then disconnect the hose once the drain valve has been properly closed. Open all hot water faucets in your house to remove any trapped air that may have entered the water lines while draining the tank: Next, go inside and open all hot water faucets in your home to release any trapped air that may have entered the water lines while draining the tank. Continue to run the hot water for about 4-5 minutes, or until all of the air has been expelled from the water supply pipes. As soon as the water begins to flow normally and without any spurting or halting, you will be able to know that this has been completed. Restart the recirculation pump by doing the following: The moment has come for you to plug in your recirculation pump, if you had it disconnected before starting the operation
  2. Reconnect the heat source by following these steps: At long last, you can re-ignite the burner on your gas water heater, or you may reconnect the electrical system to the wall outlet or switch it on via the electrical panel/circuit breaker

Then you’re finished; you’ve completed your task. You may now continue to enjoy clean water in the knowledge that your water heater is operating at peak performance. Check out this video from CRC Plumbing for a step-by-step visual explanation on how to empty your water heater: How to Drain Your Water Heater.

What Would Bob Do? Draining a Water Heater

Image courtesy of shutterstock.com I’ve just finished draining my water heater for the first time since it was installed in 1989.24 years ago today! I stopped after approximately five minutes since the water came out incredibly clear and there was no trace of any silt. Is this a sign that my heater is devoid of any sediment? Whatever sort of storage tank water heater you have, draining your water heater at least once a year is a good practice. Over time, sediment accumulates within the appliance, reducing its energy efficiency and causing blockages in other fixtures throughout the house, including the kitchen sink.

To remove sediment from a water heater, it is necessary to drain it not just for five minutes, but for as long as it takes for the water heater to entirely empty. Draining a water heater should be done in the following stages in the future:

STEP 1: Check the pressure-relief valve.

Before you empty a water heater, make sure it has a pressure-relief valve, which is the device that prevents the tank from exploding due to excessive pressure. You must confirm that the valve is operating correctly in order to do so. Turn off the water heater’s electricity supply. (If the unit is powered by electricity, simply shut it down.) If it is a gas-powered heater, turn it to “pilot” mode to conserve energy.) After that, open the cold water supply line valve by pulling the lever on the valve.

Once you’ve opened the valve, listen for air and look for water to confirm that it’s working.

In addition, if you open the pressure-release valve and nothing happens—no hissing air, no pouring water—it is likely that the valve has to be replaced.

See also:  How Old Is My Water Heater

STEP 2: Run your drain line.

Connect a garden hose to the water heater drain and run it to the outside of your house. You’ll most likely need at least two pieces of pipe if the tank is below grade (for example, in the basement). One will go from the tank to a portable pump, and the other will run from the pump to an outside collection container. In most cases, if your water heater is not in the basement, gravity should be able to handle the job. Allow enough time for the water in the heater to cool down (a few hours at the very least) before opening the drain valve to be on the safe side.

STEP 3: Flush your tank.

After you’ve opened all of the hot water taps in your home, you’ll want to open the water heater drain valve as well. In the event that you have opted to utilize a pump, this is the moment to turn it on. Allow the tank to completely empty before turning on the water supply (short bursts of water may help to dislodge any sediment buildup). Make sure there isn’t any silt blocking or slowing down your drain valve’s flow by doing the following: Remove the drain valve, in other words, to allow the sediment to leave through a bigger hole.

Keep a number of big buckets on standby to catch any excess water.

STEP 4: Finish up.

The water heater drain valve should be opened after you have opened all of the hot water taps in your home. The moment has come to turn on your pump, if you have chosen to use one.) Remove all of the water from the tank before turning on the water valve (short bursts of water may help to dislodge any sediment buildup). Make sure there isn’t any silt blocking or slowing down your drain valve’s water flow by doing the following: Remove the drain valve, in other words, to allow the silt to escape through a bigger hole.

Using a long screwdriver or dowel to dislodge silt after the valve has been removed may be helpful. Keep a number of big buckets on standby to catch any excess water.

Basic Water Heater Maintenance – Draining the tank

If you want to be honest with yourself, you may acknowledge it – and I will, in fact, begin by admitting that I haven’t emptied my water heater in several years. I’m fortunate in that the water is not very “hard” where I live. Sand, minerals, and other materials contained in water are what is referred to as “hard” water. As a result, if I were still a resident of Phoenix, I would be in for some major difficulties. While little amounts of silt that settle to the bottom of the tank are not a major concern, over time, they can accumulate and become a problem for the tank’s operation.

Step 1: The most important step, that is most often overlooked (Orange)

Electric Water Heater (Left Side): Turn off the power to your electric water heater by turning the breaker to the off position. Gas Water Heater (Right Side): Turn off the gas water heater by turning the breaker to the off position. You may have been fortunate enough to have a genuine outlet installed by your builder, electrician, or plumber, and you will be able to simply unplug it. If you neglect to turn off the power to the heating element(s), it is probable that they will be destroyed by the high temperatures.

Using the pilot setting at my home is no problem, while in a customer’s home, I would cut off the gas not just at the thermostat, but also at the main supply line.

Step 2: Turn off the cold water supply to the tank.

Electric Water Heater (Left Side): Turn off the electricity to your electric water heater by turning the breaker to the off position. Gas Water Heater (Right Side): Turn off the gas water heater by turning the breaker to the off position. You may have been fortunate enough to have a genuine outlet installed by your builder, electrician, or plumber, which you can easily remove. The heating element(s) will most likely be destroyed if you fail to turn off the electricity before leaving the room.

Some argue that you should switch off the gas, while others argue that setting the engine to pilot is more than sufficient.

Step 4: Time to drain the water

First, turn on a nearby hot water faucet, and then turn on the drain valve on your water heater to drain any remaining water. After you have completed this, you should turn on any hot water faucets that are nearby. Allow the tank to empty by opening the drain valve on the bottom of the tank. You may anticipate it to provide between 9 and 17 GPM, depending on the size of the hose and the pressure applied. As an example, if you have a 50-gallon tank, the water should be running at full pressure for 3 to 6 minutes; otherwise, switch on the cold water supply to the tank if the flow is sluggish, trickling, or otherwise ineffective.

Turning on the cold water supply should, in theory, assist you in blasting through the blockage faster.

Step 5: Rinse and Repeat

When the tank has been completely emptied, you can safely close the drainage valve. Reconnect the cold water supply and wait for the water heater to begin refilling itself. This will aid in the loosening of further silt in the tank. Once the tank is partially filled (about 1/2 to 2/3 full), allow the tank to fill partially before beginning the emptying procedure all over again if necessary. Once the water starts to flow, you may turn off the water supply valve at the appropriate location. This method may need to be repeated several times if there is a significant quantity of sediment remaining in the tank after the first time.

Step 6: The final few steps

It’s time to go backwards, or at least to retrace our tracks. To begin, you must first turn off the drain valve and detach the hose. Pour cold water into the tank by opening the cold water supply valve approximately halfway and allowing it to gently fill while checking for leaks. It is recommended that you remove the aerator from the open faucet and rinse it while this is taking place. When hot water begins to flow from the hot water faucet, the tank is full, and you may turn off the faucet and re-install the aerator to finish filling it.

A few final notes:

Is it really necessary to clean out your tank once a year? The practice is recommended, particularly if you have well water or naturally hard water. In the case that you are following our monthly maintenance checklists, we did mention it as an annual item merely because it is simpler to recall than the ever common “Did I complete it last year or not?” question. When using an electric water heater, remember to cut off the power before draining the water since even a partial drain might expose the higher heating element to the air and cause it to malfunction permanently!

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How to Maintain & Drain A Water Heater: 8 Step Guide

Date of publication: December 2019 You may take your water heater for granted until it stops working and you are forced to take a frigid shower in the middle of winter. Even worse, it might cease operating altogether, resulting in water splattered all over the floor. Fortunately, a hot water heater does not require much maintenance, although emptying it on a regular basis may assist to ensure that it continues to operate smoothly. Consider the following recommendations for maintaining your water heater.

According to The Family Handyman, silt builds up in the bottom of a water heater over time, which can cause obstructions in the system.

If you do not properly maintain your water heater, it may not operate at peak efficiency or may even fail to operate at all in some cases.

GET A HOME QUOTE.

A high level of protection for your house makes all the difference when it comes to keeping your family safe. Allstate home insurance can assist you in protecting what is important to you. Request a quote Locate a representative. When it comes to draining a water heater, the DIY Network recommends the following measures. The owner’s handbook for your water heater will provide you with particular information on your water heater. For those who are uncomfortable completing this sort of maintenance on their water heater, contact a plumber to arrange for a professional draining to be performed.

  • A water line and a shutdown valve leading into the water heater may be found at the very top of the water heater’s tank.
  • Step 2: Disconnect the water heater’s power supply line.
  • Alternatively, if you have an electric water heater, turn off the electricity at your home’s electrical panel.
  • If you have a gas water heater, according to the DIY Network, you may change the water heater’s thermostat to “pilot” to complete this procedure.
  • Check your water heater’s owner’s handbook and follow the directions that are provided for your particular water heater.
  • Because your water heater is running at a high temperature, it is incredibly hot.
  • (According to BobVila.com, you should at the very least wait a few hours.) In addition, taking a hot shower can assist to accelerate the cooling process.) Step 4: Connect a hose to the drain valve.

Connect the other end of the hose to the drain valve located at the bottom of your water heater.

The hot water tap, such as a sink faucet, that is closest to the water heater should be opened.

According to the DIY Network, it is preferable to use a tap that is located on the floor above the water heater.

As soon as you turn on this valve, the water will begin to drain out of the storage tank.

Step 7: Reconnect the water supply to the tank and flush it with fresh, clean water to finish the job.

It is necessary to repeat this process until the water flows clean.

Step 8: Refill the tank with water.

Return the water supply to its original setting to begin replenishing the tank. Once the tank is full, turn on the electricity or gas supply to the water heater to re-energize it. While draining the tank, remember to turn off the faucet that you had previously turned on.

How Often Should You Drain Your Water Heater?

According to both BobVila.com and The Family Handyman, it’s a good idea to empty your water heater at least once a year in general. If you reside in a hard water area, on the other hand, according to Angie’s List, you may need to empty your water more often. Always remember to consult your owner’s manual to see what the manufacturer suggests before making any changes. Water heaters are relatively low-maintenance appliances, but it’s important to remember to drain yours on a regular basis. If you do this, you may be able to keep it working effectively and the hot water going.

Please keep in mind that a certain precaution may not be suitable or effective in every situation, and that adopting preventative steps does not ensure a positive outcome.

How Long Does It Take To Drain A Water Heater? [7 Amazing Unknown Factors]

TanklessWaterHeaterExpress is sponsored entirely by its readers. Because I am an Amazon Associate, I receive money when people make eligible purchases. Obviously, if your water heater is experiencing significant issues, it is imperative that you fix it immediately after emptying the water from the heater. However, if you are concerned about how long it will take to drain the entire water, it is important to note that this is dependent on the amount of water available as well as the plumbing structure of your property.

  • Here is a reference on How Long Does It Take to Drain a Water Heater that you can go to for more information!
  • Recognize the gravitational pull of water.
  • As a result, the downward force is proportional to the rate of water flow and the inner diameter of the pipeline.
  • If the surface is smooth, it will allow for a greater volume of water to be discharged more quickly, increasing the rate at which the water drains.
  • If the flow rate is high, the gravitational force will be larger as a result.
  • Inspect the pressure head for damage Next, there’s the pressure head, which is a very essential consideration.
  • Per the calculation, 1 foot of elevation decrease equals 0.4332 pounds of pressure head.
See also:  How Often To Replace Frigidaire Water Filter?

As a result, the greater the pressure head, the better it is for both the source and the output of the system.

Be familiar with the pipe material.

There are two factors to consider, the internal diameter and the outer diameter, which are as follows: It, combined with the material from which the pipe is constructed, defines the volume capacity of the pipe.

If it is low, on the other hand, the water flow rate will increase.

As a result, the one-inch pipe can provide you with both high force and individual volume to drain down the pipe, making it more suitable and convenient.

Have a basic understanding of hydraulics.

While the tank is being drained, check to see that there are no airlocks that need to be addressed.

As a result, the drain flow is stopped in this situation.

To avoid any form of pressure, be certain that there is no airlock within the pipe. In addition to this, the hydraulics has an impact on the flow rate of the pipe when it is vertical. You will need to overcome the airlock that has formed in your system if at all possible.

Other Factors Affecting the Flow

In addition to these four criteria, there might be a variety of other factors that influence the period of flow. You may view them by clicking on the links below: 1. The first thing to consider is the amount of water available. If you have a tiny tank, it will just take you 1-2 minutes to completely drain it out. However, if the tank is larger, the process may take longer. Another thing to consider is the formation of sediment in the drainpipe. If there is more sediment, it will obstruct the flow rate and cause it to take the longest possible amount of time.

If your heater is located on the second floor and the majority of your faucets are located in the first level, cleaning up will take longer.

Frequently Asked Questions

The draining of my water heater is taking an unusually lengthy time. Q1. A1.The accumulation of sediment in the drain pipe has the potential to lower the flow rate of water via the drain pipe. In general, rust and debris have a difficult time flowing out of the pipe. As a result, it may take longer to drain the water. The removal of material prior to the drain is quite vital in such a circumstance. Q2. What is the fastest way to empty the water heater? To quickly empty your water heater, try attaching a temperature-pressure release valve to the tank.

  1. The result is that water drains out more quickly when pressure builds in the system.
  2. What is the approximate time required to empty a 50-gallon water heater?
  3. In most cases, the flow rate is around 10 gallons per minute.
  4. We’ve just published a new post about the best 50 gallon gas water heater on the market.
  5. A4.A high-pressure release valve is installed in the majority of the 40-gallon water tank.
  6. As a result, it will take around 4 minutes to completely empty the tank of water.

Conclusion

The amount of water that drains from the tank is dependent on a number of parameters that must be monitored. However, if you want your heater to function effectively on a consistent basis, you will need to maintain it. Consequently, make certain that the drain pipe is clean and that it is properly attached to the heater so that it does not interfere with the drain pipe.

How to Drain a Water Heater (& When You Shouldn’t!)

Homeowners in Birmingham who have classic tank-style water heaters need to know how to empty a water heater properly.

This is a vital step in the maintenance of a water heater. You will receive step-by-step instructions on how to do this work yourself from our plumbing pros, as well as information on when you should call a professional and when you should refrain from draining your tank.

How to Drain a Water Heater Tank

Tank water heaters should be emptied about every six months by performing the following steps:

  1. Approximately every six months, tank water heaters should be emptied by doing the following steps:

Why Drain Your Water Heater Tank?

On average, a tank-style water heater sees a large amount of water pass through its tank over the course of a year. While softened water is used in many houses today, certain minerals and sediment are still carried into the water heater — and if you have hard water, your water heater is more adversely affected by higher concentrations of these pollutants. During the storage of water in the tank, silt and minerals fall to the bottom of the tank where they gather. Water passing through them leads them to accumulate over the course of a year, causing troubles for your tank.

  • Corrosion of the tank, resulting in both large and tiny leaks
  • A reduction in the amount of hot water available
  • Popping sounds caused by air trapped in the sediment
  • It’s difficult to get water to boil
  • Utility bills that are higher

When Not to Drain Your Water Heater Tank

While learning how to drain a water heater isn’t a common home maintenance activity, there are specific situations in which you may not want to do so. The first situation is simply if you are not confident in your ability to carry out this maintenance operation on your own. Leaving water heater repair to a professional is always a wise decision in this circumstance since you don’t want to chance causing any damage to your water heater or causing any water damage to your property. Next, if you’ve never done it before, refrain from draining your water heater!

When sediment accumulates in the water heater tank, hot spots along the bottom metal are frequently created, causing the metal to corrode and eventually fail completely.

If you drain the water heater and remove the sediment all at once, you will almost certainly end up with a leaking water heater.

Get Water Heater Help from Plumbing Experts

While learning how to drain a water heater isn’t a common home maintenance activity, there are specific situations in which you might not want to do so. Basically, the first case is when you are not confident in your ability to conduct the necessary preventative maintenance. Water heater repair should always be left to the professionals in this circumstance — you don’t want to take any chances with your water heater or your home’s water supply by performing it yourself. Next, if you’ve never done it before, avoid draining your water heater.

When sediment builds up in the water heater tank, hot spots along the bottom metal are frequently created, causing the metal to corrode and eventually fail completely.

The sediment in your tank may have actually stopped these minor leaks over the course of time if your tank is full with sediment. If you empty the water heater and remove the sediment all at once, you will almost certainly end up with a leaking appliance.

Frozen Hose Bib: How to ThawPrevent Major Water Damage

While learning how to drain a water heater is not a common home maintenance activity, there are specific situations in which you may not want to do so. The first case is simply if you are not confident in your ability to do the maintenance activity. It’s usually a good idea to delegate water heater repair to a professional in this circumstance since you don’t want to risk causing harm to your water heater or water damage to your property. Next, if you’ve never done it before, don’t deplete your water heater!

When sediment builds up in the water heater tank, hot patches along the bottom metal might develop, causing the metal to corrode and eventually fail.

If you empty the water heater and remove the sediment all at once, you will almost certainly end up with a leaking unit.

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How to Drain a Water Heater

Video Playback is not supported at this time. Every year, draining your water heater eliminates sediment that might cause it to work harder and cost you more money to run the heater.

  • The first step is to cut off the electricity or gas to the water heater. After that, close the cold water supply valve, which will prevent water from flowing into the heater. Glue a garden hose to the drain valve at the bottom of the tank and let it flow on the ground outside
  • Activate the drain valve that is connected to the hose. Pulling up on the pressure release valve on the tank’s top will allow it to be opened. Allowing the water in the tank to drain is recommended. If there is still sediment in the tank after it has been emptied, open the cold water valve for several minutes to flush it out. Close the drain valve as well as the pressure relief valve and let the tank to fill up again. If the heater is powered by gas, relight the pilot and switch it on
  • If your water heater is electric, you’ll need to reset the breaker to restore electricity.

First and foremost, switch off the electricity or gas to the water heater. Turn off the cold water supply valve, which permits water to flow into the heater; and then turn it back on. Connect a garden hose to the drain valve located at the bottom of the tank and run it outside on the ground. Activate the drain valve that is connected to the hose: Pulling up on the pressure release valve on the tank’s top will allow it to be opened; Ensure that the water in the tank has been allowed to drain; If there is still sediment in the tank after it has been emptied, turn on the cold water faucet for a few minutes.

To reactivate the water heater if it is electric, turn the breaker to the on position.

Further Reading

  • It is critical to drain a hot water heater once it has been plugged with a toilet tank and bowl leak detection kit. How to Check for Leaks in the Toilet Tank and Bowl

How long does it take for a 50 gallon water heater to drain?

Aside from the amount of time it takes to empty your water heater, the size of the tank itself determines how long it will take. With a 50 gallon tank and a hose pressure that permits 10gallons per minute (GPM) of water to flow through it, you may anticipate the tank to be completely drained in around 5 minutes. I’ve now switched off the main valve, so we’ll see if that solves the problem or not. You should have a pressure release valve with a downtube installed to your system before starting.

The time required to drain 40 gallons is 45 minutes, or less than a gallon per minute.

It is possible to examine how much silt ends up in and around the drain valve.

The silt interferes with the tank’s capacity to heat the water, causing it to work harder to heat the water as a result.

It takes around 20-25 minutes to drain the whole amount of water from the heater and complete the entire operation.

Ideally, with a flow rate ranging from 9 GPM to 17 GPM, for a 5—gallon tank, if the water runs out in full force, the tank will be completely emptied in 6-7 minutes, according to the manufacturer.

How do you get the sediment out of a hot water heater that has built up? How to Flush Sediment from a Water Heater (with Pictures)

  1. Turn off the water heater and the cold water valve
  2. Turn off the faucet. Allow the water to cool. The drain valve on the side of the tank should be connected to a drain or a garden hose. Placing the hose’s other end in a bucket or drainage system Turn on a faucet (or two), if possible. Turning on the drain valve will begin the process of draining the tank.

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